John Marinatto

Big East confirms Marinatto’s ‘resignation’ as commish

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UPDATED 10:19 a.m. ET: In a press release, John Marinatto confirmed that he has “resigned” his position as the conference’s commissioner.

“After a great deal of thought and prayer, I have decided to step down as Commissioner of the Big East conference and formally advised our Board of Directors,” said Marinatto in a statement.  “I have been associated with this league for my entire adult life and have had the tremendous honor of serving as its Commissioner since 2009.   Our recent expansion efforts have stabilized the Conference for the long term, and we are likewise well positioned for our very important upcoming television negotiations.  As a result, I felt this was the right time to step aside and to let someone else lead us through the next chapter of our evolution.

“I am proud of what we have been able to accomplish and would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank both our membership and my staff for their unwavering encouragement, support and loyalty — especially during this past year.  I am extremely confident about the future of this league that I love very much.”

Marinatto took over as the Big East’s commissioner july 1, 2009, replacing Mike Tranghese.

“I know I speak for the entire Conference when I express my sincere gratitude to John for his leadership and dedicated years of service,” said Dr. Judy Genshaft, USF president and Chair of the Big East conference.  “John helped build the BIG EAST into what it is today, and played a critical role in our successful expansion efforts, and for all of that we thank him.”

Joseph A. Bailey III, former CEO of the Miami Dolphins, will replace Marinatto on an interim basis.

“The Big East has a terrific future,” said Bailey. “I’m excited to participate in shaping a new structure and strategic plans for the Conference, and I look forward to engaging on these matters with the leadership of all of the Conference’s members, old and new alike.”

In the release, the Big East also offered a rough outline as to how a successor for Marinatto will be selected:

The Conference also announced that it has retained The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) to review its organizational design and structure.  As the BIG EAST transitions to a national conference, its members will take this opportunity to position the Conference to maximize its media rights, branding and other strategies.

The search for the new Commissioner of the BIG EAST will be chaired Dr. Gregory H. Williams, the President of the University of Cincinnati and a member of the BIG EAST Executive Committee.

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Well, this is certainly an unexpected development.  Then again, given the number of big-name defections that have hit the Big East the past couple of years, not really.

According to Brett McMurphy of CBSSports.com, John Marinatto tendered his resignation as the conference’s commissioner Monday morning.  July 1 would’ve been the third anniversary of Marinatto’s hiring as the third commissioner in the history of the conference.

No reason was given for Marinatto’s decision, or if the decision was a “forced resignation” ahead of landing a new television deal as some already suspect.  A conference official told CFT via email that “a statement addressing Marinatto’s status will be released later today.”

Under Marinatto’s leadership, the Big East has lost West Virginia (to the Big 12 in 2012), Pittsburgh and Syracuse (to the ACC in 2013) during the last big round of conference expansion last year.  While the Big East subsequently added Boise State, Houston, Memphis, San Diego State and SMU for next season as well as Temple this year, Marinatto has received a heavy amount of criticism for his perceived inability to stave off bigger leagues from plucking key members from the conference.

As noted by Mark Ennis of the Big East Coast Bias blog, this is a particularly bad time for the Big East to be searching for a commissioner, given the fact that a new playoff format is currently being debated and is expected to be finalized sometime in July.

Suffice to say, we’ll have more on this story as the situation develops.

VIDEO: OK State QB Mason Rudolph completes pass to receiver on jet ski

Mason Rudolph jet ski pass
Mason Rudolph/Oklahoma State
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Who doesn’t love a good offseason trick shot video? College football has no shortage of such viral videos, including this one of Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph tossing a pass to a target cruising by on a jet ski.

More precisely, Rudolph tosses a short pass to a receiver bouncing off a diving board, who then tosses back to Rudolph, who then goes deep to a receiver going by on a jet ski.

That is one way to show off what you can do with the pigskin in the offseason. The quick little pass to the diving board target is nothing too fancy, and Rudolph passing to someone on a jet ski is not all that much different for the Cowboys quarterback than hitting a receiver in motion. The true work is done by those receiving passes from Rudolph. The first target turning around off his diving board bounce to catch and pass back to Rudolph may have been the most impressive part of it all, but the jet skie receiver had to time his position just right and catch the ball, potentially with some wet hands. Good job all around.

Helmet sticker to The Student Section.

Washington receiver leaves Huskies to combat depression and anxiety

SEATTLE, WA - SEPTEMBER 26: Washington Huskies head coach Chris Petersen walks on the sidelines during a game against the California Golden Bears at Husky Stadium on September 26, 2015 in Seattle, Washington. California won the game 30-24. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
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Washington wide receiver Isaiah Renfro is leaving the program after missing spring football to deal with some personal issues. Renfro announced on Sunday, via Twitter, he took time in the spring to receive treatment for a battle with depression. The true freshman explained he lost his passion for the game of football in the process and says he is stepping away from the sport and will not attend Washington.

“This year has to be one of the toughest times I’ve had to endure in my life,” Renfro explained in a lengthy Twitter post. “While going through this year I have struggled with and have been diagnosed with depression and anxiety. Everyday [sic] it’s very hard for me to just do a simple thing like get myself out of bed in the morning. This entire year I pushed through and gave it my all, till I had none left. I hate failure so I felt like I’d be cheating myself by quitting. But I started to see myself changing… I wasn’t the same, I lost love for the game I’ve been playing ever since I could walk, and it seemed more like a job to me than fun.”

Renfro was a three-star recruit out of California in the Class of 2015 according to Rivals, which was the first class under a full recruiting cycle for Washington head coach since being hired away by Boise State.  He appeared in all 13 games played by Washington last season, in which he caught 13 passes for 178 yards.

This Memorial Day, take time to remember

ARLINGTON, VA - MAY 27:  A member of the U.S. Army Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), salutes after placing a flag on a grave stone at Arlington National Cemetary May 27, 2004 in Arlington, Virginia. An event called "Flags In" takes place before every Memorial Day weekend in honor of those veterans who have lost their lives.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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(Reprinted and reposted with permission for a seventh straight year from, well, me.)

You have to admit that, despite the financial woes and political in-fighting and every other really crappy thing going on, we have a pretty damn good life, living in these United States of America.  It’s a far-from-perfect country, but, dammit, it’s ours.  Ours because our own have and will continue to shed their blood in the ultimate sacrifice.  Gave and will continue to give their lives, their hopes, their dreams so that we — and our children and our children’s children and their children — may live and realize ours and theirs.

As you go about your day today, doing whatever it is that you do on Memorial Day, take a second or two or sixty — or more — to reflect on what exactly this day is all about.

Please.  Just take a moment.  Take a moment to God bless those who have given so much.

God bless those who have paid the ultimate price for the freedom we enjoy day-in and day-out.

God bless those hundreds of thousands who’ve lost fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, sons and daughters in the ultimate sacrifice paid forward to every single one of us, for our freedoms.

And thank you — thank you, thank you, thank you with every fiber of my being — to those who continue serving this country and keeping this great nation safe.

And, again, God bless families torn apart and made lesser by the heartbreaking losses, hellish and unthinkable holes in the soul that allow us to do whatever the hell it is we want to on this day and every other day of the year…

Florida AD Jeremy Foley suggests no long-term revival of Gators-Hurricanes

MIAMI GARDENS, FL - SEPTEMBER 07: Quinton Dunbar #1 of the Florida Gators is tackled by Stacy Coley #3 of the Miami Hurricanes during a game  at Sun Life Stadium on September 7, 2013 in Miami Gardens, Florida.  (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
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The Florida Gators play Florida State every year, and that appears to be the only school from the ACC Florida will continue to play annually. Sorry, Miami.

Florida Athletics Director Jeremy Foley was a guest on WRUF in Gainesville, where he was on to discuss a number of various Florida sports topics. Among them, of course, was a question about the future of the Florida-Miami series, if you can even call it a series these days. Foley did not leave much room for the possibility of a long-term series with the Hurricanes.

“No, I do not see them on our schedule on a regular basis,” Foley said. “I think when you’re asking your football team to play eight games in this league and Florida State? That’s a tough slate. This league is obviously as good as it gets, and Florida State is as good as it gets.”

SEC schools are locked to an eight-game conference schedule and must schedule one opponent from another power conference each year. The ACC has a similar rule, and Florida and Florida State each meet their respective conferences’ scheduling rules with their annual series at the end of the regular season. Miami has no such power conference rival to work with, so the Hurricanes are forced to look elsewhere to satisfy their scheduling requirements.

Florida and Miami are scheduled to open the 2019 season against each other in Orlando, but that is the only game in the foreseeable future for a pair of power conference programs that once played on an annual basis until 1987. Since 1987, Florida and Miami have played just six games, including a pair of postseason bowl games.

Helmet sticker to Gridiron Now.