Montana says ‘no thanks’ to WAC, Div. 1-A jump


As the WAC is set to add two football schools to their depleted ranks, the one school they were really hoping to grab has decided to stay put.

In a release issued by the school, Montana announced that they will stay in the Big Sky Conference and not make the jump from Div. 1-AA* to Div. 1 -A” at any point in the foreseeable future.  The Grizzlies have been in the midst of a feasibility study in an effort to gauge what it would take to move up a level in football, and were expected to make a decision in the next few weeks.

An invitation from the WAC was reportedly Montana’s for the taking, but the school has apparently decided the status quo is the proper course for its very successful football program at this point in time.

“It was a complex issue with many pros and cons,” said UM president Royce Engstrom. “In the end, the better course is to stay with the conference we helped establish in 1963 and to continue building on its solid foundation. …

“At this time, FCS football presents the best overall fit for the University, it provides our student-athletes and fans with a great experience, and it is consistent with the strategic direction of the University.”

Engstrom said in the statement on the school’s official website that there were three principles that guided his decision.

First, he wanted to maintain the cross-state rivalry between UM and Montana State University-Bozeman, which he regards as essential to the state’s cultural fabric. The two institutions played their first college football rivalry game in 1897. Now nicknamed the Brawl of the Wild, it’s the fourth-oldest active rivalry in the FCS and the oldest west of the Mississippi.

Second, he wanted UM to compete with more mission-similar institutions. He said the recent addition of the University of North Dakota strengthened the Big Sky Conference in that regard.

Finally, he wanted to ensure that UM athletic teams can compete successfully and maintain the prestige and integrity the program has demonstrated over the years.

The Grizzlies have been to the playoffs — Playoffs?  What are these college football playoffs they speak of? — a Div. 1-AA-record 17 straight seasons, and would certainly have been a quality addition to a conference in desperate need of such additions.

And, speaking of desperate additions, it was announced Thursday that Texas State and the University of Texas at San Antonio will be the seventh and eighth football members of the WAC, which will become the latest in a long line of conferences to reshape themselves over the past century-plus.

(Tip O’ the Cap: Bob Condotta of the Seattle Times)

(Writer’s note: I refuse to refer to the divisions of football by the names currently attached to them by the NCAA.  To borrow a line from one of the most underrated movies of all-time, “his momma called him 1-A/1-AA, I’ma call him 1-A/1-AA.”  Thank you, and have a nice day.)

Rutgers hires law firm specializing in NCAA violations; NCAA not digging around just yet

Kyle Flood
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The first month of the football season at Rutgers has had its share of off-field stories worth keeping an eye on, so the news on Tuesday that the university has hired Bond, Schoeneck & King, a law firm with a history of working on NCAA violation cases, is certainly a bit of an eye-opener. The NCAA is not, at this time, investigating Rutgers. Instead, this is a move to investigate a pair of concerns related to the football program so that they may be properly reported to the NCAA if and when needed.

“Rutgers has retained outside counsel with expertise in NCAA infractions to help identify any potential rules violations,” Rutgers senior vice president for external affairs Peter McDonough said in a report published by “This is an ongoing and rigorous process that helps us to identify any shortcomings, to self-report them as required by NCAA rules and to remedy them as best practices demand.”

According to the report from, Rutgers is focusing on one allegation of an arrested player failing multiple drug tests while on the team and accusations related to the program’s ambassador program. The name of the former player was not identified in the report. The ambassador program has come into scrutiny following the evolving case related to wide receiver Leonte Carroo.

The hired firm tends to serve as a liaison with the NCAA, but Rutgers will be given a final copy of the firm’s investigation for review. If Rutgers determines any NCAA violations were commited as determined by the report, that information will be passed on to the NCAA. The information revealed or uncovered in the firm’s investigation will determine if the NCAA will have to do some of its own digging, or merely adopt the firm’s report at face value and decide on any appropriate punishment from there.

Rutgers WR Carroo expected to have assault charges dropped

Leonte Carroo
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Rutgers wide receiver Leonte Carroo could have a charge of simple assault dropped by a New Jersey court today. The woman he is accused of slamming to the concrete has agreed to drop the restraining order request and has asked the assault charge against the Rutgers receiver be dropped as well. reports today the woman and Carroo each appeared in a family court on Tuesday, and the woman told the judge she is not scared of Carroo.

So, what does this mean for football? Simply put, it means Carroo may be eligible to play again as soon as this weekend. That would be good timing, as Rutgers is set to host Michigan State this Saturday night.

Carroo has been sitting out while serving an indefinite suspension while this legal process plays out. Carroo has missed each of the last two games for Rutgers, against Penn State and Kansas. Rutgers was off this past weekend. If this legal process does play out as it is expected at this point, Carroo could be reinstated quickly and promptly, making him eligible to return right away. Carroo is one fo the best players on the roster, so having him back and eligible to play is very good news for the Scarlet Knights offense.