SEC, Big Ten pace NFL draft selections

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After the first three rounds of the NFL draft was tucked neatly into bed late last week, the SEC held a narrow lead over the Big Ten and Pac-12 in the number of players selected the first two days.

While one of those conferences hung in there through the last four rounds, it was still the six-time defending national champs standing atop the draft mountaintop at the end of business Saturday.

Of the 253 players selected in the seven-round event, 42 were players from an SEC school.  This marks the 13th time in the last 15 seasons — including the last six in a row — that the SEC has led or tied for the most players taken in a single draft.

Nipping on the SEC’s heels, however, was the Big Ten, which saw 41 players from its conference selected.  The only other conference with more than 30 players was the ACC (31).  The Big Ten and ACC were second and third last April as well.

Since 1990, a total of 862 SEC players have been selected, far outdistancing the Big Ten and its 747 players.

Below is the conference-by-conference breakdown of players taken in the 2010 NFL draft:

SEC — 42
Big Ten — 41
ACC — 31
Pac-12 — 28
Big 12 — 25
Non-FBS — 24
MWC — 12
Big East — 12
WAC — 11
C-USA — 10
MAC — 8
Sun Belt — 6
Ind. — 4

Here are a couple of conference notes from the draft as well:

— The SEC had the most players selected in the first (nine), fourth (10) and fifth rounds (tied with six), while the Big Ten led in the second (seven), fifth (tied with six), sixth (seven) and seventh rounds (nine).  The only other conference to “lead” a round was the ACC with six selections in the third round.

— The only players from independent schools to be drafted came from Notre Dame, with four Irish players hearing their names called in the seven rounds of the draft.

— Of the 11 players from the WAC who were taken, six came from schools that are joining the Mountain West in 2012 — Nevada (four), Fresno State (one) and Hawaii (one).

As far as individual schools go, Alabama had four players taken in Thursday’s first round and finished with eight overall, the most for any one team.  Another member of the SEC, Georgia, had seven players drafted, as did Oklahoma.  Boise State, Cal, Iowa, Miami (Fla.), Michigan State South Carolina and Wisconsin all had six each, while five players each came from Baylor, LSU and North Carolina State.

Arkansas, Cincinnati, Clemson, Florida State, Illinois, Nebraska, Nevada, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Oregon, Penn State, San Diego State, SMU, Stanford, Texas A&M and Wake Forest all had four players apiece selected.

At least one player from Wisconsin was taken in each of the first six rounds, while just one non-FBS school — Montana, two — had more than one player taken in the draft.

The SEC was the only conference in which each member of its league had at least one player selected, but just barely; Auburn, Ole Miss and Tennessee had just one player each selected, none before the fourth round.  And, for those Vols fans keeping score at home, in-state rival Vanderbilt doubled up UT with two players taken.

On the flip side, a total of 40 FBS schools did not have a single player drafted in any of the seven rounds, including 10 from the “Big Six” conferences.

Two teams each from the ACC (Duke, Maryland), Big East (Pittsburgh, USF), Big Ten (Indiana, Minnesota), Big 12 (Kansas, Texas Tech) and Pac-12 (UCLA, Washington State) were all shutout over the course of the draft.  The combined record for those teams in 2011?  Two bowl bids and a 37-86 mark, which could very well explain the lack of interest on the part of the NFL.

No. 13 Notre Dame rolling early to take big halftime lead over turnover-prone USC

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There are bad starts, and there are starts like what No. 11 USC had in the first half of their rivalry game against No. 13 Notre Dame.

Fumble on the first drive? Check. Shank a short field goal? Yep. Muff a punt? Indeed. Throw an interception. Thumbs up.

As a result, the Irish fed off an electric atmosphere in South Bend to jump out to a hot start against their intersectional rival and went to the locker room up 28-0 at halftime in a game that seems over given the way the two sides are playing at the moment.

Proving that a few weeks off were indeed plenty to get back to 100 percent, quarterback Brandon Wimbush looked sharp in taking advantage of all those USC miscues. He finished the half with two touchdown passes (one to Kevin Stepherson, the other to Equanimeous St. Brown) and ran for 76 yards and another score despite that balky foot injury that kept him out for several weeks.

Running back Josh Adams didn’t get a ton of work given all the quick end zone trips (just 14 carries), but also gave a boost to his low-key Heisman campaign by running for 68 yards and a touchdown.

As many positives as you could come up with for Notre Dame in the half, you could just about double it and come up with the number of negatives for USC. Sam Darnold had one of his worst halves in cardinal and gold, fumbling on the opening drive and throwing an interception late in the second quarter. He wound up with 107 yards as the only source of offense for the Trojans after Ronald Jones was bottled up to the tune of just five yards on seven carries.

USC has authored several second half comebacks already this year but, based on the way they played so far in Notre Dame Stadium, they’re going to need a comeback just to avoid getting blown out. The flip side is another strong showing like that and all the College Football Playoff talk surrounding the Irish will start to become very, very real come Sunday.

Penn State starts fast, but Michigan hanging around

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On a white out night in State College, Penn State threatened to blowout Michigan early, but the Wolverines battled back to a 21-13 deficit at the break.

Penn State offensive coordinator Joe Moorhead pulled out a wrinkle on the Nittany Lions’ second play from scrimmage, and it worked to perfection. Quarterback Trace McSorley and running back Saquon Barkley shifted pre-snap, and Barkley took the direct snap and raced 69 yards untouched for a touchdown.

After forcing a three-and-out, Penn State moved 78 yards in four plays, keyed by a 35-yard rainbow heave from McSorley to tight end Mike Gesicki. Barkley scored his second touchdown of the first quarter one play later, a 15-yard burst around the right side. 

But Penn State’s offense stalled from there. The Lions’ next possession ended in a McSorley interception, and the possession after that was a three-and-out that lost nine yards. Penn State penetrated Michigan territory midway through the second quarter, but Barkley dropped a wheel route that would’ve put the Lions inside the red zone. Penn State turned the ball over on downs two plays later.

Meanwhile, Michigan turned McSorley’s interception into an 11-play, 59-yard touchdown drive capped by a 1-yard Karan Higdon run on fourth-and-goal. Quinn Nordin missed the ensuing PAT.

After the turnover on downs, Michigan marched 67 yards on a series of John O’Korn plays — a 14-yard rush, an 18-yard strike to Donovan Peoples-Jones, and 23 yards to Kekoa CrawfordTy Isaac powered in from six yards out to pull the Wolverines within one with 1:45 to play before the half. 

Threatened for the first time of the evening, Penn State ended its streak of three straight unsuccessful drives with a 7-play, 75-yard march that consumed only 52 seconds. McSorley accounted for 68 yards on the drive, including a 3-yard rush to put the home team back up eight.

O’Korn closed the half hitting 7-of-9 passes for 63 yards, while a host of Wolverines runners combined to rush 22 times for 78 yards.

McSorley hit 10-of-18 passes for 159 yards with an interception with five carries for 26 yards and a score. Barkley rushed 11 times for 109 yards and two scores, while DaeSean Hamilton caught three passes for 69 yards.

Michigan will receive to open the second half.

Tennessee’s Rashaan Gaulden apologizes for flipping off Alabama fans

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It would take someone in need of Mr. Magoo-level corrective lenses to not see this one coming.

As you no doubt know by now, Alabama took Tennessee to the woodshed Saturday afternoon in Tuscaloosa.  The Vols did save a slight sliver of their collective manhood as they scored a touchdown for the first time since the second quarter of the Sept. 23 win over previously winless UMass, a span that stretched nearly 13 full quarters of playing time.

In the aftermath of that defensive touchdown, however, defensive back Rashaan Gaulden decided to offer up a double-digit, middle-finger salute to the Crimson Tide student section that resulted in a 15-yard penalty.  In the aftermath of that gesture, Gaulden offered up an apology.

“I would like to issue an apology to the University of Tennessee and the University of Alabama for my gesture after the pick-six by (Daniel) Bituli,” Gaulden said. “That remark that I showed was very out of character. That’s not how my parents raised me. That’s not how a leader of the team should show their emotions on the field.

“I really, sincerely apologize to the student section at Alabama for disrespecting them.”

Beleaguered head coach Butch Jones, who is likely out at some point after the end of the regular season if not sooner, certainly didn’t need something like this shedding even more negative light on his flailing football program.  Jones stated that any punishment meted out to Gaulden will be handled internally.

“That’s something that will be dealt with internally in our football program, but that’s not who we are, that’s not what we’re about,” Jones said. “But, he knew that. We spoke about it, and he feels awful about it. It’s one of those things of overall just being a mature football team. But, again, that’s something that we don’t accept in this program and he understands that.”

Since we here, we’ll go ahead and offer this up as the current state of the once-proud UT football program.

Late heroics save No. 9 Oklahoma on the road at Kansas State after wild second half

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Just before the end of the first half, everybody was wondering if Baker Mayfield was 100 percent healthy. Just before the end of the second half, it became pretty clear he was doing just fine. The Sooners’ star quarterback was dazzling once again to power a last minute comeback on the road, leading No. 9 Oklahoma to a 42-35 win against a pesky Kansas State squad that was looking to pull an upset before some late heroics on the final drive.

The signal-caller appeared to get injured during a scramble late in the second quarter and was taken out in the red zone on the ensuing possession, used only as a decoy on a few wildcat snaps. As it turned out, that seemed to be a coaching strategy as OU rotated in backup Kyler Murray several times on ensuing possessions. Mayfield eventually wound up with an efficient 32-of-41 for 410 yards and two touchdowns passing while rushing for two scores and 69 yards as well.

Most importantly, he also got the win after perfectly executing a two minute drive that led to tailback Rodney Anderson (147 yards, two scores) hitting the corner for the game-winning touchdown.

That was all despite the best efforts of his counterpart Alex Delton, who was making just his second start behind center for the Wildcats. While he was solid as a passer (144 yards, one TD, one interception), the dual-threat was incredible on the ground and ran for 161 yards and three touchdowns. That led to quite the combination in the backfield as Alex Barnes managed 108 yards — 75 of which came on a touchdown run on the second snap of the game.

The close victory on the road keeps Oklahoma in the College Football Playoff race, even if the effort was less than impressive given the early struggles. The meeting between the youngest and oldest coaches in FBS proved to be quite the thriller in the end too, as Lincoln Riley claimed the ‘W’ over the Wizard himself Bill Snyder in what will surely be a memorable game for both sides.