Mike McQueary

McQueary testifies in trial of Penn State officials


Testifying at the trial of on-leave Penn State athletic director Tim Curley and another former high-ranking university official, Mike McQueary again reiterated that he saw Jerry Sandusky sexually molesting a boy he believed to be 10 to 12 years old in a shower of the football building in 2002.

Curley and retired vice president for finance and business Gary Schultz have been charged with perjury and failure to report in connection to the alleged molestation involving Sandusky.  McQueary, as part of over two hours on the witness stand, testified that he informed then-head coach Joe Paterno the day after the alleged molestation, who then took the information of the alleged molestation to Curley and Schultz and arranged a meeting to discuss the situation.

“I told them that I saw Jerry in the showers with a young boy and what I had seen was extremely sexual … and it was wrong,” McQueary testified when asked what he told Curley and Schultz.  “There’s no question in my mind that I conveyed to them I saw Jerry with a boy in the showers and that it was severe sexual acts.”

McQueary acknowledged that he “did not see insertion or penetration“, but maintained “it was very clear it looked like there was intercourse going on.”

Sandusky, who by then was retired but maintained a significant presence around the football program, was barred by the administration from bringing boys onto the campus, McQueary said he was told 4-5 days later.  No one, including McQueary, went to the police with the information.

“In my mind it was like speaking to a DA,” McQueary said in regards to the meeting that included Schultz, who was head of the university police force as part of his job description.

After speaking to his father the night of the shower incident, McQueary went to the home of Paterno the following morning to speak to the coach.  McQueary testified that he told Paterno what he saw in the shower of the Lasch football building was “extremely sexual in nature” and without a doubt made it clear to Paterno that what he had witnessed between Sandusky and the boy — both of whom were naked — was a sexual act.  “Out of respect” for the coach, McQueary testified, the words “sodomy” or “anal intercourse” were not used.

As for Paterno’s reaction, McQueary testified that the coach “was shocked and saddened, slumped back in his chair and said sorry you had to see that, it’s terrible.”  Paterno added that McQueary had “done the right thing” in coming to him with the information.

Another eyebrow-raising note that came out of McQueary’s testimony was his initial interaction with Paterno following the 2002 incident.  When McQueary first phoned Paterno and informed him there was something they needed to talk about, the coach’s response was that “I don’t have a job for you if that’s what it’s about, so don’t bother coming over if that’s what it’s about.”

Shortly thereafter, McQueary was promoted from grad assistant to administrative assistant with the football program before being named wide receivers coach in 2004.

Following his second meeting with Schultz, McQueary testified that he never again spoke to anybody at the university about the alleged molestation, although Paterno did ask him 2-3 months later if he was OK.  Based on the reactions of Schultz and Curley, McQueary testified, he thought his information was taken seriously and the two would “investigate closely and follow up with me.”

McQueary also testified that he never confronted Sandusky about what he’d allegedly witnessed, either in the locker room when he first saw the former coordinator in the shower with the young boy or in the years afterwards.

Steve Spurrier discusses retirement; Gamecocks name Shawn Elliott interim coach

Steve Spurrier

Odds are pretty good Steve Spurrier has coached his final game as the Head Ball Coach, but Spurrier let it be known he is not going to go away quite as easily as you might think. Spurrier addressed the media today as South Carolina made its transition between coaches official. Spurrier noted he is resigning as head coach, but he is not necessarily retiring. As previously reported, Shawn Elliott will take on the role as interim head coach of the Gamecocks effective immediately.

The first thing Spurrier wants to remind everybody is he is not retiring. This is simply a resignation from his current position. Spurrier left the door open to possible options down the road for him in his post-coaching career. The idea of Spurrier walking away from the football world never to be heard from again is a startling one, so it is good to know he is not going to let that happen.

“College football is a game of recruiting, as well know,” Spurrier said when assessing why it was right for him to leave his job now. “That’s another reason I need to move on. I don’t know if coaching is completely over or not. It is fun being on a team. I might be a consultant for someone. I doubt if I’ll be a head coach again, but who knows?”

Spurrier said he realized Sunday the time to walk away was now and explained he always knew he would need to step aside the moment he saw himself holding the program back. That echoes the sentiment he has shared over the years, especially when asked about coaches like Joe Paterno and Bobby Bowden as they each got up in the years. This season South Carolina is off to a 2-4 start, so the writing was on the wall for Spurrier, who also said it was in the best interests for all if an inevitable change was handled immediately.

“We’ve slipped. It’s my fault. I’m the head coach,” Spurrier said of South Carolina’s recent struggles.”We haven’t lost it. We’ve got a dang good team.”

“Our team is not in shambles despite what some might say,” Elliott said when he was given a chance to speak to the media. “We’re going to do everything we can to make the University of South Carolina proud of this football program.”

Elliott will now have the rest of the season to show what he can do as a head coach, and he knows this will be a bit of an open audition for the job as South Carolina starts searching for its next head coach.

Mark Dantonio quickly tosses aside South Carolina discussion

Mark Dantonio

Michigan State has become a national power under the coaching of Mark Dantonio. The grizzled and confident coach has put together a master plan in East Lansing and has taken the Spartans to the top of the Big Ten along the way, capturing a Big Ten title and victories in the Cotton Bowl and Rose Bowl as well as in-state dominance over the Michigan Wolverines. Danotnio is preparing his Spartans to take on the Wolverines this week, but with the new vacancy opening up at South Carolina following the sudden retirement of Steve Spurrier, Dantonio has already been presented with the question about his thoughts on coaching at South Carolina.

He did not seem all that interested in discussing the vacancy when meeting with Michigan State media this morning.

“Coach Spurrier’s had an outstanding career there, it’s alma mater, and we’re here to talk about Michigan,” Dantonio said when asked about it today. Video below from the Big Ten Network

Dantonio played defensive back for the Gamecocks in the mid 1970s, which helps make Dantonio an interesting name to mention in any coaching future discussion out of Columbia. While Dantonio may have played at South Carolina for Jim Carlen, Dantonio grew up in Ohio and has coached the bulk of his career within Ohio and the Big Ten. He is also one win away from picking up his 100th career coaching victory, 81 of which have come at Michigan State.