Alabama Crimson Tide's Richardson holds up the trophy with teammate Kirkpatrick after they defeated the LSU Tigers during the NCAA BCS National Championship college football game in New Orleans

‘Costas Tonight’ dives into the dysfunction of college athletics

6 Comments

As we mentioned in a primer a couple of days ago, “Costas Tonight: Live from 30 Rock” held a town hall/round table style special on the pressing issues of college athletics.

To reiterate the words of Bob Costas, not every angle was covered and not every voice was heard, but a few issues were brought up. Here were the highlights:

Pay for play
By now, you probably know the story. The NCAA originally passed legislation last fall to allow schools and conferences to add up to an additional $2,000 to the value of an athletic scholarship to their athletes. That proposal was met with enough opposition by Division 1 members to suspend it until what is now being reported to be an August revisit.

The issue itself is worthy of an extended deadline. Do schools allow college athletes to be paid their free market value, as ex-agent Josh Luchs suggested in a Sports Illustrated column?* Should there be a compromise and recognition that participating in college athletics is a full-time job that has a zero dollar cap? Or, is the value of an education, books, food, housing, etc enough?

(*that’s never going to happen; I’m just laying out ideas)

Joe Nocera of the New York Times related college athletics to “unpaid labor” and outlined a plan to where programs allowed a multi-million salary cap for teams where a minimum salary of $25,000 was given and select players could get more.

Agent Drew Rosenhaus said “athletes deserve more than what they’re getting. What they get is not equal to what they’re giving up.”

CFT’s take: Let’s be honest about paying players. What does it mean and are we okay with the consequences? The truth of the matter is that universities provide ample resources for their athletes, from the educational, to the financial for, say, an emergency trip home. The life of a college athlete isn’t exactly that of the starving student it’s sometimes made out to be.

With that said, playing sports is a full-time job for these athletes. Not a part-time job, a full-time job. And it’s one that offers limited, although not nonexistent, opportunities for compensation elsewhere during the academic year. The question we need to ask is what’s the dollar amount associated with the time that is being put toward the sport vs. what the athletes need. Minimum wage? Skilled labor? That’s what athletes should be compensated.

It’s about finding a middle ground.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

The BCS vs. playoff debate
BCS executive director Bill Hancock said during tonight’s broadcast, as he has said time and time again, that major college football’s regular season is the playoff.

It isn’t, and Hancock knows it. Costas promptly called Hancock on his bogus spin, pointing to teams like Boise State and TCU, which had undefeated seasons in years past and yet no shot at a BCS title. Hancock was speechless. As in, he had no response.

How can I describe it? In the movie “The Royal Tenembaums”, Ben Stiller‘s character accused Gene Hackman of stealing savings bonds out of an account. All Hackman’s character could do was chuckle helplessly and awkwardly in response.

It was like that.

But BCS leaders, to their credit, have listened to enough backlash to understand something needed to be done. So they met. And met again. And will continue to meet until July. And today, we found out that postseason ideas have basically been grouped into four categories, one of which reeks so profoundly of BCS slime that I’m not convinced Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany wasn’t just screwing with our heads out of boredom.

CFT’s take: There’s not much that hasn’t already been said. Anything — well, except for the now-infamous Rose Bowl idea — would be almost an immediate improvement over the current system, no matter how small or displaced. To me, there are four individuals who are running away with the oversight in college football. You can probably guess who they are, but just in case, here’s a hint: they run the Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC. If/when they decide outsourcing their postseason to third parties is tiring, they’ll adapt. And so will the rest of college football.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

Conference realignment
This has been downright frustrating. Driving the scenarios where San Diego State plays in the Big East, Missouri is in the same division as Florida and two conferences fold into one to form a 24-team hodgepodge has been the pursuit of the ever-lucrative TV dollar.

After two years of shifting, moving and near-superconferences, South Florida athletic director Doug Woolard was asked tonight if the realignment craze had gone too far.

The answer, of course, is an emphatic yes, but you can click the video below to see a longer answer. If nothing else, it’s interesting to get the perspective of an AD whose own conference was nearly annihilated by realignment… and then nearly annihilated another conference in the process.

CFT’s take: Realignment is a bittersweet game for us. On one hand, we’re never opposed to the benefit it brings our site, but I’ll be damned if it didn’t make the 2011 season a lot less enjoyable on the field. The worst part is the feeling of helplessness that comes with it. Tradition? Whatever, big deal. Contractual agreements? Nothing more than the paper used to light celebratory cigars following the addition of a new school to a new conference. How can you or I — the common folk — argue with the almighty dollar, no matter how weak it is compared to the Euro?

The short answer is we can’t.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

Other items from the docket tonight that didn’t necessarily involve football:

— ESPN analyst Jay Bilas, new South Carolina coach Frank Martin and former Boston College quarterback Doug Flutie shared their thoughts about the one-and-done rule in college basketball. Bilas, as you might imagine, had zero issue with it, Martin wanted it taken out entirely and Flutie did his best to support staying in school. Martin suggested going back to the rule where freshman must sit out a year before playing varsity sports.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

— Former Mizzou receiver Sean Coffey was part of a panel discussing academics. Coffey said he felt sports operate essentially as a full-time job for athletes, and agreed with Costas’ assertion that academic advisers work to help athletes stay eligible, not enhance the educational experience. I think it’s fair, though, to point out that college will always be what the athlete — or you, your son or daughter  — makes of it.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

— NCAA president Mark Emmert sat down with Costas for a one-on-one interview. In between a handful of “I agrees” and “you’re rights”, Emmert acknowledged it was time to cut down on “trivial” violations and increase severity of sanctions for major infractions. That’s been the goal for the past year, but nothing definitive has been done yet because, well, it’s not as simple as ripping out the pages of the NCAA’s rulebook.

This video is no longer available. Click here to watch more NBC Sports videos!

Turner Smiley, UNT’s leading returning WR, arrested for DWI

UNT helmet
North Texas athletics
Leave a comment

For the third consecutive day, it’s time to hit the reset button on the “Days Without An Arrest” ticker.

The latest to trigger a move back to double zeroes is North Texas’ Turner Smiley, with the Denton Police Department’s website showing that the wide receiver has been charged with driving while intoxicated.  The arrest took place shortly before 4 a.m. CST Wednesday.

No details of what led up to the arrest and charge are available.

Screen Shot 2016-07-27 at 10.37.54 AM

A UNT spokesman first confirmed that the football program is aware of the development, and later a statement attributed to head coach Seth Littrell was released.

We are aware of the situation regarding Turner Smiley from earlier this morning and we are still in the process of collecting all the facts.  Until I have an opportunity to talk with him I will refrain from further comment.  We have high expectations for all of our student-athletes and we take situations like this very seriously.  We will take an immediate and appropriate course of action after I speak with him.

Last season, Smiley was third on the team in receptions (25) and receiving yards (255).  He’s the leading returning receiver on the Mean Green, and the only player on the roster with more than 17 receptions last season.

Iowa State TE survives being hit by car, albeit with 103 stitches

Iowa State helmet
Leave a comment

The college football world was rocked by tragedy over the weekend, and it appears another football program narrowly averted its own heartbreak as well.

Thursday evening, the Springfield News-Leader reports, Chase Allen was hit by a vehicle outside of the Iowa State practice facility.  Allen managed to jump just prior to impact, although he landed on the car’s windshield, shattering it.

From the News-Leader:

Allen said he had a large amount of broken glass in his back, but managed to avoid hitting his head or suffering any bone injuries.

Allen popped up and was taken to an emergency room by some of his Iowa State coaches.

Allen took 103 stitches on his back after being cut by shattered windshield glass.

“The coaches were there with me in the E.R., and I’ll be cleared when the stitches heal up. (It) could have been so much worse,” Allen said.

According to an ISU official, the tight end should be at least cleared in part for the start of summer camp early next month.  It’s likely Allen will be held out of full contact, at least for the early portion of camp.

Allen came to Ames this summer after signing with the Cyclones this past February as a three-star recruit.  He was rated as the No. 6 player at any position in the state of Missouri and the No. 26 tight end in the country.  In 247Sports.com rankings, only one 2016 signee ranked higher than Allen — offensive tackle Sean Foster.

Cal to give away bobblehead of Marshawn Lynch celebrating on injury cart

BERKELEY, CA - OCTOBER 21: Marshawn Lynch #10 of the California Golden Bears celebrates by driving a golf cart on the field after an interception by Desomond Bishop secured the 31-24 victory in overtime against the Washington Huskies on October 21, 2006 at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, California.  (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

This is real, and it’s spectacular.

In 2006, Marshawn Lynch continued creating the legend that would ultimately morph into “Beast Mode” when, following an overtime win over Washington in which his 22-yard touchdown run proved to be the game-winner, the then-Cal running back decided the best way to commemorate the victory was by commandeering an injury cart and driving it around the Memorial Stadium turf.  Lynch’s “Ghost Ride the Whip” became legendary in the Bay Area…

… and now it’s being commemorated by the Golden Bears in bobblehead form:

That bobblehead will be handed out at the Nov. 5 game against Washington as Cal celebrates the 10th anniversary of the win. And, suffice to say, I want one. Badly.

Car accident will likely sideline Texas RB Roderick Bernard for all of 2016

AUSTIN, TX - SEPTEMBER 5:  A fan waves a large Lonhorns flag during the game between the Louisiana Monroe Warhawks and the Texas Longhorns on September 5, 2009 at Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium in Austin, Texas. The Longhorns defeated the Warhawks 59-20. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Car accidents have been a sad theme in college football this past week, and, unfortunately, it has continued.  Fortunately, though, this latest one didn’t involve a fatality.

According to a tweet from Brian Davis of the Austin American-Statesman, the high school coach of Texas’ Roderick Bernard confirmed that his former player was injured in a car accident earlier this month.  As a result, the coach expects Bernard to miss the entire 2016 season.

There were no details as to the nature of the injuries sustained by Bernard, nor has UT addressed the player’s status moving forward.

As a true freshman in 2014, Bernard served as the Longhorns’ primary kick returner before sustaining a knee injury (torn ACL)) in the fifth game that ended his season prematurely. He returned for the 2015 season after missing spring practice rehabbing the knee and played in 10 games, primarily on special teams.

This past spring, hBernard, a three-star 2014 signee, moved from wide receiver to running back.