And the Oscar goes to … players faking injuries to slow down Ducks!


“You love me! You really, really love me!”

For opposing teams this season, stopping Oregon’s mile-a-minute offense has been like trying to convince Allen Iverson that practice is important.

However, at one of the country’s most prestigious universities — California, Berkeley — a team of world-renowned football minds headed by Jeff Tedford has discovered the secret formula to slowing the effects of gettin’ yo butt handed to ya by Oregon’s high-flying rushing attack.

Fake an injury … or ten.

In what has to be one of the worst (or best?) acting jobs by a football player since O.J. Simpson in The Naked Gun, Cal defensive lineman Aaron Tipoti suddenly, um, “cramped” during the second quarter of the Ducks narrow 15-13 victory over the Bears. The “injury” stopped the clock and allowed Cal’s defense to regroup as Tipoti was attended to on the field and then helped gingerly to the sidelines.

Had the game been played in Autzen Stadium, the sound of over 50,000 collective boos would have been heard.

Duck fans have accused opposing players of creating phantom injuries more than once this year. The idea behind the conspiracy is that opposing teams fake injuries to not only give their defense a rest, but to disrupt the tempo of Oregon’s offense, which, at one point this season, was scoring a touchdown a minute.

That’s interesting. Do coaches teach their players to take breaks during two-a-days as well?

“If teams are doing that – and I don’t know if they are – then you basically have thrown up the white flag and said you can’t play at our pace,” Chip Kelly said.

And Kelly’s right. The job of the head coach is to game plan effectively against each opponent. If a team isn’t physically and/or mentally prepared to face their opposition, it is 100 percent the coach’s fault. Tedford denies telling his players to fake injuries, but oh, the beauty of the internet is astounding.

The 15 points scored by Oregon was by far the lowest of the season, so in some regards, Tedford’s supposed plan worked. Technically, nothing about faking injuries is illegal, either. The NCAA rule book simply states that “feigning injury will break down rather than aid in the building of the character of players.” Referees cannot call delay of game or unsportsmanlike conduct on fake injuries.

There’s also a billboard in Austin that says “Buzzed Driving = Drunk Driving”

Just because you may not be over the limit doesn’t mean you should drive.

Granted, fake injuries occur probably more than we know. A team needs a timeout during a potentially game-winning drive, so a player goes down. It happens, but it doesn’t make it right. In Oregon’s case, it should be considered downright cheating.

Rutgers reinstates WR Leonte Carroo to football team

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 28:  Wide receiver Leonte Carroo #4 of the Rutgers Scarlet Knights makes a touchdown catch on the first play of the game against the Washington State Cougars at CenturyLink Field on August 28, 2014 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

While the news of late has been littered with the exits of two SEC wide receivers, one team from the Big Ten is welcoming back a player who plays the same position.

In a press release, Rutgers confirmed that Leonte Carroo has been reinstated to the Scarlet Knights football program.  The release stated that head coach Kyle Flood, who is suspended himself, “reinstated Carroo after the student-athlete agreed to the conditions of his reinstatement and after he accepted the responsibility that comes with his return to the team.”

The reinstatement comes one day after a domestic violence charge against him was dropped after the alleged victim decided not to testify against he former boyfriend.  Carroo had been accused of slamming a woman with whom he had a previous relationship into the concrete outside of the RU football facility last month.

Carroo has missed the last two games (Penn State, Kansas) because of the suspension.  He will be eligible to return to practice today and play in Saturday’s game against 10th-ranked Michigan State.

Despite missing those two contests, Carroo is still tops on the team in receiving yards with 181 and tied for the team lead with three receiving touchdowns.  He’s also averaging nearly 26 yards per reception.

Carroo led the Scarlet Knights last season in receptions (55), receiving yards (1,086) and receiving touchdowns (10).

Pig Howard dismissed by Vols

KNOXVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 5: Pig Howard #2 of the Tennessee Volunteers fumbles the ball through the end zone during overtime of the game against the Georgia Bulldogs at Neyland Stadium on October 5, 2013 in Knoxville, Tennessee. (Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images)
Getty Images

It’s been a bad week for talented SEC wide receivers.

On the heels of Auburn giving the boot to D’haquille Williams following an alleged bar rampage, Tennessee announced Wednesday that Pig Howard has been dismissed from Butch Jones‘ football program.  Violations of unspecified team rules was the only explanation offered.

Howard had been suspended for the season opener for the same reason due to an unspecified incident several months before.  It’s unknown if the dismissal is related in any way to that suspension.

Injuries had allowed the senior to play in just two games this season, against Oklahoma and Western Carolina.  He had one reception for eight yards, with that coming in the overtime loss to the Sooners.

The past two seasons, Howard led the Vols in receiving with 54 and 44 receptions in 2014 and 2013, respectively.  He accounted for 1,006 receiving yards in that span, and has also scored a pair of rushing touchdowns.