New book to allege major Miami violations; NCAA on standby


Far enough removed from the roaring eighties and nineties to make it seem like they were nothing but strangely entertaining visitors from a distant planet, the Miami Hurricanes have done a remarkable job over the past few years reshaping their off-field image, even as they have yet to come even remotely close to duplicating the on-field success of the halcyon days of the football program.

For all of the flak Randy Shannon has taken for his won-loss record, his police record and the way his players conduct themselves both on and off the field have been a stark contrast to Jimmy Johnson‘s ‘Canes.  Now, after all of the polishing done to the brand by Shannon and company, it appears someone with both a connection to the program and a sordid past is looking to tarnish what’s been gradually built over the years.

Former UM booster and convicted criminal Nevin Shapiro, the Miami Herald writes, is writing a book about the UM football program in which he alleges former Canes players committed major NCAA violations.

Shapiro spoke to the Herald from a jail in New Jersey, where he is awaiting sentencing next month on a $900 million Ponzi scheme that reportedly left upwards of 60 victims with losses totaling $80 million.  While Shapiro refused to go into the violations contained in the first draft of a book titled The Real U: 2001 to 2010: Inside the Eye of the Hurricane, he did identify players such as Jon Beason, Devin Hester, Antrel Rolle, Randy Phillips, Robert Marve and Kyle Wright as former ‘Canes he was close with.

Additionally, Shapiro claimed he was close with with Clint Hurtt, Miami’s former recruiting coordinator and assistant coach who left for a job at Louisville this offseason.

Shapiro has been lauded by as recently as five months ago for a $150,000 contribution he made for the university.  Now, the businessman is looking to tear down something he was once a part of, due in part to what seems like hurt feelings brought on by players blowing him off once they left The U for the NFL.

“This will be a tell-all book from a fan and booster perspective,” said Shapiro, who did not attend UM. But why write a book that will hurt UM?

“I want to make the average fan aware of what really exists under that uniform,” he said. “They might be great players, but they’re certainly not great people. I’m speaking of no less than 100 former players.” 

Shapiro, 41, is angry because “once the players became pros, they turned their back on me. It made me feel like a used friend.” He was motivated by “heartbreak and disappointment on behalf of the university, which I considered to be an extended part of my family.”

The NCAA is aware that allegations are forthcoming from Shapiro, but will not decide whether an investigation will be launched until they get their hands on the specific claims Shapiro will make.  “When reasonably reliable information has been obtained indicating intentional violations may have occurred, the enforcement staff will undertake a review of the information in order to determine the credibility,” NCAA spokesperson Stacey Osburn said when asked if they would act on the claims of a person serving time.

Shapiro hopes to have his book published by December.  Until then, it appears a shadow will be looming over a football program that, according to some, are on the verge of bursting back onto the national title chase scene this season.

Way to cast a pall, Shapiro.  Nice going.

In Baker Mayfield, Texas set to face yet another QB who wanted to be a Longhorn

Baker Mayfield
Associated Press

Jameis WinstonJohnny ManzielAndrew LuckRobert Griffin IIIJ.T. Barrett. Oh, don’t mind me. Just recounting the number of quarterbacks with ties to the Texas football program that never received a sniff from Bevo’s famous snout.

Add another to the list, perhaps the most inexplicable of all: Baker Mayfield.

Mayfield played at Lake Travis High School in Austin, a powerhouse program in a state that specializes in them. Lightly recruited out of high school (he reportedly held only an offer from Florida Atlantic), Mayfield and his family reached out to the nearby program to see if they’d take him as a walk-on.

They said no.

“They told us he had five scholarship quarterbacks, so there wasn’t any need of ‘Bake’ coming out there,” James Mayfield, Baker’s father, told George Schroeder of USA Today. “I popped off that they had five scholarship quarterbacks that couldn’t even play for Lake Travis. That’s where our relationship stalled out.”

On one hand, it utterly boggles the mind why Texas would decline a successful high school quarterback willing to pay his own way on to the team, especially considering the state of the position at the time. On the other, one would see why Mack Brown‘s staff would pass on a kid with only an offer from FAU who says UT’s quarterbacks couldn’t start for his high school team.

Instead, Texas signed Tyrone Swoopes and Mayfield enrolled at Texas Tech. He won the starting job as a true freshman, transferred to Oklahoma, walked on and then won the starting job there.

And now he’s set to face the hometown team he at one time wished he could play for.

Mayfield has completed 88-of-135 throws for 1,382 yards with 13 touchdowns and three interceptions – good for a 178.52 passer rating, which ranks fifth nationally – while adding 138 yards and four scores on the ground. His counterpart, redshirt freshman Jerrod Heard, has connected on 42-of-76 passes for 661 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions (131.74 passer rating) to go with a team-leading 67 carries for 318 yards and three touchdowns.

“As perverse as all this has been, he’s where he wanted to be,” James Mayfield said. “He’s living his dream. If he had to do it all over again, he’d do it, with the same outcome.”

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press

One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”

Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”