New recruiting rule will restrict coaches-in-waiting

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Right about now, there are probably quite a few upset people in the offices of the Texas football program.

According to the Dallas Morning News, the NCAA recently approved a new rule that limits the amount of contact a designated coach-in-waiting can have with recruits.  Basically, the coach-in-waiting will be forced to recruit under the same guidelines as head coaches, meaning less visits with potential recruits than other assistants on the staff.

Here’s the relevant information from the NCAA on the restrictions that have previously applied to head coaches, and will now apply to their designated successors:

13.1.2.6 Head Coach Restrictions — Bowl Subdivision Football.


13.1.2.6.1 Assistant Coach Publicly Designated as Institution’s Next Head Coach. Aninstitution’s assistant coach who has been publicly designated by the institution tobecome its next head coach shall be subject to the recruiting restrictions applicable to theinstitution’s head coach.

B. Bylaws: Amend 13.1.8.4, as follows:

13.1.8.4 Limitations on Number of Evaluations — Football. In football, institutional staff membersshall be limited to three evaluations during the academic year during which the prospective studentathletecompetes or practices on any team. Not more than one evaluation may be used during the fallevaluation period and not more than two evaluations may be used during the April 15 through May 31evaluation period. An authorized off-campus recruiter may use one evaluation to assess theprospective student-athlete’s athletics ability and one evaluation to assess the prospective studentathlete’sacademic qualifications during the April 15 through May 31 evaluation period. If aninstitution’s coaching staff member conducts both an athletics and an academic evaluation of aprospective student-athlete on the same day during the April 15 through May 31 evaluation period,the institution shall be charged with the use of an academic evaluation only and shall be permitted toconduct a second athletics evaluation of the prospective student-athlete on a separate day during theevaluation period.


13.1.8.4.1 Head Coach Restriction — Spring Evaluation Period. In bowl subdivision football,during the April 15 through May 31 evaluation period, the head coach [and any assistant coachwho has been publicly designated by the institution to become the next head coach (seeBylaw 13.1.2.6.1)] shall not engage in off-campus recruiting activities, participating in off-campus recruiting activities, participating in an off-campus coaching clinic, visit a prospectivestudent-athlete’s educational institution for any reason or meet with a prospective studentathlete’scoach at an off-campus location.

Obviously, this new piece of legislation will affect Texas more than any other program in the country.

Will Muschamp was designated as the Longhorns’ coach-in-waiting in November of 2008.  He’s also one of the top recruiters in the country and one the reasons why the Longhorns pull in a Top Ten recruiting class year in and year out.

For those institutions and fans of the college football game who are against the idea of designating a coach-in-waiting, this is good news and one that we would think would all but eliminate the practice.

For Texas?  It sucks, to be blunt (Maryland too, I guess.).  But it will really have more of an impact on the Longhorns and seems to be a rule directed squarely at the school, even though it wasn’t as it was proposed by the Big East.

And Florida State can feel fortunate that it didn’t go into effect until after their best recruiter, Jimbo Fisher, officially took over for Bobby Bowden.

NCAA announces common-sense change to bowl selection process

SANTA CLARA, CA - DECEMBER 26:  Andy Janovich #35 of the Nebraska Cornhuskers jumps over Jayon Brown #12 of the UCLA Bruins during the Foster Farms Bowl at Levi's Stadium on December 26, 2015 in Santa Clara, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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The NCAA Division I council announced 5-7 teams will still have a chance to make a bowl this fall.

They will have to wait until all of the 6-6 teams have been picked, though.

The common sense rule tweak was announced Wednesday.

Nebraska, Minnesota and San Jose State all made bowls last season despite finishing the regular season 5-7, and coincidentally they all won.

In a statement, Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby, who serves as chair of the football oversight committee, said the postseason selection process “makes sense and is fair to the schools and the bowls.”

APR scores will continue to be used to designate which 5-7 teams are eligible to take up the bowl slots left available after all of the 6-6 teams have been selected.

After swelling to 41 games last season, the postseason is not set to expand again until at least the 2020 season as a result of a moratorium on the certification of new bowls was established by the council in April.

NCAA inquires about additional Sandusky victims from Penn State lawsuit

BELLEFONTE, PA - OCTOBER 09: Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky (C) leaves the Centre County Courthouse after being sentenced in his child sex abuse case on October 9, 2012 in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. The 68-year-old Sandusky was sentenced to at least 30 years and not more that 60 years in prison for his conviction in June on 45 counts of child sexual abuse, including while he was the defensive coordinator for the Penn State college football team. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
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Penn State and Joe Paterno‘s family have already done their part to return the tragic Jerry Sandusky saga to the news this year.

Now the NCAA apparently wants to join in.

The Centre Daily Times reports the college sports governing body has requested information regarding two men allegedly victimized by Sandusky, a long-time Penn State assistant coach, in the 1970s.

Their stories came to light in a court filing from a lawsuit involving Penn State and an insurer. The school tried to collect on a policy to help pay settlements it reached with more than 30 individuals who accused Sandusky of sexually abusing them.

The university tried to recoup money for those settlements from liability insurer Pennsylvania Manufacturers Association, but PMA challenged that in court. The two men’s cases were revealed in an order by Philadelphia Judge Gary Glazer that referenced their cases, years earlier than the 10 Sandusky was convicted of in 2012. One said he told Paterno.

The CDT story does not give any indication the NCAA might want to revisit the sanctions that were handed down in 2012.

Rather, it is looking for defense fodder in a defamation lawsuit filed by the family of Paterno, the legendary Nittany Lions head coach

The estate claims the college sports oversight group defamed the man who helmed the program from 1966 until his firing in 2011 after the Sandusky story broke.

A key point is the NCAA’s acceptance of the findings of the Freeh report, the university-commissioned investigation of the Sandusky scandal, which placed blame on four Penn State leaders, including Paterno, who died six months before it was released. The NCAA then levied historic sanctions on the university, including stripping 110 wins from the Nittany Lions, dropping Paterno from first place in the leaderboard for most wins by a Division 1 coach.

But in new documents, the NCAA says it needs the information about the two claimants to refute the estate’s defamation claims.

Sandusky was convicted in 2012, and some of the sanctions Penn State agreed to accept from the NCAA were gradually lifted in the following years.

While Sandusky reportedly continues to work on getting his convictions overturned, it’s not hard to imagine Sandusky’s victims and plenty of members of the Penn State community would prefer to move on from the tragedy — allowing both time to heal in whatever way is possible.

The same can most likely be said of current coach James Franklin, who took the job two-plus years ago after coach Bill O’Brien endured the brunt of the storm and maintained solid recruiting despite the sanctions.

During the spring, Franklin told CBSSports.com, “This is really year one for us in a lot of ways,” citing a return to having close to a full allotment of scholarships.

Concussion concerns lead Ohio QB Conner Krizancic to retire

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The concern over the long-term effects of concussions has prompted yet another college football player to give up the game.

According to the Twitter feed of the Lake County News-Herald‘s John Kampf, Ohio University quarterback Conner Krizancic has decided to retire from the sport of football because of concussion concerns.  Krizancic sustained a concussion in the Bobcats’ spring game earlier this year, the third concussion, including two in high school, he had sustained during his playing career.

Kampf confirmed the player’s decision through his father.

Krizancic originally signed with Minnesota as a three-star prospect in 2014, but the Gophers quickly moved the Ohio product to wide receiver. The desire to play quarterback led Krizancic to transfer from Minnesota to Ohio in January of 2015.

After sitting out the 2015 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules, Krizancic joined the Bobcats’ quarterbacking competition this past spring.  Post-spring, though, there had been talk of Krizancic moving back to receiver.

Two projected defensive starters among three suspended for Toledo’s first two games

BOCA RATON, FL - DECEMBER 22:  Head coach Jason Candle of the Toledo Rockets celebrates with player after the game against the Temple Owls at FAU Stadium on December 22, 2015 in Boca Raton, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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When Toledo takes the field for the first couple of games this coming season, they’ll do so a little lighter on the defensive side of the ball than expected.

First-year head coach Jason Candle has confirmed that linebackers Jaylen Coleman and Anthony Davis and defensive tackle Marquise Moore have been suspended for the first two games of the upcoming season.  The players will miss the season opener Sept. 2 against Arkansas State and the home opener against Maine Sept. 10 before being eligible to return for the following weekend’s game against Fresno State.

The only reason given by Candle for the suspensions was “violations of athletic department policies.”

Coleman started the first half of the 2015 season before a broken leg sidelined him for the final six games.  According to the Toledo Blade, he was the Rockets’ leading tackler at the time of the injury.

Moore played in all 12 games last season, while Davis played in four.

Heading into summer camp, Coleman and Moore would’ve been projected starters at their respective positions.