With a half-dozen media members in tow, Big 12 opens expansion-free spring meetings

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Exactly one year ago today, as the Big 12 opened their annual spring meetings, commissioner Dan Beebe was asked what were the odds that not a single member school would up and leave the conference.

Very high,” the commissioner boldly stated.

Fast-forward 365 days, and with Nebraska set to officially join the Big Ten and Colorado the Pac-12 one month from today, the Big 12 opened this year’s version of their annual spring meetings to “slightly less” drama.  And even fewer people, both membership-wise and media-wise.

In perhaps the most stunning development, at least from our perspective, of the first day of the meetings, a grand total of six media members were in attendance.  Our guess as to the makeup?  Five of ’em were from Texas and the other from Nebraska, and that’s only because he/she forgot about the whole Big Ten thing.

Needless to say, the “subdued” media presence didn’t escape the notice of officials in attendance.

“We couldn’t get through that hallway out there last year,” Oklahoma athletic director Joe Castiglione said according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

With expansion (thankfully) off the docket this year, much of the talk on the first day of the meetings — and much like it was at the SEC’s spring meeting opener Tuesday — centered on Jim Tressel‘s resignation and the repercussions it may have for college football as a whole.  Even as some view The Vest’s inglorious tumble as one of the signs of some kind of collegiate football apocalypse, Beebe took a decidedly different tack when discussing the state of sports at the NCAA level.

Such matters, commissioner Dan Beebe said, represent “a big teaching moment for all of us” to re-examine compliance and standards on conference campuses.

Still, Beebe doesn’t believe the issues associated with OSU, football national champion Auburn, men’s basketball champion Connecticut and other prominent programs are an indication of corruption corroding college athletics.

“I think it’s a confluence of unfortunate events,” said Beebe, a former NCAA investigator. “There are some situations that are occurring that are body blows to what we’re doing … (but) I think you have to put it in context (with) where we are now.

“Maybe I’m being Pollyanish about this, but I don’t think it’s anywhere like where we’ve been in previous eras.”

Without naming the old Southwest Conference or Southern Methodist, which Beebe probed leading up to its death penalty, he recalled a “whole area” of the country in which there was “outright buying of players” and “academic fraud.”

On that point, Beebe is likely absolutely correct; the people from that era and that area of the country are quite likely quietly scoffing at the Tressel’s and Cam Newton’s of today’s game.

The commissioner is also correct on the level of scrutiny in this day and age of the Internet and social media, which shines a brighter — and longer and nearly instant — spotlight on situations such as what is currently going down in Columbus.

“It used to be I’d gumshoe around for quite awhile” before the media knew about allegations of impropriety, he said. “Now the media is out there first.”

And that’s part of the problem: the media has almost become an unpaid extension of the NCAA’s investigative arm.  It’s high time that the NCAA — and, specifically, the conferences who are pulling in unprecedented money from historic television deals — put additional investigators on the streets and get out ahead of the issues that exist.  Simply put, the 30-some individuals who make up the Association’s overwhelmed enforcement division are simply not enough given how massive, far-reaching and powerful the game has become.

Harbaugh hits primetime again as Michigan announces spring game under the lights

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Jim Harbaugh is already getting a series on Amazon Prime but now the Michigan head coach is also getting the primetime treatment.

The Wolverines announced on Tuesday that the annual spring game would take place under the lights at Michigan Stadium this year and would be televised live in primetime on the Big Ten Network.

Gates will open to the game two hours prior to kickoff and the maize and blue faithful may try to do their best to get to Ann Arbor early because the school is going to screen an episode of the Amazon series  “All or Nothing: The Michigan Wolverines” prior to the game. This will be the second time in three years that the school will go under the lights to play their spring game at night but obviously the first time there’s a documentary series that will be screened prior to the Wolverines taking the field.

The game may be worth tuning in for to see Ole Miss transfer Shea Patterson in action with his new team after arriving in the offseason. The NCAA still has not ruled on whether he will be immediately eligible in 2018 but he is expected to go through spring drills with the team either way, starting this week when practices begin on Friday.

After cutting four sports, Eastern Michigan says axing football is not “even an option”

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Prior to the arrival of current head coach Chris Creighton, Eastern Michigan football was annually one of the programs people wondered about at the FBS level due to low attendance, bad records and a gray field being one of the few notable aspects about the program. After all, the Eagles have won just one MAC title in the decades they’ve been in the league and went to only their second ever bowl game back in 2016.

While the fortunes of the team have become more positive in recent seasons, the topic of cutting football altogether or dropping down to the FCS ranks was brought up again in Ypsilanti this week after the school made the decision to cut four sports from the athletic department for budgetary reasons. While some might think EMU could continue slashing and eventually reach the football team, it appears that is thankfully not on the table.

“Football is not being cut,” said athletic director Scott Wetherbee, according to MLive.com. “No. 1, because I had a directive from our board of regents and the president, and we all agree we want to stay in the Mid-American Conference and we want to be a FBS Division I football team.

“It wasn’t even an option to look at that.”

That should settle that.

Wetherbee went on to said that the school receives several million dollars from just being a member of the MAC and having a football team is certainly a key part in remaining in the league. Money is a touchy subject around the university when it comes to athletics as just last year Eastern Michigan students campaigned against a $35 million football facility.

Despite the opposition and the most recent budget cuts though, it seems the school’s leadership is firmly behind Creighton and the Eagles remaining a part of life at EMU.

Former USC assistant coach wants to depose Mark Emmert as part of lawsuit against NCAA

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March Madness may not be the only thing on NCAA president Mark Emmert’s mind this week.

According to the LA Times, attorneys for former USC assistant coach Todd McNair are asking a judge to order Emmert to take part in a deposition with them prior to the start of the long-running legal case involving the association next month. The NCAA president had been scheduled to be deposed in February in Indianapolis but the session never appeared to come about.

“We suspect you are seeking it in order to harass President Emmert and place undue settlement pressure on the NCAA,” Kosta Stojilkovic, an attorney representing the organization, wrote in an email obtained by the Times.

McNair was a former running backs coach at USC and was one of the key links the NCAA used to levy heavy sanctions against the Trojans in the Reggie Bush infractions case nearly eight years ago. However McNair subsequently sued the NCAA not long after he was let go by the university, claiming that his career was ruined as a result of the case.

Documents that have slowly been released as part of the lawsuit have shown the Committee on Infractions did stray from protocol in the case in order to punish USC and after years of appeals, it seems McNair is finally getting his day in court not far from the campus where he once coached at. It remains to be seen if the most recent legal maneuvering on both sides will result in Emmert becoming part of the trial but, billable hours appears as though they will remain undefeated as both the NCAA and McNair redefine the motto ‘Fight On.’

College GameDay joins ESPN’s coverage of 2018 NFL Draft

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Not so fast NFL friends, College GameDay is crashing the party.

ESPN and the NFL league office announced on Wednesday that Kirk Herbstreit and the rest of the GameDay gang will be heading to Texas to cover the 2018 NFL Draft for the first time ever. While we’ve seen the crew setup shop for big games before at AT&T Stadium, this broadcast will be a little different with the excitement from fans coming about players leaving college.

“ESPN has presented the NFL Draft for nearly 40 years and we take great pride in finding new and exciting ways to continue to elevate and differentiate our coverage,” ESPN Executive Vice President Burke Magnus said in a statement. “The draft is the perfect intersection of college football and the NFL, so giving fans the opportunity to experience Round 1 through the lens of College GameDay makes perfect sense.”


The team should have plenty to discuss next month in Dallas between presumptive No. 1 overall pick Sam Darnold and human highlight reel Saquon Barkley out of Penn State likely going atop the draft. If you’re annoyed at some of the NFL analysts who are dropping analysis that doesn’t quite lineup with what you’ve seen on the gridiron the past few years in college, this is certainly a nice new option to have when it comes to the opening night of the draft.