Oklahoma v Kansas State

Venables: Clemson ‘was the right thing to do’ for career


The rumors connecting Oklahoma defensive coordinator Brent Venables to Clemson over the past week finally resulted in confirmation from Venables himself last night that he would be the new DC for the Tigers.

Reasons behind the move speculated from one extreme to the other. Some believed Venables was insulted that he would have to share the DC spot again with Mike Stoops; others pointed toward increased financial compensation at Clemson. As it is most of the time, it was probably a combination of factors and really somewhere in the middle.

Speaking with KREF Sports Talk 1400, Venables said the process was “gut wrenching” and included “lots of sleepless nights.”

“It was a difficult decision,” Venables said. “I felt deep down this was the right thing for me to do at the right time in my life.

“It’s an incredibly exciting opportunity, but to look in the rear view mirror and leave behind the relationships… to the University of Oklahoma… it’s a sad day.”

But after 13 years of service to Bob Stoops, Venables made a decision for Venables. Can you really blame a guy for that? Despite the fact that Oklahoma “moved mountains” to try to keep him — Venables said OU was able to get close to what Clemson was offering in both dollars and years — the longtime DC took a step to what he felt gave him a better opportunity to eventually be a head coach.

Isn’t that the ultimate goal of just about any coach? Venables, remember, was connected to the Clemson head coaching job a few years ago before it went to Dabo Swinney.

Of course, the big question still revolved around the re-hiring of Mike Stoops. Venables downplayed any friction.

“I have a fabulous relationship with Mike Stoops and I thought together we are better,” Venables said. “I thought we could rekindle the old magic, if you will.”

True, spun or otherwise, Venables has said and done all the right things in the process. If you’re going to leave, go out as a positive memory in people’s minds.

“I’ve had the highest of highs here both professionally and personally, and the lowest of lows here professionally and personally,” Venables said emotionally. “Believe it or not, I still call [Oklahoma] home.”

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press
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One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”


Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”

Wisconsin announces 10-year agreement with Under Armour

Joel Stave
Associated Press

What has long been rumored became fact Friday, as Wisconsin announced a 10-year agreement with Under Armour.

“I am absolutely thrilled about our new partnership with Under Armour,” AD Barry Alvarez said in a statement. “Kevin Plank and his team have established a brand that fits perfectly with the Wisconsin athletics story and culture. Our primary focus at Wisconsin is, of course, our student-athletes, and Under Armour’s passion and commitment to high quality and innovation will benefit our student-athletes for years to come. Our entire department is looking forward to a long and mutually productive relationship with the Under Armour team.”

The new deal will pay the Badgers a total of $7 million in cash and product in 2015-16 and is valued at $96 million over the life of the contract, good for second in the Big Ten, trailing only Nike’s new contract with Michigan.

Hidden within the contract are two nuggets that UA offered to sway the Badgers away from Adidas, from the Portland Business Journal:

Wisconsin will get as much as $500,000 from Under Armour to “rebrand” athletic facilities. It’ll get $150,000 to build out an Under Armour retail space in a campus gift shop called Bucky’s Locker Room. It also gets two summer internships for students at Under Armour’s Baltimore headquarters.

“The University of Wisconsin is an institution built on the highest values of academic excellence, and we are extremely proud to be teaming up with one of the most vibrant, distinctive and successful athletic programs in the country to help elevate the performance of all Badgers with innovative footwear and apparel,” added Plank.

Wisconsin’s departure continues to weaken the stronghold Adidas had built in the Midwest after losing Michigan to Nike and Notre Dame to Under Armour in recent years (the company still owns apparel rights for Indiana and Nebraska). The Badgers are now the 41st Division I athletics department and 17th FBS program to join UA.