Dez/Deion mess gets murkier; Cowboys could lose wins

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If Oklahoma State was looking for a clean, concise and — most importantly — extremely quick resolution to the Dez Bryant situation, the overnight developments are pointing to things possibly getting worse before they have a chance to get better.  If they do at all.

According to Tulsa World, a meeting is tentatively scheduled for this coming Tuesday in Indianapolis between OSU assistant director of compliance Scott Williams and NCAA officials to discuss Bryant’s eligibility issues.

At the very heart of Bryant’s ineligibility is his relationship with Deion Sanders and why he felt the need to initially lie about it.  The best-case scenario for Bryant — and Sanders as well — is that the NCAA finds the extent of the relationship between the two to be exactly what they say it is — a jog here, a dinner there, and a kid who simply “panicked” and lied when asked by the NCAA about those innocuous interactions.

The worst-case scenario for both?  The NCAA finds that Sanders was serving as some type of conduit to Eugene Parker, an agent who represented Sanders during his time in the NFL and a man who the Hall of Famer still remains close to as the case of “Crabtree, Michael” suggests. 

For Bryant, such a conclusion would mean the end of his collegiate career, although he was very likely to jump to the NFL early anyway.  For Sanders?  I’m certain Mike Florio will have something to say about what it would mean to Prime Time.

According to the Associated Press, the issues swirling around Bryant and his involvement with Sanders — as well as another former NFL player, Omar Stoutmire — started well before the start of the 2009 season.

Emails obtained by the AP show that OSU was actively looking for a resolution to Bryant’s case before the season began.  And the reason for that is quite simple.  If the NCAA ultimately finds Bryant ineligible — remember, it was OSU that declared the receiver ineligible — the Cowboys could be forced to vacate any wins in which Bryant played.

In an Aug. 26 e-mail, associate athletic director for compliance Scott Williams mentions that Oklahoma State’s season opener was approaching – at that point 10 days away – and the school would need to make “a determination on Dez’s playing status.”

Even more ominous was an email exchange obtained by the Daily Oklahoman, with the NCAA reminding OSU that it’s the school’s responsibility to certify a player’s eligibility.

On Sept. 2, responding to an inquiry about Bryant’s status, an NCAA official reminded Williams “it is the institution’s responsibility to certify the eligibility of its student-athletes,” adding that OSU “must feel comfortable that Mr. Bryant is eligible to compete.”

OSU released a statement on Wednesday announcing that Bryant was ineligible because he “failed to openly disclose to the NCAA the full details of his interaction with a former NFL player not affiliated with OSU.”  The interesting twist, though, is that OSU wanted to include the relationship between Sanders and Parker in the statement.

“Would it be possible to release information regarding an alleged association between the former NFL player and an active agent? Would it be permissible to release information regarding the alleged workouts?” Williams asked in an e-mail this week according to the AP. “What parts of the investigation are we restricted from discussing?”

The NCAA advised the school to not include specifics of the investigation in their public statement.

It’s very clear that OSU will attempt to shift the blame for Bryant’s initial dishonesty to the Sanders/Parker tandem in a misguided attempt to curry some type of of favor from the NCAA in regards to their handling of the case.  What’s unclear at this time is what exactly the remainder of the ’09 season will hold for Bryant.

Another certainty?  Deion Sanders should be considered hazardous waste by any and all collegiate football player and institution of higher playing learning from here on out, and should only be approached while wearing HAZMAT-approved equipment.

Or, as Tim Cowlishaw of the Dallas Morning News so eloquently put it:

For most of Deion Sanders’ 14 years in the National Football League, it was a good idea for wide receivers to stay away from him.

Apparently, it still is.

Ex-LSU, Rutgers QB moves on to FCS school

PISCATAWAY, NJ - SEPTEMBER 26: Hayden Rettig #11 of the Rutgers Scarlet Knights looks on before a game against the Kansas Jayhawks at High Point Solutions Stadium on September 26, 2015 in Piscataway, New Jersey.  (Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)
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Maybe the third time, this time at a lower level, will be the charm?

In early December of last year, Hayden Rettig became one of three quarterbacks who had decided to leave Rutgers.  Nearly three months later, Rettig has found a new home, with the transferring signal-caller confirming to nj.com that he will continue his collegiate playing career at Tennessee Tech.

As he’s both a graduate transfer and a player dropping down a level, Rettig will be available to play immediately in 2017. This upcoming season will be his final year of eligibility.

“It’s a good fit,” Rettig told the website. “I think we can do a lot there. I love the coaches. I just wanted a place where I was needed, and Tennessee Tech was the place.”

Rettig, a four-star 2013 recruit, transferred from LSU to Rutgers in June of 2014.  After sitting out that season to satisfy NCAA transfer bylaws, Rettig played in five games (one start) the next two years; none of those appearances came in 2016.

He was named Academic All-Big Ten following the 2015 season.

UNLV goes Ivy in replacing RBs coach poached by North Carolina

LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 12:  Members of UNLV Rebels marching band perform in the stands during UNLV's game against the Wyoming Cowboys at Sam Boyd Stadium on November 12, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. UNLV won 69-66 in triple overtime.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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Raided by the ACC, UNLV has officially turned its eyes to the Ivy League for its coaching replacement.

Travis Burkett, the football program has announced, has been hired the Rebels’ running backs coach.  Burkett will replace DeAndre Smith, who left last week for a job at North Carolina.

Smith had been with Tony Sanchez‘s program for just three months or so, coming to Las Vegas by way of Purdue.

The past 10 seasons, Burkett served as an assistant at Cornell.  Prior to that, he was a graduate assistant at Bucknell.

This will be Burkett’s first job at any capacity at the FBS level.  His new employer added the following in announcing his addition:

At UNLV, Burkett inherits a rushing attack that stood 15th in the nation last fall with 241.5 yards per game, which ranked fourth in program history and was the most since 1979. All three of the team’s top rushers return in 2017.

Vandy turns to familiar face to fill coaching role of assistant fighting cancer

NASHVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 22:  Josh Crawford #22 of the Vanderbilt Commodores celebrates a touchdown against the Tennessee State Tigers scored by teammate Trent Sherfield #10 during the second half at Vanderbilt Stadium on October 22, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee.  (Photo by Frederick Breedon/Getty Images)
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With an assistant fighting a significant health issue, Derek Mason has turned to someone very familiar with the Vanderbilt football program to fill the coaching void.

Vandy confirmed Monday that Warren Belin has been hired as the Commodores’ outside linebackers coach. Belin will, at least temporarily, replace Osia Lewis, who stepped down from his job as he battles liver cancer. Lewis will transition into an of-field role within the program as he fights the disease.

The announcement came on the same day Vandy kicked off spring practice.

From 2002 through 2009, Belin was Vandy’s linebacker’s coach under Bobby Johnson. He was at Wake Forest in the same role from 2013-15.

Last season, he was with the Demon Deacons in an off-field role as director of high school relations.

Blocked from Pitt and Syracuse, Gus Edwards’ transfer from Miami to Rutgers is official

MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 13:  Gus Edwards #7 of the Miami Hurricanes rushes for a touchdown during a game against the Arkansas State Red Wolves at Sunlife Stadium on September 13, 2014 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
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In opting to leave Miami in late January, Gus Edwards was restricted by the university from transferring to two of his top choices in Pittsburgh and Syracuse as they were on this coming season’s schedule. A little over a month later, the Staten Island native, who wanted to transfer and move closer to home as he was a new father, has found his new college football home in the same area of the country.

On its official Twitter account earlier Monday, Rutgers announced that Edwards has transferred into the Scarlet Knights football program. As Edwards will be coming in as a graduate transfer, he’ll be eligible to play immediately in 2017.

The upcoming season will be the running back’s final year of eligibility.

Edwards was third on the team this past season in rushing with 290 yards. For his Hurricanes career, the 6-1, 230-pound back ran for 977 yards and 12 touchdowns on 186 carries.

A foot injury suffered in summer camp cost Edwards the entire 2015 season. He received a medical redshirt for that season.