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The Fifth Quarter: Week 2 Rewind

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As is always the case every week, any omission below is not on purpose, it’s merely intentional.

WINNERS

The United States of America
Exactly 10 years ago today, this great country of ours fell victim to the most devastating terrorist attack in the nation’s history.  There will be many ceremonies, remembrances and vigils honoring the memories of the thousands lost that day, and the thousands lost in the wars and conflicts that followed.  Needless to say, it was significant blow to the country, and its effects are still being felt 3,650 days later.  The thing is, they may have knocked those towers down, they may have staggered us for a bit, but we’re still here.  Why?  Because that’s what we do.  And that’s how we honor those lost in the despicable, cowardly attack, by never, ever giving up and never allowing those that want to bring us down to reach their objective.  So, as you go about your day today, watching the start of the NFL season and/or replaying Week 2 of the college season, take a minute or two to say a little prayer for the lives lost that day and the countless family members affected every day since by their loss.  And never, ever forget that day.

Now THAT is an instant classic
Ben did an excellent job recapping the epic first night game in the history of Michigan Stadium, but we’d be remiss in not at least mentioning the instant classic between Notre Dame and Michigan.  Quite honestly, though, I’m not exactly sure what the hell it was I witnessed.  I know it was historic; three touchdowns in the final 1:12 of the game — including Michigan’s winning score with two seconds left — screams once-in-a-generation finish.  Other than that?  I don’t know.  For the second straight game, Notre Dame put up over 500 yards of offense — and lost.   Of course, five turnovers, the bane of the Irish the first two games, will tend to negate chunks of yardage being gained, regardless of how huge they are.  The Irish entered the fourth quarter with a 24-7 lead — and were promptly outscored 28-7 in the fourth to lose 35-31.  So, should we remember it as an Irish collapse of epic proportions or a comeback for the ages for the Wolverines?  I don’t know about you, but I’ll simply remember it as one helluva college football game.

It’s over, Nicky; it’s over!
We stumped after last week’s opener for Nick Saban to pull the trigger and name A.J. McCarron as his starting quarterback going into the game with No. 23 Penn State and beyond.  That didn’t really happen — McCarron did start, though —  but, headed out of the game with the Nittany Lions, there’s no reason to delay the inevitable — McCarron has earned the right to be No. 3 Alabama’s starter at QB for the foreseeable future. McCarron didn’t exactly light up the scoreboard, but he did complete over 60 percent of his passes for nearly 200 yards, a touchdown and, most importantly, zero interceptions in the 27-11 win.  In fact, McCarron may actually have locked up the starting job without Saban saying a word publicly; backup Phillip Sims, who split series evenly with McCarron against Kent State, did not attempt a single pass, thus signaling that this really is McCarron’s team.  Well, for now, at least.

Well-deserved Bray-se for Vols QB
When Tyler Bray wasn’t even named third-team All-SEC in the preseason, we were one of a handful of people who openly questioned the logic surrounding the voting.  Saturday, Bray made me look like a genius.  Or less of a dolt.  One of the two, anyway, as all Bray did was throw for 405 yards and four touchdowns in Tennessee’s 45-23 win over Cincinnati.  The best part of the performance?  It allowed the Vols to open the season at 2-0, the first time that’s happened since 2006.  It also shows that, despite a rocky start on, um, Rocky Top, Derek Dooley and his coaching staff may finally have the UT football program headed in the right direction.  Especially with the caliber of player under center they’ll have for the next couple of years.

The real (next) McCoy
For a season plus a couple of games, Texas fans have been calling for the head of quarterback Garrett Gilbert on a platter, silver or not.   Longhorn Nation got their wish Saturday.  And a win as well.  After struggling yet again — two interceptions in eight attempts — Gilbert was yanked during the second quarter of UT’s game with BYU and replaced by a combination of Case McCoy, brother of Colt, and David Ash.  The passing duo combined to complete 9-of-11 passes for 92 yards and no picks.  The No. 24 Longhorns scored all of their points in the 17-16 win with McCoy and Ash in control of the offense.  It’s expected McCoy will start next week against UCLA, with Ash once again serving as the change-of-pace option at the position.

Fat Guy Heisman’s in the bag
One of my greatest joys in watching the game of football is a fat guy — an offensive or defensive lineman — scoring a touchdown.  When one of them single-handedly scores two of them in one game, and does it the way Melvin Ingram did in No. 12 South Carolina’s 45-42 win over Georgia?  That’s Christmas in summertime, my friends.  Ingram’s second TD was a rather ho-hum affair, a five-yard fumble return for a score.  His first one, however, was the stuff legends are made of.  On a fourth-and-17 from their own 32, Steve Spurrier called for a fake punt — for Ingram.  All the 280-pound lineman did was rumble 68 yards for a score that gave the Gamecocks a 14-13 lead, showing moves that belied his rather large frame.  We don’t know what’s the most amazing part of that score — the fact that it was a defensive lineman doing the scoring or the fact that Spurrier had the testicular fortitude to call a fake punt from his own 32-yard line.  And call it for a fat guy.

Happy bicentennial, coach!
It likely wasn’t prettier than but a handful of the previous 199, but No. 11 Virginia Tech’s 17-10 win over East Carolina still counts as the 200th in the underappreciated Hokies career of Frank Beamer.  While the Hokies outgained the Pirates by a nearly three-to-one margin in total yards, they committed two turnovers and committed 12 penalties — to just one for ECU — in the sloppy affair.  Still, a win is a win is a win and the 200th for Beamer, who deflected the postgame praise he received. “Like I said all week, I’m a fortunate guy to have had a lot of good people around me,” Beamer said. “And the school hung with me when things weren’t so good.

Loser gets the trophy though, right?
When it came to the Iowa-Iowa State rivalry, all of the talk the last month was about the God-awful trophy that was thankfully replaced on an interim basis by this.  Even more thankfully, there was a helluva football game that pushed trophy discussion even further in the background.  In a three-overtime thriller, the Cyclones were on the winning end of a 44-41 score over the Hawkeyes.  One of the greatest names to ever play the quarterback position, Steele Jantz, led the way for ISU’s improbable victory, throwing for 279 yards and four touchdowns

That’s just a pane in the glass
We touched on this earlier, but if this isn’t a winner I don’t know what is.  Short recap, then the clip: Auburn’s eagle Spirit attempted — and completed — a head butt of a luxury box’s window during its ritual flight into Jordan-Hare Stadium ahead of the game with No. 16 Mississippi State.  And lived to tell about it.  Here’s the visual proof:

AARPers unite!
Last week, a 17-year-old quarterback from Louisiana Tech earned a spot in the winners portion of The Fifth Quarter.  This week, we head to the extreme opposite end of the age spectrum to find another winner .  In NAIA Faulkner’s season opener, 61-year-old Alan Moore became the oldest player in the history of college football to play in a game.  Moore, who has five grandchildren, attempted and made an extra point in the game.  In a fitting coincidence on the 10th anniversary of the attacks on 9/11, Moore is a Vietnam vet whose first collegiate football career was cut short by that war.

LOSERS

Good guy, big trouble
Right or wrong, the 45-42 home loss to South Carolina has ratcheted up the pressure on Georgia’s Mark Richt.  And cranked up the temperature of his hot seat exponentially.  Granted, the Bulldogs opened up the season against No. 5 (Now No. 4) Boise State and No. 12 South Carolina, but that will do little to stop the board members dressed in wolves clothing from howling outside UGA’s doors.  Especially after last year’s 6-7 mark.  And after the first 0-2 start of Richt’s tenure.  The schedule certainly allows for a turnaround — the next two games are against Coastal Carolina and Ole Miss, and their highest-ranked opponent left is No. 16 (for now) Mississippi State — that could very well turn the jeers raining down on the Bulldogs Saturday into cheers by season’s end.  Whether because of an easier schedule or better play or a combination of both, something needs to happen between now and the end of November to ensure a 12th season in Athens.

The wailing and gnashing of lost bets could be heard for miles…
Leading 17-14 with 11 seconds left in the first-ever Pac-12 conference game, USC blocked the potential game-tying field goal and returned it for a the win-sealing touchdown.  The score was initially disallowed as the Trojans were penalized when the team poured onto the field immediately after the block.  No big deal, though, as the Trojans won the game anyway, right?  If you didn’t have money on the game, right.  If you did, it could’ve been very, very wrong.  The spread for the game closed with USC as anywhere between 7.5 and nine point favorites.  At first, those degenerates that took USC and gave up the points were out some cash as the Trojans didn’t cover without the score.  Then, over an hour after the game had ended, the Pac-12 announced that the TD did indeed count and the final score would be 23-14.  So, while some of those that took USC and gave up the points were ecstatic with the reversal and a win or a push, those that took the Utes and the points suddenly found the fresh cash they thought they’d won ripped from their pockets.  Don’t know about you, but I’ll bet they weren’t happy.

Woeful against Wofford
Clemson 35, Wofford 27.  When you’re in a BcS conference and you barely escape against a Div. 1-AA school — at home, no less — by a margin of a touchdown and two-point conversion, you land square in the middle of the “Losers” bracket of The Fifth Quarter.  The Tigers may be 2-0, but the seat on which head coach Dabo Swinney‘s backside resides is quietly getting warm to the touch (we’ve heard)(not that there’s anything wrong with that).   And it doesn’t get any better for Clemson next week; after unimpressive performances against schools from the Sun Belt Conference and 1-AA, the Tigers will welcome a suddenly rejuvenated Auburn Tigers football team into Death Valley Saturday.

Katz gotta hurt
Entering the 2011 season, Ryan Katz was the unquestioned leader of the Oregon State offense.  Two games and two embarrassing losses into the new year, Katz is apparently on the outside of the huddle looking in as the Beavers appear to have given the keys of the offense over to Sean Mannion.  As noted by Ben in the aftermath of the bludgeoning, Katz was used very sparingly in the drubbing at the hands of No. 8 Wisconsin, while Mannion by most accounts acquitted himself well despite the 35-0 loss.  By all appearances, it will be Mannion under center for the foreseeable future as the Beavers attempt to turnaround what’s been a horrendous start to the season.

Michigan State specifically, mankind as a whole
“But the No. 17 Spartans easily downed FAU 44-0,” you say.   Then you learn that The Situation from Jersey Shore infamy, per MSU athletic director Mark Hollis, has decided to be a Spartans fan this season and was on the sidelines for Saturday’s game.  Honestly, there are no winners in this sobering development.

Commonwealth of Kentucky football
Friday night, Louisville was embarrassed by Florida International of the Sun Belt in a loss.  Saturday afternoon, Kentucky was being embarrassed by Central Michigan of the MAC — the Wildcats were outgained 383-344 — before pulling away for the 27-13 win in the second half.  Next weekend, Louisville and Kentucky will play their annual in-state rivalry game.  Why is an image of a couple of first-grade girls pulling each other’s hair on the playground popping into my head when I think of what that clash will look like?

The NCAA
You’re not going to count the individual and team statistics from the weather-shortened Michigan-Western Michigan game opening weekend, but you’re going to count the win for the Wolverines?  Really, NCAA?  The again, this is The Association we’re talking about, so never mind.  Makes perfect sense.  Carry on.

ODDS & ENDS

— Minnesota suffered a scare very late in its 28-21 loss to New Mexico State as head coach Jerry Kill suddenly collapsed on the sideline.  After being tended to by medical personnel and taken to a local hospital, the first-year coach was listed in stable condition after suffering what the school described as a seizure.  Kill is expected to make a complete recovery.

— Starting quarterback Tyler Wilson was knocked out of No. 14 Arkansas’ 52-3 win over New Mexico with concussion-like symptoms.  The injury is not to believed to be serious enough to keep him off the field in the ensuing weeks, but it bears noting and keeping an eye on.

— After carrying the ball twice in the first quarter, Florida running back Jeff Demps left the game with a shoulder injury and did not return.  It’s not like the No. 18 Gators needed his services any further, however, as UF rolled to a 39-0 win over UAB.

— Is Washington State on the rise?  At least offensively they appear to be.  In the first two games of the 2011 season, Wazzu has scored 123 points; in 2010, Wazzu didn’t reach that point total until the third quarter of their sixth game.  Of course, they’ve faced Div. 1-AA Idaho State and should-be-Div. 1-AA UNLV, but still.  Where this program’s been for the past few years, they’ll take any sunshine amid the clouds they can get.

– On ESPN‘s College Gameday show, Kirk Herbstreit picked Cincinnati to go down to Knoxville and beat Tennessee.  Herbstreit, who left his lifelong home in Columbus in part because of the way he was treated by a small portion of Ohio State fans, now lives in Tennessee.

— Penn State burned their third timeout with 9:23 remaining in the first quarter of their loss to Alabama.  We’re certain there’s some kind of Joe-Pa/age joke in there somewhere, but we’ll just let it go and move on.

— The first night game in the history of Michigan Stadium drew 114,804 fans, a new school record.

FOR STATISTICAL PURPOSES ONLY

— In two games as a Wisconsin Badger, Russell Wilson has completed 79.4 percent of his passes and thrown five touchdown passes versus zero interceptions.  There’s a reason why Wilson’s “free-agent” acquisition this offseason was hailed in many corners as a potential title-winning move.  Those numbers added to that running game and defense are it.

— In Colorado’s 36-33 non-conference loss in overtime over conference foe Cal –don’t ask — quarterback Tyler Hansen threw for a school-record 474 yards, while wide receiver Paul Richardson set another school mark with 282 yards receiving.  All the prolific passing aside, the Buffs are 0-2.  An exciting winless team, but winless nonetheless under first-year head coach Jon Embree.

— Oregon quarterback Darron Thomas tied a school record with six touchdown passes, including five in the first half, in the No. 13 Ducks’ 69-20 rebound rout of Nevada.  Thomas also threw for nearly 300 yards (295) and rushed for 81 yards on just eight carries in the win.

— In Michigan’s 35-31 thriller over Notre Dame, quarterback Denard Robinson passed for 338 yards — on just 11 completions.

— Unbelievably, Notre Dame has committed five turnovers inside the opponent’s five-yard line in two games this season.  Again, five turnovers inside the other team’s five; that rarely happens in one season let alone a pair of games.  All told, the Irish have committed a combined nine turnovers in games 1 & 2.

– Under no significant pressure, and with absolutely perfect weather conditions, Oregon State’s Johnny Hekker punted a fully-inflated football minus-four yards in the first quarter of the Beavers’ loss to Wisconsin.

— Tight end B.J. Cunningham‘s first-quarter catches gave him 149 for his career, setting the all-time Michigan State record.  He finished the game five catches, giving him 153 for his career.

— Washington State quarterback Marshall Lobbestael threw for career highs of 361 yards and five touchdowns in Wazzu’s 59-7 win over UNLV. And, yes, I included this note just so I could type the name “Lobbestael”.

— I know this is non-Div. 1-A, but it’s worth noting: Jim Tressel‘s old stomping grounds, Youngstown State, scored 63 points — in the first half.  The Penguins went on to beat Valparaiso 77-13.

Texas brings back former ‘Horn to coach running backs

MORGANTOWN, WV - NOVEMBER 14:  D'Onta Foreman #33 of the Texas Longhorns rushes against Jarrod Harper #22 of the West Virginia Mountaineers in the second half during the game on November 14, 2015 at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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From 2001-05, Anthony Johnson played running back at Texas. And by that, we mean he mostly stood and watched as Cedric Benson and Jamaal Charles played running back for the Longhorns.

Now his job is to recruit and develop the next Cedric Benson and Jamaal Charles.

Johnson was announced as Texas’ new running backs coach on Saturday, making this his third stint with the burnt orange and white following a run a quality control assistant from 2007-09. Johnson replaces Tommie Robinson, who returned to a role with USC last month.

“Our entire staff thought that Anthony was a perfect fit to coach our running backs,” head coach Charlie Strong said in a statement. “He’s a tremendous young coach with great energy and enthusiasm. Anthony played high school ball in Texas, played and coached at Texas and really knows the pride and tradition of our place and our state well. He’s a guy that has played running back at a high level, who also has gained a great deal of experience coaching the position and just has so much passion for the game and drive as a coach. You could really see that during our visits, and I know Sterlin (Gilbert) and the offensive staff really hit it off with him, too. He’ll be a super addition to our staff, and we’re looking forward to getting him here.”

Johnson arrives from Toledo, where he was recently promoted to co-offensive coordinator. He served as the Rockets’ running backs coach for the previous two seasons, seasons in which the northeastern UT led the MAC in rushing. Kareem Hunt was the league’s leading per-game rusher in both seasons, averaging 163.1 yards in 2015 and 108.1 in ’14.

Prior to Toledo, Johnson spent four seasons as Sam Houston State’s running backs coach. His star pupil in Huntsville was running back Timothy Flanders, who earned three nods as an FCS All-American, was named as a finalist for the Walter Payton Award (FCS’s answer to the Heisman), and twice won the Southland Conference Player of the Year honor.

“I’ve obviously been watching the program from afar for years, and I have great admiration for Coach Strong,” Johnson said. “After spending some time in Austin with him and his staff recently, you can really feel the energy of what’s going on at Texas. Coach Strong is a great football coach and a man of integrity who has so much passion for the kids and the program. There’s just a special feeling around him and the program right now. I know there are big things in the future for Texas football, and I can’t wait to get down there and be a part of it.

“I spent a lot of time with Sterlin (Gilbert), Matt (Mattox) and Jeff (Traylor), and I feel like I really connected with them. They’re all tremendous football coaches with a great vision for what they want to accomplish. I love what they’re bringing offensively, and I’ve been fortunate enough to coach in a very similar style of offense for years. I’m really looking forward to getting in that room with all of the talented running backs at Texas and playing my role to help get the offense going.”

Texas ranked 17th nationally in rushing last season despite limping to a 5-7 record. The ‘Horns return leading rusher D'Onta Foreman (681 yards on 7.17 yards per carry, five touchdowns), a junior, sophomore Chris Warren (470 yards on 6.62 yards per carry, four touchdowns), sophomore Kirk Johnson (eight carries for 44 yards) and incoming freshman Kyle Porter.

 

PHOTO: Jim Harbaugh hanging with Kenny G and Larry the Cable Guy at Pebble Beach

during the college football game at Michigan Stadium on October 17, 2015 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
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Jim Harbaugh‘s life is more interesting than yours and mine. That point has been well established by now. At this point he’s just running up the score.

Michigan’s head coach took some time between Signing Day and the beginning of spring practices to participate in the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am festivities and sprinkled his always-entertaining Twitter feed with some star gazing.

So when Kenny G plays Michigan’s Signing Day event next year and Larry the Cable Guy does his routine during the Wolverines’ spring break tip to California, don’t say you weren’t warned.

“I actually am thinking about a few things. There are a few things percolating,” Harbaugh told USA Today before teeing off in the Million Dollar Hole-in-One for Charity challenge alongside the likes of Mark WahlbergClint EastwoodWayne Gretzky and Bill Murray — which he lost horribly. “But for the most part I forget about football when I’m out here. Too much too look at, too many shots to take.”

Brady Hoke addresses how defensive goals have changed in college football

New Oregon defensive coordinator Brady Hoke meets with members of the media at the Hatfield-Dowling Complex near Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Ore., Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Hoke is a former head coach at Michigan. (Andy Nelson/The Register-Guard via AP)
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Brady Hoke is looking forward to getting back in coaching this season as Oregon’s defensive coordinator. A year away from the game from the coaching point of view after being let go by Michigan, Hoke is taking on a big task with revamping Oregon’s defense. With the offenses Hoke will see in the Pac-12, he knows the defensive goals that have been regular staples for decades in the past will no longer be what he believes to be a realistic goal.

It used to be the goal was 13 points or less. That was the standard everybody had,” Hoke said this week as he met with the Oregon media for the first time since being hired. “The style of offenses have changed. You can also see defenses evolving for the style of offense. If you’re going to play Stanford, your team goals for that week may be a little different, defensively, because of the style of offense.

“When you’re going to play Arizona, your points per possession become more important than holding [Stanford running back and Heisman Trophy finalist] Christian McCaffrey under 100 yards rushing. You have to be realistic for your players.”

It seems as though Hoke is prepared to give in on a few defensive goals he has lived by for years in hopes of achieving a larger vision with Oregon’s defense. Considering how much Oregon’s defense needs to improve. The Ducks ranked 117th in total defense in 2015. The lowlight of the season had to be the Alamo Bowl meltdown that saw a 31-point lead against TCU end up with a loss to the Horned Frogs. The question is what will be the goal for the Oregon defense in 2016, and how realistic will it be?

“If you set unrealistic goals — we want challenging goals, but unrealistic goals, that’s not fair to those kids,” Hoke said.

Helmet sticker to CoachingSearch.com.

Colorado promotes Darian Hagan to RB coach, shuffles offensive coaching duties

Handlers lead Ralphie, the mascot of Colorado, around the field before Colorado hosts Southern California in an NCAA football game in Boulder, Colo., Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
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One of key members of Colorado’s 1990 national championship team is moving up on the coaching staff in Boulder. Darian Hagan, who played quarterback for the Buffs in 1990 and won three Big Eight titles when conferences actually had numbers reflective of the number of teams in their conference, has been promoted to the role of running backs coach. The school announced Hagan’s promotion among a couple of accompanying coaching staff changes on Saturday. Hagan had been serving as a director of player development.

For Hagan, this will be the second time he has held a role as an assistant coach on the Colorado sideline. He was an offensive assistant in 2005 under Gary Barnett and he was a holdover when Dan Hawkins was named head coach in 2006. Hagan moved to the role of director of player development in 2011 under Jon Embree and he continued in that role under  head coach Mike MacIntyre.

“Darian brings a lot of pride and passion to our football program with his history here, and also brings expertise to our running backs,” MacIntyre said. “In shifting our offensive staff assignments a little bit, he will give us another dimension in our running game and working with our running backs.

As Hagan gets moved into the coaching staff, MacIntyre adjusting the coaching responsibilities on the offensive side of the staff to make room. Klayton Adams, who was coaching the running backs and tight ends, will now coach the offensive line. Gary Bernardi will take on the coaching duties with the tight ends and fullbacks after coaching the offensive line last season.