Mike Leach

Mike Leach comes out swinging his book sword


As he’s well-known for his fondness of pirates along with many other eclectic/meteorological leanings, it should come as little to no surprise that Mike Leach‘s new book is titled, in part “Swing Your Sword”.

It should also come as no surprise whatsoever that, within the pages of the book, Leach comes out swinging at the school that fired him and the helicopter dad who (allegedly) orchestrated it.  And he pulls no punches and minces no words in doing so.

Leach was fired by Texas Tech in late December of 2009, ostensibly due to his “treatment” of Red Raider wide receiver Adam James — son of ESPN college football analyst/aspiring politician Craig “Black Hawk” James — and the subsequent injunction he sought against the university after they had suspended him for Tech’s bowl game.  While that was his former employer’s public stance, it was long thought by many, including ourselves, that the seeds of Leach’s dismissal were planted months prior to his firing during what were contentious contract negotiations, with the James episode — and subsequent smear campaign — merely serving as an “easy out” for the school publicly.

Based on one excerpt released today, that was exactly how the situation appeared to one of Tech’s regents, who expressed embarrassment via an email to the vice chairman of the Texas Tech University Board of Regents as to how Leach was treated:

… Also, on the day of my firing, former regent Windy Sitton confirmed that my termination had nothing to do with the Adam James situation, but resulted from the ill will generated by the 2009 contract negotiations.

She wrote an email to Jerry Turner that we obtained:

“Jerry, I know his firing has been in the works since the Chancellor and the AD were outmaneuvered by Leach. That is our problem.

“The problem rests with the arrogance of the Chancellor and the ineptness of the AD. Everyone sees through this injustice to Mike Leach and Texas Tech. The Sitton family has given scholarships and have had multiple seats since 1976. We will not renew our options [on] our 12 seats or for that matter our PSLs for Basketball. This whole thing smells, and we do not want to be a part of this blight on Texas Tech.”

In another excerpt that deals specifically with the James Gang (our description), Leach at one point states that his “biggest regret was not cutting Adam James. … We thought he may have simply been the victim of his dad’s little-league father tendencies, and that he’d eventually find a way to be his own, independent person. But that didn’t turn out to be the case. I should’ve cut my losses, but I was really hoping that he’d improve and stuck with him.”

Leach also wrote of Adam James’ sense of entitlement and lack of work ethic, allegations that were first aired shortly after the infamous “electrical closet” incident came to light.

He could’ve fit into the role of tight end for us, but because he didn’t work hard he was only marginally effective. We could never get him to move out from behind his father’s coattails. Together, they believed that playing time was determined by politics and influence rather than hard work.

The excerpt goes on to detail the events surrounding the infamous Adam James episode, including Craig James — the ESPN employee — calling Tech chancellor Kent Hance — the one accused of arrogance in Sitton’s email — demanding that Leach be fired.

I’d highly recommend reading both excerpts in their entirety, although, obviously, it should be noted that this is one individual’s version of the events that transpired in December of 2010, albeit a version backed up by court depositions, emails and other various forms of little things called “facts”.

Steve Spurrier discusses retirement; Gamecocks name Shawn Elliott interim coach

Steve Spurrier

Odds are pretty good Steve Spurrier has coached his final game as the Head Ball Coach, but Spurrier let it be known he is not going to go away quite as easily as you might think. Spurrier addressed the media today as South Carolina made its transition between coaches official. Spurrier noted he is resigning as head coach, but he is not necessarily retiring. As previously reported, Shawn Elliott will take on the role as interim head coach of the Gamecocks effective immediately.

The first thing Spurrier wants to remind everybody is he is not retiring. This is simply a resignation from his current position. Spurrier left the door open to possible options down the road for him in his post-coaching career. The idea of Spurrier walking away from the football world never to be heard from again is a startling one, so it is good to know he is not going to let that happen.

“College football is a game of recruiting, as well know,” Spurrier said when assessing why it was right for him to leave his job now. “That’s another reason I need to move on. I don’t know if coaching is completely over or not. It is fun being on a team. I might be a consultant for someone. I doubt if I’ll be a head coach again, but who knows?”

Spurrier said he realized Sunday the time to walk away was now and explained he always knew he would need to step aside the moment he saw himself holding the program back. That echoes the sentiment he has shared over the years, especially when asked about coaches like Joe Paterno and Bobby Bowden as they each got up in the years. This season South Carolina is off to a 2-4 start, so the writing was on the wall for Spurrier, who also said it was in the best interests for all if an inevitable change was handled immediately.

“We’ve slipped. It’s my fault. I’m the head coach,” Spurrier said of South Carolina’s recent struggles.”We haven’t lost it. We’ve got a dang good team.”

“Our team is not in shambles despite what some might say,” Elliott said when he was given a chance to speak to the media. “We’re going to do everything we can to make the University of South Carolina proud of this football program.”

Elliott will now have the rest of the season to show what he can do as a head coach, and he knows this will be a bit of an open audition for the job as South Carolina starts searching for its next head coach.

Mark Dantonio quickly tosses aside South Carolina discussion

Mark Dantonio

Michigan State has become a national power under the coaching of Mark Dantonio. The grizzled and confident coach has put together a master plan in East Lansing and has taken the Spartans to the top of the Big Ten along the way, capturing a Big Ten title and victories in the Cotton Bowl and Rose Bowl as well as in-state dominance over the Michigan Wolverines. Danotnio is preparing his Spartans to take on the Wolverines this week, but with the new vacancy opening up at South Carolina following the sudden retirement of Steve Spurrier, Dantonio has already been presented with the question about his thoughts on coaching at South Carolina.

He did not seem all that interested in discussing the vacancy when meeting with Michigan State media this morning.

“Coach Spurrier’s had an outstanding career there, it’s alma mater, and we’re here to talk about Michigan,” Dantonio said when asked about it today. Video below from the Big Ten Network

Dantonio played defensive back for the Gamecocks in the mid 1970s, which helps make Dantonio an interesting name to mention in any coaching future discussion out of Columbia. While Dantonio may have played at South Carolina for Jim Carlen, Dantonio grew up in Ohio and has coached the bulk of his career within Ohio and the Big Ten. He is also one win away from picking up his 100th career coaching victory, 81 of which have come at Michigan State.