Jimmy Burge

Mizzou d-lineman latest player hit with pot charge

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For the fourth consecutive day, news of a college football player on the wrong side of the law has surfaced.

This time around it’s Missouri facing the off-field legal situation, with the Columbia Tribune reporting that defensive tackle Jimmy Burge was arrested two weeks ago.

Specifically, the junior lineman was charged Jan. 17 with one count of possession of a controlled substance, a Class A misdemeanor.  Burge was arrested following a traffic stop in which an officer noticed the smell of marijuana wafting from Burge’s pickup truck.  A subsequent search revealed blast pipes, rolling papers, a grinder, 3 grams of marijuana and a shotgun in Burge’s vehicle.

The school is aware of Burge’s situation, and told the paper that any punishment will be handled internally.

Any punishment could also be fairly significant as this was Burge’s second arrest in less than four months; in early October, Burge was cited for drinking intoxicants while operating a vehicle.

Four-star OL JP Urquidez says he will not enroll at Baylor

during the Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic at AT&T Stadium on January 1, 2015 in Arlington, Texas.
Sarah Glenn/Getty Images
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Continuing an unfortunate trend for the Baylor football program over the course of the last week, Class of 2016 offensive lineman JP Urquidez announced he will not be enrolling at Baylor tomorrow morning as originally planned. Urquidez made the announcement via Twitter.

Rivals rated Urquidez as a four-star prospect out of Copperas Cove, Texas. The recruiting service ranked him the ninth-best offensive tackle in the country in the Class of 2016 and the 24th top player overall from the state of Texas. Urquidez sent a message of support to the recently indefinitely suspended (with the intent to terminate) Art Briles once the news became official.

Urquidez joins fellow Class of 2016 recruits of Baylor Patrick Hudson (another four-star offensive lineman) and four-star running back Kameron Martin in deciding not to enroll in the first summer session at Baylor. Others could soon join them as reports suggest four-star wide receiver Devin Duvernay already wants to move on to another program as well.

Baylor’s Class of 2016 ranked 17th in the nation according to Rivals, but in the wake of this latest scandal news the Bears are already seeing key ingredients of that class looking elsewhere at the final hour.There is not a whole lot that can be done by Baylor other than allowing those players a release from their

National Letter of Intent and offering them best wishes on their way out.

LSU’s Mike the Tiger begins radiation treatment at cancer center

BATON ROUGE, LA - OCTOBER 06:  LSU mascot Mike VI, a Bengal/Siberian mixed tiger, is displayed on the field before the Florida Gators take on the LSU Tigers at Tiger Stadium on October 6, 2007 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images)
Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images
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LSU is doing everything in its power to help take care of the lovable and symbolic Mike the Tiger. On Saturday, the live tiger mascot underwent anesthesia and was transported to Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center for radiation treatment for what the school previously announced was a rare form of cancer.

The cancer center has a long history of working with LSU’s School of Veterinary Medicine and has long assisted in consulting about animals  receiving radiation treatment at LSU. Basically, LSU trusts this cancer center to take care of their favorite tiger.

Mike went through a simulation process that will be used to create the best possible care plan for his treatment. The CT images taken will help to create a map of the tumor on Mike’s face during the planning of the treatment and will be used to later target the tumor in the hope of avoiding complications during the treatment process.

Today, as shared on the official Facebook page for Mike VI, the tiger has recovered from the anesthesia and was out and about to enjoy the weather.

Can Mike Sinlgetary save Baylor football?

WACO, TX - AUGUST 31:  A general view of play between the Southern Methodist Mustangs and the Baylor Bears at McLane Stadium on August 31, 2014 in Waco, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images
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In the days after Baylor rocked the football world with the firing of head coach Art Briles amid alarming controversy and the likely intent to wipe the slate clean after getting through the 2016 college football season, there is much anticipation to see who steps in to take over the suddenly startled Baylor football program. Whoever steps in to be the new permanent head coach in the years to come will do so knowing he is taking on an unenviable task at a program that has never had things come served on a silver platter.

Maybe Mike Singletary is just the man for the job?

Singletary’s name has come up at times in the recent days as the guessing game begins for figuring out who takes on the role of head coach of the Bears. Singletary should be Baylor’s next head coach, writes Jarrett Bell for USA Today. He is also already receiving some high praise and a recommendation from another familiar name in the football world, Pro Football Hall of Famer Kellen Winslow.

“Experience. Reputation. Ties to the school. He’s a good fit,” Winslow said. “They need to restore their credibility, as a school and with their football program. To do that, you need to change the whole culture.”

Hiring Singletary would be a drastic change of culture for the Baylor program, which has come under fire for operating under a terribly misguided football culture for the sake of winning games. Singletary is hard-nosed and would set a brand new tone and establish a new order at Baylor. Singletary has never coached in college football but has some experience at the NFL level. The former Super Bowl champion linebacker with the Chicago Bears was a head coach for the San Francisco 49ers for the 2009 and 2010 seasons before being removed in favor of then-Stanford head coach Jim Harbaugh. The majority of Singletary’s coaching career as been filled as an assistant with the Baltimore Ravens, 49ers and Minnesota Vikings.

A Baylor alum and member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame, Singletary would likely be well received by the Baylor community from the start. He would also command a level of respect from day one given his football background, but he would most certainly need a good offensive-minded staff around him to help balance out his defensive focus.

For now, Singletary is sitting on the sideline and hoping his university sorts out its issues to establish a firm path going forward. He has not shut down the idea of being a part of that plan, but he is not actively and publicly throwing himself at the front of the line for an interview.

“The most important thing for me to do is just wait and see what they’re thinking,” Singletary said. “We’ll just have to wait and see.”

Houston wants to keep options open rather than focus just on Big 12

HOUSTON, TX - DECEMBER 05:  Cameron Malveaux #94 of the Houston Cougars and Nick Thurman #91 kiss the AAC championship trophy after defeating the Temple Owls 24-13 at TDECU Stadium on December 5, 2015 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images
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The University of Houston wants a spot in the Big 12, but it will also look for ways to keep its options open just in case. The Houston Chronicle highlighted the current situation for the Univeristy of Houston as the ongoing Big 12 expansion rumor mill spins, with a few mentions of the Cougars popping up here and there.

“We want Houston to be at the top of that list,” said Hunter Yurachek, Houston’s vice president for intercollegiate athletics. Asked about focusing entirely on the Big 12, Yurachek said “I think that limits us. We have to keep all our options open.”

Aside from potential membership in the Big 12, which appears to be the top goal for Houston, the two other options mentioned by The Houston Chronicle include sticking with the American Athletic Conference and continuing to be a power player in what could be the top non-power conference (with the hope and dream of one day being considered a power conference with a new media deal in the future) or holding out for the Pac-12 in the event the conference wants to set foot in the state of Texas. That last option may be the biggest reach, but a school like Houston would be wise to keep every scenario on the drawing board.

“We’re thinking long term at the University of Houston,” Yurachek explained. “We’re not making these changes for the immediate future. These are investments for anything that can happen in the collegiate landscape, not just any decisions the Big 12 could make in their future meetings.”

If the Big 12 is going to expand, Houston has a good set of pros and cons to consider. Among non-power conference options, Houston is well-positioned for future success in a very attractive media market. Of course, the Big 12 already has a strong presence throughout Texas with the Longhorns. If the purpose is to expand viewership, as seems to be the case with many realignment moves, this is a big drawback for Houston and it is one they cannot overcome. Of course, the Houston market is starting to tune into more SEC football recently with the addition of Texas A&M. Houston could help regain a stronghold for the Big 12 in the Houston market, but then again so could a dominant Texas Longhorns program in all likelihood.

Houston leaders have now reportedly met with leaders at each of the current Big 12 members. It is clear Houston would jump at the opportunity to join the Big 12, just as TCU did after jumping from the Mountain West Conference to the Big East, where the Horned Frogs never played a down before accepting a Big 12 invite.If the Big 12 chooses to expand, which is still no guarantee to happen, Houston has plenty to offer as the program continues to grow.

If the Big 12 chooses to expand, which is still no guarantee to happen, Houston has plenty to offer as the program continues to grow. Whether adding Houston makes sense to the rest of the Big 12 is still up for debate, just as is the possible membership of other options like Cincinnati, UConn, UCF, Memphis and BYU.