texas tech

Texas Tech president: Pac-12 invite likely not coming

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It feels bizarre to think that somehow Texas A&M could be a catalyst for a shift in the college football landscape, but here we are, anxiously awaiting word from College Station about their affiliation intentions — one way or the other.

If the Aggies left for the SEC, one of the fallout questions would be the future of the Big 12. Would it disband? Or, would it expand? The official word from Big 12 officials from over the weekend was that the nine other members valued A&M’s presence, but would stick together if the Aggies departed.

Replacing A&M in such a situation would be difficult, but commissioner Dan Beebe has already outlined preliminary discussions if a need for a replacement came to fruition.

Shedding some light on the situation was Texas Tech president Guy Bailey, who appeared on KJTV 950 AM in Lubbock.

“If A&M leaves, we’re going to use this opportunity to build one of the strongest conferences in the United States,” Bailey said. “What we’ll do, we’re going to be very aggressive in recruiting schools and I don’t know how many we’re eventually going to recruit, we’ll need to work with FOX and our other media partners in doing this.

“In the past we’ve sort of been reactive, I think the nine remaining members of the Big 12 have decided that the reactive behavior – it’s time to get rid of that. It’s time to be proactive and I think you’ll see a very proactive approach… I think you ought to think of conference realignment with the Big 12 being one of the cornerstones.”

As far as finding a replacement for the Aggies — and Bailey really makes it sound like he expects A&M to leave — Houston, BYU, Air Force and Louisville have all been mentioned as potential candidates, with BYU gaining the most momentum as of late.

Notre Dame has also been thrown around the rumor mill. For what it’s worth, Notre Dame AD Jack Swarbrick and Texas AD DeLoss Dodds are very close.

Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe has stated previously that a 10-member Big 12 is the ideal situation moving forward, but the terms “aggressive” and “proactive” would certainly indicate that more options are possibly on the table. At this point, though — and we’ve stated it before — there just aren’t a lot of great candidates from which to choose.

Apparently, the same could be said for Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott.

Bailey insists that another invite from Scott doesn’t appear on the horizon, largely due to a package deal that would feature Texas, and the Longhorn Network, as cornerstones. Scott already denied Texas a chance at their own network once, and most other Big 12 members are attached to the Longhorns by the hip.

Or, since it’s Texas, big ol’ belt buckle.

“Here’s the deal, what the Pac-12 offered last year, and I think they would be open to this year, is a package deal,” Bailey said. “You’d have to have four schools and Texas is the cornerstone to that. Remember, the issue last year came down to the Longhorn Network. The University of Texas wanted its own network for tertiary rights and the Pac-12 doesn’t allow that. We can cut that out right there. I don’t foresee that happening.”

(Big thanks to the Dallas Morning News for the quotes)

Penn State confirms dismissal of DT Kamonte Carter

UNIVERSITY PARK, PA - SEPTEMBER 14:  Nittany Lion, the mascot of Penn State, rallies the team while in the endzone during the NCAA football game against Nebraska at Beaver Stadium in University Park, Pennsylvania on September 14, 2002. The Penn State Nittany Lions defeated the Nebraska Huskers 40-7.  (Photo by Rick Stewart /Getty Images)
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As NFL teams are busy adding former college football players, one program at this level is busy turning one of its current players into a former one.

Earlier today, 247Sports.com reported that Kamonte Carter had been dismissed from the Nittany Lions for violating unspecified team rules.  A short while later, the football program confirmed the development.

And, according to the school, the redshirt freshman defensive tackle was on the receiving end of James Franklin‘s boot more than a week ago.

“Kam Carter was informed on April 21 that he is no longer a member of the Penn State football team for a violation of team rules,” the university said in a statement. “We appreciate Kam’s contributions to the program and wish him success in the future.”

Carter was a four-star member of the Nittany Lions’ 2015 recruiting class, rated as the No. 5 player at any position in the state of Maryland and the No. 238 player overall in 247Sports.com‘s composite rankings.  The 6-4, 305-pound lineman took a redshirt as a true freshman.

The Centre Daily Times writes that Carter “was expected to see some time in the defensive line rotation this fall as a backup.”

Monte Seabrook becomes second Utes receiver to transfer this year

LAS VEGAS, NV - DECEMBER 20:  Utah Utes cheerleaders and mascot Swoop (R) run with flags as they celebrate the team scoring a touchdown against the Colorado State Rams during the Royal Purple Las Vegas Bowl at Sam Boyd Stadium on December 20, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Utah won 45-10.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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Yes, two Utes.  Happy?  Feel better?

Back in February, Delshawn McClellon announced on Instagram that he had decided to transfer out of the Utah football program.  Fast-forward two months and another player from the same positional group has taken to social media to announce a change, with Monte Seabrook confirming on his personal Twitter account that he too is transferring from the Utes.

It’s believed Seabrook’s decision was triggered by a desire for a better opportunity at playing time.

Seabrook began his career with the Utes as a defensive back before moving on to running back and ultimately settling in as a receiver. After playing in eight games as a true freshman, Seabrook didn’t see the field at all in 2015.

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, Utah’s coaching staff is helping Seabrook find a new program with which to continue his career.

Oregon to wear ’16 uniforms in spring game — 1916 uniforms

1916 Oregon Ducks
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Oregon, for better or worse, has become (in)famous for its vast collection of futuristic uniforms and the various combinations that annoy the living hell out of purists and dammit what have I told you kids about my lawn.

Instead of the standard look ahead, however, the Ducks are giving a nod to the past this weekend.

Oregon will take the field this afternoon for their annual spring game, and the players will do so with uniforms that pay homage to the 1916 version of the Ducks. That team went on to appear in the football program’s first Rose Bowl game at the end of that season and are certainly deserving of this type of nod.

I could take or leave the Nike-fied duds — the school’s original color scheme I’d begrudgingly acknowledge I like if I allow my inner fashion designer to grab the keyboard — but I could really get behind the sub-nickname “Webfoots” gaining traction and wider usage.

Report: Baylor’s Art Briles pulled in nearly $6 million in pay for 2014

WACO, TX - OCTOBER 24: Baylor Bears head coach Art Briles watches his team before the Iowa State Cyclones take on the Baylor Bears at McLane Stadium on October 24, 2015 in Waco, Texas. (Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images)
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Myriad off-field issues have dogged Art Briles‘ Baylor program of late, but at least the Bears head coach can take comfort in the fact that he’s very well compensated.

As Baylor is a private university, they are not forced to release coaching salaries, although those details are available via federal tax returns. The last known salary for Briles was $3.6 million for the 2013 calendar year; according to the tax returns for 2014 obtained by USA Today, Briles salary for that calendar year jumped to more than $5.3 million.

When all of Briles’ compensation is taken into account, he earned just a shade over $5.9 million for 2014.

In the USA Today coaching salary database for 2015, Briles would’ve been the highest-paid coach in the Big 12, ahead of Oklahoma’s Bob Stoops ($5.4 million).  He also would’ve been the third-highest paid head coach in all of college football, trailing only Alabama’s Nick Saban ($7.087 million) and Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh ($7.004 million) in total compensation.  Ohio State’s Urban Meyer, at $5.86 million, sits in that No. 3 spot.

Per the tax returns obtained by the website, Briles earned $540,000 in bonuses and incentives; how those were broken down wasn’t detailed in the returns.  Briles received another $28,000 in retirement and other deferred compensation, as well as $5,000 in apparel from Nike.

As for the lag in the numbers for Briles and why the 2015 financials are not available, USA Today explains it thusly:

Because private schools are organized as non-profit organizations, they must annually file a tax return that includes information about the pay of their most highly compensated employees. Although the returns mostly cover fiscal years that involve parts of two calendar years, the IRS requires that the compensation reporting cover the most recently completed calendar year.

Due to the complexity of their returns, large colleges and universities routinely take filing extensions that result in a significant time lag between the period covered by their most recent return and the date they file.

Baylor’s new return covers a tax year from June 1, 2014 through May 31, 2015, making 2014 the most recently completed calendar year.