Fantastic finish for Friends of Coal Bowl

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Not to be confused with the Coal Bowl, the Friends of Coal Bowl has been all West Virginiain the nine meetings between the Mountaineers and Marshall. In the five meetingsprior to the establishment of the Friends of Coal Bowl, WVU had beaten Marshallby an average score of 50-10. The last four games have been slightly closer (35-11)with tonight’s match-up the closest since 1911.

For three and a half quarters it looked like Marshall University would steal theirfirst-ever victory against West Virginia. Ultimately, West Virginia would take theirfirst lead of the game during their first possession in overtime, and run away with itfor a 24-21 win and ownership of the Governor’s Cup.

With two 95-plus-yard fourth-quarter drives resulting in touchdowns and aconverted two-point conversion, the Mountaineers escaped with a victory over theThundering Herd Friday night at John C. Edwards Stadium.

West Virginia running back Noel Devine capped a 96-yard drive byscampering four yards into the end zone with 5:12 remaining in the game to bring thescore to 21-13.

Despite fumbling four times, Marshall limited costly mistakes, turning the ballover only once. But that lone turnover was the difference maker. Freshman Herdrunning back Tron Martinez fumbled and lost the ball on the WestVirginia four yard line with ten minutes to play. Instead of scoring a touchdownand going up 28-6, the Mountaineers’ ensuing drive resulted in Devine’stouchdown run.

The following Marshall drive lasted only four plays before Herd punter KaseWhitehead pinned the Mountaineers at their own two-yard line.

The entire game was a battle of field position. Whitehead had previously pinnedWest Virginia within their own five-yard line twice. The Mountaineersaverage starting spot was their own 26-yard line. As for the Herd, their averagestarting position was their own 31-yard line. Holliday once relied on his puntingunit rather than his kicking unit late in the game due to place kicker TylerWarner‘s career long of 37 yards.

Starting from their own two, the Mountaineers capped a fifteen-play, 98-yard drivewith a five-yard touchdown pass from Geno Smith to Will Johnsonwith just 0:12 remaining in the game. Wide receiver Jock Sanders hauledin the two-point conversion to tie the game at 21.

Earlier in the week, Marshall head coach Doc Holliday mentioned thatthis rivalry had not yet officially become a rivalry. “We have to win this gameat some point. For it to be a rivalry we have got to go win thatgame.”

Holliday is a former West Virginia assistant whom many thought shouldhave been named head coach upon current Michigan head coach RichRodriguez‘s departure from Morgantown. He has taken serious control of the program and has themheaded down the right path. They were embarrassed last weekend in a 45-7 loss toOhio State, but rebounded nicely tonight to almost beat a ranked opponent for thefirst time since 2003 (27-20 victory at Kansas State).

Once WVU started giving their playmakers the ball, they settled down. Star widereceivers Sanders and Tavon Austin caught eight of their combined 13passes in the second half, and Sanders added his two-point conversion catch as well.Devine added more than three-quarters of his rushing total in the second half andovertime period, along with his touchdown run.

In the overtime period, Mountaineer kicker Tyler Bitancurt added a fieldgoal on West Virginia’s first possession. When given the opportunity, Herd placekicker Warner failed to extend his career long to 40 yards, missing and losing thegame for Marshall.

Laremy Tunsil: ‘I’m just here to talk about the Miami Dolphins’

CHICAGO, IL - APRIL 28:  (L-R) Laremy Tunsil of Ole Miss holds up a jersey with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell after being picked #13 overall by the Miami Dolphins during the first round of the 2016 NFL Draft at the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University on April 28, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
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For those expecting Laremy Tunsil to expound on Thursday night’s revelation, you were sorely disappointed.

Friday evening, following a strange hiccup that involved a purported allergic reaction, Tunsil was introduced to the Miami media as the first-round pick of the Dolphins.  Not surprisingly, Tunsil was asked about the events of last night, from the gas-mask bong hit to the hacked Instagram account displaying damning text messages that could leave Ole Miss in further NCAA hot water to seemingly acknowledging in the affirmative during a post-draft press conference that he had received money from a Rebels staffer.

Not surprisingly, the sequel, Tunsil wasn’t touching last night’s developments.

“I’m just here to talk about the Miami Dolphins,” Tunsil responded in one variation or another when asked a handful of times about the video and potential NCAA issues.

In the aftermath of the allegations and admission, Ole Miss released a statement in which the university vowed to “aggressively investigate and fully cooperate with the NCAA and the SEC.”

UMass chancellor scoffs at talk of disbanding football

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This month we’ve already seen Eastern Michigan emphatically push back against faculty-fueled talk of moving the football program down to the FCS level or disbanding it completely.  Now it’s a former MAC member doing some pushing of its own on a similar effort.

Thursday, the faculty senate at UMass urged officials at the university to vote on a resolution “to end Division I football (Football Bowl Subdivision) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and either move to a different division or discontinue NCAA football altogether.”  That blast served as the latest salvo in a nearly four-year effort by the senate to rid itself and its university of the sport.

As has been the case in previous efforts, they appear to have failed miserably as the motion was defeated by a 2-1 margin.  Saying “[t]his is now the third time in my four years that they have brought up a motion and have not succeeded,” chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy went on to praise the direction of a program that is now a football independent after leaving the MAC following the 2015 season.

I think the program is in good shape and (headed) in the right direction,” he said. “This was simply a small group of senators who have been carrying on this agenda for some time. And they’re not getting the support they need. …

“I can’t control what the Faculty Senate does. It’s a waste of this important body’s time, in my opinion, to keep bringing up this issue. We have lots of issues on the curriculum and we have lots of issues on our future planning and so forth. So I think the academic senate’s time should be more wisely spent than debating something over and over again.”

Like their former conference counterparts at EMU, UMass has struggled mightily of late.  Since becoming full-fledged members of the FBS in 2012, the Minutemen have posted just eight wins versus 40 losses.

Despite those struggles, “we have strong support from the alumni base and our own student body,” Subbaswamy said, “which we’re going to build even more once we start playing even more games on campus.”

FCS LB Ray Lewis III, son of ‘Canes legend, charged with sexual assault

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A former member of the Miami Hurricanes football program — and the son of a U legend — is facing some rather significant allegations at his current football home.

WMBF-TV in Conway, SC, is reporting that an arrest warrant was issued for Coastal Carolina cornerback Ray Lewis III in connection to claims that he had sexually assaulted two women.  The FCS player turned himself into authorities earlier Friday and was charged with third-degree criminal sexual conduct.

The alleged incidents that led to the charges occurred in January.  From the television station’s report:

On Saturday, January 23, Conway Police officer responded to a local hospital, where the victims told police they were sexually assaulted at an apartment in the 2200 block of Technology Drive, according to a news release from the police department. Detectives were called to the hospital to take over the investigation.

Medical reports, victim statements, witness statements, and lab statements were presented to the solicitor’s office, and warrants were obtained for 20-year-old Ray Lewis III.

The arrest warrant alleges that Lewis did engage in sexual battery with an 18-year-old female with the knowledge that the victim was incapacitated and/or physically helpless from the use of drugs and/or alcohol.

Ray Lewis IIIThe 20-year-old Lewis, the son of UM Hall of Famer Ray Lewis, spent two seasons at his father’s alma mater without ever playing a down before transferring to Coastal Carolina in January of 2015.  In 2015 as a redshirt sophomore, the younger Lewis played in 12 games for the Chanticleers.

Suffice to say, he has been indefinitely suspended from the football team.

Coastal Carolina, incidentally, will be making the move from the FCS to the FBS level for the 2017 season.  It was announced in September of last year that the Chanticleers will join the Sun Belt Conference for football beginning that season.

A Travone Valentine return to LSU in 2016 now a possibility

BATON ROUGE, LA - OCTOBER 10:  Mike VI, mascot of the Louisiana State University Tigers, during pregame warmups before the game against the Florida Gators at Tiger Stadium on October 10, 2009 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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Back in January, Travonte Valentine was hoping Les Miles would give him another shot at a playing career at LSU. Specifically, Valentine was hoping that he’d get another shot at being a Tiger in 2017.

Not only does it appear Miles is ready to welcome the defensive lineman back, but that welcome could come a year earlier than expected. From the New Orleans Times-Picayune:

Currently enrolled at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Valentine was expected to become a 2017 prospect, but NCAA rules may allow him to suit up for LSU in 2016, according to numerous sources with knowledge of Valentine’s academic situation.

Valentine and other sources have confirmed that LSU has checked with its compliance department about what it would take for him to enroll this fall. Valentine, who is currently in good academic standing, has to maintain at least a 2.5 GPA, while completing the required number of course hours to qualify. The Tigers are taking a conservative approach to the situation, given the history between both parties, but multiple sources said the program is open to the idea if Valentine maintains his current course, and compliance decides that the transfer would meet NCAA guidelines.

Should Valentine ultimately return to Baton Rouge, it’d be the continuation of a lengthy — and bumpy — odyssey.

After signing with the Tigers in February of 2014, Valentine dealt with NCAA Clearinghouse issues — the player said another SEC program was the root cause — that forced him to miss the start of summer camp his true freshman season. While he was ultimately cleared to practice, he was not permitted to play in any games because of the lingering academic issues.

Then in April of last year, head coach Les Miles confirmed that Valentine had been suspended, with the specific reason being, again, academics.  At the time of his departure from the program, it was reported that Valentine, in addition to the academic issues, had failed multiple drug tests.

A four-star member of the Tigers’ 2014 recruiting class, Valentine was rated as the No. 3 defensive tackle in the country and the No. 7 player at any position in the state of Florida. He had been expected to be an immediate contributor to LSU’s line rotation.