Updated: Sandusky labeled as ‘likely pedophile’ in report

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UPDATED 3/24 @ 11:30 a.m. ET: According to a Patriot-News report earlier this week, a child psychologist concluded that one of Jerry Sandusky’s alleged victims, “Victim 6”, was not sexually abused by Sandusky — a conclusion that could have significant legal ramifications in Sandusky’s case.

However, it appears the other child psychologist mentioned in the report has a different view, one that could also be equally important in Sandusky’s trial.

NBC News has obtained a complete internal Penn State file of the 1998 police investigation of Sandusky, which looks into allegations that the former PSU defensive coordinator showered and horsed around with two boys. State College, Pa., psychologist Dr. Alycia A. Chambers, the therapist for Victim 6, was included in that report. Below is a portion of her conclusion:

“My consultants agree that the incidents meet all of our definitions, based on experience and education, of a likely pedophile’s pattern of building trust and gradual introduction of physical touch, within a context of a ‘loving,’ ‘special’ relationship.

“One colleague, who has contact with the Second Mile, confirms that Mr. Sandusky is reasonably intelligent and thus, could hardly have failed to understand the way his behavior would be interpreted, if known. His position at the Second Mile and his interest in abused boys would suggest that he was likely to have had knowledge with regard to child abuse and might even recognize this behavior as a typical pedophile ‘overture.’” 

A report from the Patriot-News earlier this week noted that a second psychologist, John Seasock, was consulted after a first psychologist concluded Sandusky’s behavior was a “classic example of how a sexual abuser grooms his victim.” Seasock, however, drew his own conclusion that Victim 6 was not sexually abused by Sandusky, nor was there “grooming” or “inappropriate sexual behavior” by Sandusky. Seasock did admit, though, there were “gray areas” and that investigators “can’t walk away from the investigation.”

Seasock had previously worked with the local Centre County Child and Youth Services, a local agency that had licensed Sandusky as a foster parent. Seasock did not comment to NBC News for their story

When reached by NBC News, and with the permission of Victim 6’s family, Chambers reiterated “There was very little doubt in my mind (Sandusky) … was a male predator, someone that was in the process of grooming a young man for abuse. I thought…my report was strong enough to suggest that this was somebody who should be watched.”

The allegations involving Victim 6 are, for a lack of a better word, interesting. No where in the grand jury indictment does it state Victim 6 was sexually abused by Sandusky. At the same time, the allegations became grounds for an investigation that provided precedence for concern when the alleged 2002 incident between Sandusky and “Victim 2” took place four years later, even though the ’98 investigation was ultimately scrapped. Former PSU VP Gary Schultz testified that he never reviewed the details of the case.

There was another person who never saw the details of the Chambers’ report. NBC News explains:

But one of the investigators on the 1998 case, Jerry Lauro, then with the state Department of Public Welfare and now retired, told NBC News he was never shown a copy of Chambers’ report and was stunned to learn of its conclusions. 

“Wow!” he said when he was read Chambers’ conclusions by a NBC News correspondent. “This is the first I’ve heard of this. I had no idea . If I would have seen the report, I would certainly have done some things differently. Boy, this is a shock. “

Sandusky’s lawyer, Joe Amendola, also says he hasn’t seen the report, but plans to dispute it with other psychologists who will testify for the defense.

“I understand that there are some people who could look at this behavior and say it’s a pedophile problem,” Amendola said. “But there are others who will say, ‘This is somebody who loves kids and loves to be around them’ … It’s the old story, you get your expert and I’ll get my expert.”

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As we’ve stated numerous times before, the scandal involving former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky branches far beyond the walls of Penn State’s athletic facilities. Investigations at the local, state and federal level involving two grand jury reports and totaling 10 alleged victims have made the story bigger than most of us can probably imagine.

One branch of the Sandusky story is that of prosecutor Ray Gricar, who mysteriously disappeared in 2005 before being declared legally dead last summer*. According to Pennsylvania’s state attorney general’s office, Gricar made the decision not to prosecute Sandusky in 1998 after two kids reported that Sandusky washed them in a shower. The reason behind Gricar’s decision remains unknown and his laptop hard drive, which was found in the Susquehanna River in close proximity to his parked car, was too badly damaged by water to be read.

However, Patriot-News report provides some new context that may explain Gricar’s decision to close the case:

Information made public in a searing grand jury presentment showed that Sandusky allegedly admitted to touching the boy known as Victim 6 while they were both naked and saying, “I wish I were dead.

What wasn’t made public until now was that two days before Gricar closed the case, a psychologist concluded Victim 6 was not sexually abused by Sandusky. 

The psychologist — John Seasock — was identified in court documents by Sandusky’s attorney as he asked a judge to force prosecutors to hand over the document, along with juvenile records and current and past addresses and phone numbers of the alleged victims.

 A source who reviewed those documents told the Patriot-News that he believed Seasock’s report was the reason the investigation was closed. Whether it actually was or not isn’t known for sure, but another psychologist, called a day after “Victim 6” reported the alleged “awkward” shower incident with Sandusky, concluded “what the boy described… was a classic example of how a sexual abuser grooms his victim,” said the source, paraphrasing the psychologist’s report.

It’s important to note that Seasock’s conclusion is just that — a conclusion — and not a reflection of what actually happened one way or the other.

In fact, the testimony from “Victim 6” remains a point of debate. The mother of alleged victim, who reportedly heard directly from Sandusky that he felt what he did was “wrong”, says prosecutors didn’t initially want to include her son’s testimony in the grand jury indictment.

“At that time, the information that we had wasn’t sufficient enough to substantiate a case,” Children and Youth Services investigator Jerry Lauro said in November. “I don’t want [the mother] to think we didn’t believe their kid back then. We did, but we didn’t have enough.”

Sandusky has admitted to showering and ‘horsing around” with young boys, but denies any sexual abuse. His trial has been set for May 14, where he faces over 50 counts of child-sex abuse.

(*note: Gracar’s disappearance isn’t believed to be connected to Sandusky’s allegations)

Michigan RB declares Wolverines actually beat Ohio State last year

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No. 9 Ohio State heads to No. 24 Michigan on Saturday (noon ET, FOX) looking to protect its 5-game winning streak against That Team Up North. According to Michigan running back Karan Higdon, though, it’s Michigan that’s looking to protect its claim over the scoreboard.

Higdon surely remembers last year’s game well. He was there, after all, carrying three times for five yards. However, it was actually Ohio State who won the game, 30-27 in double overtime. The game was incredibly close, as the score indicates. Michigan would have won if not for a pair of Wilton Speight disasters at the goal line, the first an interception that Malik Hooker returned for a touchdown to give Ohio State a 7-3 lead and the second a goal line fumble that ruined Michigan’s chance to take a 17-7 lead.

As we know, Ohio State fought back to win by this much. How much? Jim Harbaugh shows us below.

Higdon figures to have a much greater impact on this year’s game. He’s the Wolverines leading rusher 874 yards and 10 touchdowns, and ran for 200 yards and two touchdowns on just 16 carries in Michigan’s most recent home game, a 33-10 win over Minnesota.

Here’s hoping, for his sake, that he can have an impact on an actual Michigan victory this time around.

Finalists announced for a number of individual awards

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The final week of the regular season is upon us. Heck, some teams still have two games to play between now and bowl season. Still, it’s awards season in college football, and the petty matter of actual games won’t get in the way of the pageantry.

Let’s dive right in.

Bednarik Award (best defensive player)
Bradley Chubb, NC State
Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama
Roquan Smith, Georgia

Biletnikoff Award (best wide receiver)
Michael Gallup, Colorado State
David Sills V, West Virginia
James Washington, Oklahoma State

Bronko Nagurski Trophy (best defensive player)
Bradley Chubb, NC State
Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama
Josey Jewell, Iowa
Ed Oliver, Houston
Roquan Smith, Georgia

Butkus Award (best linebacker)
Devin Bush, Michigan
Tremaine Edmunds, Virginia Tech
T.J. Edwards, Wisconsin
Dorian O’Daniel, Clemson
Roquan Smith, Georgia

Davey O’Brien Award (best quarterback)
J.T. Barrett, Ohio State
Baker Mayfield, Oklahoma
Mason Rudolph, Oklahoma State

Doak Walker Award (best running back)
Saquon Barkley, Penn State
Bryce Love, Stanford
Jonathan Taylor, Wisconsin

Jim Thorpe Award (best defensive back)
DeShon Elliott, Texas
Minkah Fitzpatrick, Alabama
Josh Jackson, Iowa

John Mackey Award (best tight end)
Mark Andrews, Oklahoma
Troy Fumagalli, Wisconsin
Mike Geisicki, Penn State

Lou Groza Award (best kicker)
Daniel Carlson, Auburn
Dominik Eberle, Utah State
Matt Gay, Utah

Maxwell Award (best overall player)
Saquon Barkley, Penn State
Bryce Love, Stanford
Baker Mayfield, Oklahoma

Outland Trophy (best interior player)
Orlando Brown, Oklahoma
Quenton Nelson, Notre Dame
Ed Oliver, Houston

Ray Guy Award (best punter)
Michael Dickson, Texas
J.K. Scott, Alabama
Mitch Wishnowsky, Utah

Wuerffel Trophy (best community servant)
Blaise Taylor, Arkansas State
Courtney Love, Kentucky
Drue Tranquill, Notre Dame

Winners will be announced at the Home Depot College Football Awards show in Atlanta, Thursday, Dec. 7 on ESPN.

Kentucky loses TE C.J. Conrad to foot injury

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Kentucky tight end C.J. Conrad has been lost for the season to a lisfranc injury in his left foot, head coach Mark Stoops announced Monday. He will undergo surgery to correct the issue on Tuesday.

Though he caught just 16 passes for 286 yards and four touchdowns on the season, Conrad was Kentucky’s leading receiver this season. The junior caught one 17-yard pass in Big Blue’s 41-38 defeat of Louisville last season.

With Conrad, a junior, out, Kentucky will turn to senior Greg Hart and/or sophomore Justin Rigg at tight end, though the Louisville Courier-Journal notes that both have battled injuries of late.

Kentucky will close the season against Louisville in Lexington on Saturday (noon ET, SEC Network) and in a to-be-determined bowl game.

Joey Jones steps down as South Alabama head coach

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There’s never a good time to lose a football game 52-0, but even by that scale it’s an especially bad thing to lose 52-0 in a game you had to win to keep your bowl hopes alive to a team so disgusted by its own season that it fired its head coach a month ago.

That’s what South Alabama did on Saturday in dropping a 52-0 decision to Georgia Southern, giving the Eagles their first win of the season.

And on Monday, South Alabama announced head coach Joey Jones will resign following the Jaguars’ Dec. 2 finale at New Mexico State.

“There comes a time in every program where there is a need for change.  For this program that I love so much, that time is now,” Jones said in a statement.  “One of the proudest days of my professional life was being the named the first head coach at South Alabama.  Today is difficult, but it is the right step for me, my family and for this football program.”

Jones is the only head coach South Alabama has ever known, hired Feb. 15, 2008. He led the Jags for three seasons as an FCS Independent before joining the Sun Belt in 2012, taking the club to bowl games in 2014 and 2016.

The loss Saturday dropped the program to 4-7 this season, ending hopes of returning to a bowl game for the first time in the program’s short history.

“Joey Jones is the father of our football program.  He, his wife Elise and his entire family put their arms around the program and committed to its establishment and growth,” said AD Dr. Joel Erdmann.  “He has placed South Alabama Football on strong footing, which is something he and his family can be very proud of and we sincerely appreciate.  His good, hard work and commitment will forever be recognized.”