'Worst of the Weak' — Houston's ranked here

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No. -10 Penn State’s schedule . . . As if opening the season with four straight home games, three of which were against Akron, Syracuse and Temple, wasn’t enough, the Nittany Lions are at it again. After mixed results in Big Ten play, Penn State goes back to its bread-n-butter, hosting Eastern Illinois. Joe Paterno defended this victim rental by saying: “HOUSTONutep.jpg

No. -9 Houston . . . A week before hosting Houston, UTEP’s only score in a 64-7 loss at Texas came on a 49-yard interception return, which nearly matched the 53 yards of total offense gained by the Miners on the day. So after going 2-0 against powerful Big 12 teams, what did the Cougars do in their Conference USA opener? They allowed Miner running back Donald Buckram to rush for 262 yards and four touchdowns on 32 carries, leading his team to an amazing 58-41 upset of what was the No. 12 team in the nation. When you throw for 536 yards, earn 42 first downs and lose by 17 points to a team that came in ranked 109th in scoring offense, something is terribly wrong.

No. -8 LSU fans’ phone fetish . . . I guess Tiger fans really believe that their prank calls and texts two years ago to Tim Tebow, prior to Florida’s last visit to Death Valley, made the difference in LSU’s 28-24 victory. They’re at it again. This time targeting head coach Urban Meyer, offensive coordinator Steve Addazio, quarterback John Brantley and wide receiver Riley Cooper. Hey! What about pestering someone associated to the defense? LSU ranks last in the SEC in total offense and 99th in the nation. The Tigers on that side of the football will need all the help they can get versus the Gators.

No. -7 Florida International at Western Kentucky . . . You’ve been waiting patiently and it’s finally here — “Worst of the Weak” Super Bowl III. The Golden Panthers are a not-so-golden 0-4 and the Hilltoppers are equally low at 0-4 as well. Someone has to win this Sun Belt slugfest! May the weakest team lose.

No. -6 Bobby Bowden supporters . . . When Deion Sanders (aka, the most hated man in Stillwater today) is a major player on your side of the debate, you’ve got serious problems. His “funeral” quote was off the charts. Anyway, let’s get back to reality. FSU is 2-3 for the first time since 1976, which incidentally was Bowden’s first year in Tallahassee. Can’t these people see that the bookend has created itself. What’s wrong with taking the next step in the “head coach in waiting” situation that’s already in place for Jimbo Fisher? It’s not like you didn’t know that this day would come. What’s wrong with doing it sooner than later? Don’t you know how this murky situation has already affected recruiting?

No. -5 Bobby Bowden detractors . . . They rank a tad lower than the supporters. South Florida head coach Jim Leavitt hit a home run when he said: “What’s going on up there, I think is ridiculous. I think, to me, it’s embarrassing. I remember growing up here, when Florida State was a teacher’s college and didn’t have nearly the significance it has now. What he’s done for that program is legendary, and to me, he has every right to retire whenever he wants to retire.” Yes, if not for Bowden, Florida State would probably be something akin to Alabama State, Tennessee State, South Carolina State and Texas State. FSU Board of Trustees chairman Jim Smith should be ashamed of himself for unprofessionally using the media to say: “Enough is enough.” Leave Bowden alone for a couple months to make a decision on his own. Your team has averaged eight wins per season since 2004, so this isn’t anything new. Relax. Have patience. Then, pray that the next stage of Seminole football isn’t worse.

No. -4 Pete Carroll’s bromance with Barkley . . . Is it just me or does the Trojan boss seem to continually rewrite the book on how coaches should treat players? His latest declaration exhibiting extreme bias toward freshman quarterback Matt Barkley is a doosy. In response to a question asking why he didn’t bring in Aaron Corp to mop up for his golden child at the end of last Saturday’s 30-3 victory at Cal, he actually came up with this: “I just thought (Barkley) should finish it. He needs to play and be out there when the game is winding down.” Is this guy really serious? People buy this stuff?

No. -3 SEC officials . . . Responding to a request by Big Ten officials to get them off the hook for a week, the SEC zebras made total jackasses of themselves at last Saturday’s LSU-Georgia game. Everyone knows about the asinine “excessive celebration” penalty they called on Georgia wide receiver A.J. Green. But how about keeping their flags in their pockets on the vicious helmet-to-helmet spear that Tiger defensive end Rahim Alem laid on Bulldog running back Caleb King, who fractured his jaw and sustained a concussion on the play?

No. -2 Cal . . . Holding steady here in the second spot, the Golden Bears laid yet another egg. This time at home to USC, 30-3. Cal hasn’t scored a touchdown since Sept. 19. And there’s no telling how long this malaise will last. Here’s a dose of reality. Since Oct. 14, 2006, Cal has won only two Pac-10 games on the road — and one of them was against Washington State, so that doesn’t count. Good luck in your next game on Oct. 17 at UCLA.

And finally, the absolute “Worst of the Weak” . . .

No. -1 UNLV . . . As you might expect from a team that was winless on the season, Nevada had four turnovers
and 15 penalties for 169 yards last Saturday against UNLV, but the Wolf Pack easily overcame those errors and routed the Rebels, 63-28. Nevada converted on all seven of its third downs, but it’s amazing that they faced any in the first place, considering that the Wolf Pack gained 773 yards of total offense, averaged 10.2 yards per rush and threw only three incompletions. As you can see, UNLV was barely present.

Two Vanderbilt players shot in incident involving stolen phone

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While that’s a serious-sounding headline, it could’ve been a lot worse for a pair of Vanderbilt football players.

According to WSMV-TV, O’montae “Tae” Daley and Frank Coppet were shot outside of a Nashville Target store Monday night.  The former, a true freshman defensive back, was shot in the leg while the latter, a redshirt freshman defensive back, was shot in the arm.  Both of the injuries are considered non-critical.

The shooting occurred after a third Commodore football player, wide receiver Donaven Tennyson (pictured), had his phone stolen in an earlier incident and, along with the other two, concocted what was described by police as “an ill-conceived plan to recover a stolen cellphone.”

From the television station’s report:

Police said the incident leading up to the shooting happened on Monday when… Tennyson met up with someone to try to sell his cellphone. Tennyson’s cellphone was stolen during the meeting in the parking lot of the Chili’s on West End.

Tennyson told police he noticed his stolen phone was listed online, which is when he reportedly made a fake profile and arranged a meeting with the seller at Target.

The 19-year-old brought two friends with him, 18-year-olds O’montae Daley and Frank Coppet. The trio brought a pellet pistol with them.

Coppet reportedly got out of their car with the pellet gun, which is when two people in a gray Buick sedan opened fire.

In addition to getting shot, one of the victim’s had his car stolen by the alleged shooters for good measure.  Police are still searching for the alleged assailants, and haven’t yet released a description.

The school has yet to publicly comment on the shooting.

Last season as a true freshman, Tennyson played in eight games for the Commodores, while Coppet took a redshirt his first season with the program.  Daley was a three-star member of Vandy’s 2017 recruiting class coming out of high school in Georgia.  He signed early and participated in spring practice this year.

Committee launched to formulate plans for college football’s 150th birthday

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On Nov. 6, 1869, Princeton and Rutgers squared off in the first-ever college football game.  Nearly 148 years later, the powers-that-be in the sport are in the beginning stages of commemorating the momentous event.

The National Football Foundation announced in a press release that “[a] group of college football leaders announced plans today to launch a nationwide celebration to commemorate the game’s 150th anniversary.” The group will be headed by Kevin Weiberg, longtime college athletics administrator and former Big 12 Conference commissioner.

There are a baker’s dozen other individuals who will be involved in planning the festivities as part of the committee, including the two current athletic directors of the teams involved in the sport’s first game.

  • Todd Berry, executive director, American Football Coaches Association
  • Ari Fleischer, president, Ari Fleischer Communications
  • Bill Hancock, executive director, College Football Playoff
  • Steve Hatchell, president & chief executive officer, National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame
  • Pat Hobbs, director of athletics, Rutgers University
  • Chris Howard, president, Robert Morris University
  • Mike Kern, associate commissioner, Missouri Valley Football Conference/FCS Managing Director
  • Oliver Luck, executive vice president of regulatory affairs and strategic partnerships, NCAA
  • Mollie Marcoux Samaan, athletics director, Princeton University
  • Larry Scott, commissioner, Pac-12 Conference
  • Jon Steinbrecher, commissioner, Mid-American Conference
  • Bob Vecchione, executive director, National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics
  • Wright Waters, executive director, Football Bowl Association

“This is a very exciting moment for fans of college football,” Weiberg said in a statement. “Across the country, college football is a deeply ingrained part of life for millions and millions of people. While it’s too soon to know our exact plans, we want to put something together that is big and special, something fans can be proud of. We will work closely with leaders from all divisions of college football to build a national celebration for fans to enjoy.

“No one could have imagined that since the first football game was played on November 6, 1869 that college football would grow to become one of America’s greatest traditions, beloved by tens of millions of fans every year,” said Scott. “At all divisions of play, college football is special and we intend to launch a nationwide celebration to mark the anniversary.”

Ex-Alabama WR T. Simmons officially a WVU Mountaineer, too

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In the post below this, we noted that Jovani Haskins is officially a member of the West Virginia football program.  T.J. Simmons can say the same as well.

After Simmons announced it via social media over this past weekend, WVU has confirmed that the wide receiver has signed a grant-in-aid for the 2017-18 academic year and will continue his collegiate playing career with the Mountaineers.  That continuation won’t happen immediately as, after sitting out the 2017 season to satisfy NCAA transfer bylaws, Simmons will have three years of eligibility remaining with the Mountaineers.

Simmons had decided last week to transfer out of the Alabama football program.

A three-star member of the Crimson Tide’s 2016 recruiting class, Simmons was rated as the No. 58 receiver in the country and the No. 9 player at any position in the state of Alabama.

As a true freshman, Simmons played in 12 games, mainly on special teams.  In this year’s annual spring game, the 6-2, 201-pound receiver caught six passes for 82 yards and a touchdown for the Crimson Tide.

WVU makes addition of ex-Miami TE Jovani Haskins official

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One down, one to go.

Over the weekend, both former Miami tight end Jovani Haskins (HERE) and ex-Alabama wide receiver T.J. Simmons (HERE) indicated on social media that they would be transferring and continuing their collegiate playing careers at West Virginia.  Monday, WVU confirmed that the former has signed his grant-in-aid for the 2017-18 academic year.

Haskins will have to sit out the 2017 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules.  Beginning with the 2018 season, he’ll have three years of eligibility remaining.

A three-star member of the Hurricanes’ 2016 recruiting class, the 6-4, 245-pound Haskins was rated as the No. 18 tight end in the country and the No. 10 player at any position in the state of New Jersey.  He took a redshirt as a true freshman.

Earlier this month, Haskins opted to transfer from The U in order to “get a fresh start somewhere else.”

Haskins is the third Power Five player to officially transfer to the Mountaineers this offseason, joining former Syracuse defensive back Corey Winfield (HERE) and ex-Miami quarterback Jack Allison (HERE).