Urban Meyer

Playoff issue divisive, but now there’s compromise


When it comes to a college football playoff, there is one known truth: it’s being recommended, and barring a complete and sudden veto during conference spring meetings, four teams will compete for a BCS championship in 2014.

Beyond that, your guess is as good as mine when it comes to how the whole thing will look. Bowl sites or on-campus? Selection committee or formula? Chicken or fish?

As a (sort of) member of the media, I can assure you the accommodation factor is (not) a hot button issue. Where I (won’t) sit inside Kansas State’s press box, or which Manhattan Motel 6 I (won’t) stay in — I don’t even want to fathom an hour wait at the local Applebee’s — are logistics to be settled on another day and, frankly, ones that I couldn’t give two squats about.

For now, there are bigger questions from some as to whether a four-team playoff is even in the best interest of the sport. Thanks to Josh Kendall at The State (SC), a pair of outspoken coaches, both with Florida ties, have given their opinion on the matter.

Ohio State Urban Meyer says he’s on the fence. “Can they really play 15 games?” Meyer pondered. “Where is this headed? I’m a traditionalist.”

South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier, on the other hand, knows exactly where it’s headed. Spurrier said he’s a fan of the playoff idea “and I (will) like the eight team when we go to that in about five years.”

But whether it’s five years or 10, the HBC is saying what surely many others are thinking. As John opined last week, a four-team playoff isn’t perfect, but it’s a start. And whether anyone out there reading this is for or against a playoff of any kind, you have to believe that a four-team playoff is the gateway to a larger pool of teams competing for a championship down the road.

Why? A four-team playoff has its own set of imperfections and the decision makers aren’t going into this blind to them. Granted, those imperfections are spilled milk compared to the current system, but imperfections nonetheless.

College football is accepting an alternative, knowing it doesn’t have to be the long-term answer. Fascinating, isn’t it?

Look, I’m as big a playoff advocate as anyone (although I didn’t use to be), but a four-team playoff will only modestly temper the annual complaining and howling about selection… revenue distribution… you name it. We’re talking about uncharted territory here.

Take the revenue, for example. The numbers vary, but it’s believed a playoff could exponentially increase the amount of money poured into the sport. Who will benefit from that extra money? It should be the athletes across all sports, who work tirelessly for their coaches and their school. Will they, though?

That’s the question.

Eventually, the answer, along with others, will come from another event (see 2012 BCS championship). And another set of meetings. And another set of change.

It’s evolution.

It’s just a matter of whether the likes of Jim Delany and Bill Hancock will be part of the evolution when it happens.

Dalvin Cook remains day-to-day for FSU vs. Miami

Dalvin Cook
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One of the more underrated storylines heading into Week 6 continued its tack of uncertainty Tuesday.

During the first quarter of Florida State’s win over Wake Forest this past Saturday, Dalvin Cook tweaked his hamstring and didn’t return to the contest.  The sophomore running back was initially labeled as day-to-day for this weekend’s game against Miami, and that hasn’t changed as Jimbo Fisher reaffirmed that Cook’s status for the in-state rivalry game remains up in the air.

We’ll keep waiting,” the head coach said, adding that, because of Cook’s knowledge of the offense, he could sit out of practice the entire week and still take the field against the Hurricanes.

“He knows what to do, you can keep him healthy and do that there’s no doubt about that,” Fisher said.

Cook is far and away FSU’s leading rusher, with his 142.5 yards per game good for eight in the country and his six rushing touchdowns tied for 20th. The Seminoles’ No. 2 rusher, Mario Pender, is still dealing with the aftereffects of a collapsed lung that will sideline him for at least another week.

Ryan Simmons, one of Okla. St.’s ‘unquestioned leaders,’ out for rest of 2015

AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 16:  Ryan Simmons #52 of the Oklahoma State Cowboys brings down Jaxon Shipley #8 of the Texas Longhorns during a game at Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium on November 16, 2013 in Austin, Texas.  Oklahoma State won the game 38-13.  (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
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Oklahoma State’s defense has taken what will likely prove to be a very significant and impactful blow.

On Twitter as well as Instagram late Tuesday night, Ryan Simmons announced that he “recently tore my MCL & PCL which will require surgery.” As a result, Simmons, who was injured in the Week 5 win over Kansas State, will miss the remainder of the 2015 season, even as OSU has yet to officially confirm the linebacker’s status moving forward.

Because Simmons is a senior, and this is his final season of eligibility, the end of his 2015 season would also mean the end of his collegiate career.

Simmons has started the last 31 games for the Cowboys. He was second on the team in tackles last season, and his 26 career tackles for loss makes him OSU’s active leader in that category as well.

On his official bio, it’s written that Simmons is “[o]ne of the unquestioned leaders of the team, both on and off the field.”