McQueary to file whistleblower suit against Penn State

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The legal ramifications for Penn State stemming from the Jerry Sandusky child-sex abuse scandal continues six months after the ex-defensive coordinator’s arrest, with another former assistant on Joe Paterno‘s coaching staff setting in motion a lawsuit against the university.

The Centre Daily Times reported Tuesday evening that Mike McQueary has begun the process of filing what’s described by the paper as a whistleblower lawsuit.  The Daily Times wrote that “[t]he attorney for McQueary filed a writ of summons for a civil case in county court today”, which serves as notice to the university that they are being sued.

Because of its designation as a whistleblower lawsuit, the paper notes, McQueary will be seeking damages outside normal arbitration limits.

The specifics of the suit, including the amount of monetary damages McQueary will be seeking, are unclear at this time.

Early last year, McQueary testified in front of a grand jury investigating allegations made against Sandusky by multiple alleged victims who were underage at the time of the sexual assaults, claiming that he witnessed some type of incident involving a naked Sandusky and a naked 10-year-old boy in a Lasch football building shower on the PSU campus in 2002 (more on that date in a bit).

After speaking to his father from a phone in the football building immediately following the alleged assault, McQueary and his dad took the information to Paterno the following day, with then-athletic director Tim Curley, former vice president Gary Schultz — whose job also included serving as head of the campus police department — and former president Graham Spanier also informed of the alleged assault.  How those PSU officials handled the allegations led directly to the firing of Paterno and Spanier, as well as charges against Curley and Schultz.

McQueary was placed on administrative leave shortly after the allegations came to light last November.  The former wide receivers coach remains on the payroll at Penn State, the Patriot-News confirmed.  It had previously been hinted that federal whistleblower laws prevented the university from cutting ties with McQueary.

In other news related to the Sandusky case, which is scheduled to go to trial June 5, and also involving McQueary, the Patriot-News reported this morning that a judge has changed the date of the alleged sexual assault in PSU’s football building that we mentioned above.

According to the paper, the “[c]riminal paperwork in the case against Sandusky no longer says that the alleged crime happened in March 2002. Instead, Judge John Cleland allowed prosecutors to say it happened Feb. 9, 2001.”

McQueary had previously stated he witnessed the incident prior to the start of spring break in 2002.

The attorneys for Curley and Schultz pounced on the change, saying in a statement that “[n]ow, it is clear that Mike McQueary was wrong in so adamantly insisting that the incident happened the Friday before Spring Break in 2002.”  McQueary’s credibility in recalling and recounting the events of that night has already been called into question in the past.

The statement ended with the attorneys claiming one charge against their clients will be dropped on a technicality.

“Whether or not Mr. McQueary’s insistence was the result of faulty memory, or questionable credibility, there is no dispute that the statute of limitations has expired on (the failure to report charge), and it will be dismissed.”

Both men have been charged with failure to report and perjury, the latter stemming from their appearance in front of the grand jury.

An attorney not involved in the litigation told the Associated Press that the change in date should have no impact on the Sandusky case.  Maybe.

“If all the other facts match up to be identical, I think it’s just an error without any harm for the prosecution,” Scranton defense lawyer Joseph D’Andrea told the AP. “However, if there are other inconsistencies, it gives the defense a reason to create some doubt about the credibility, sincerity, honesty and true recollection of what McQueary had to say.”

A gag order has been issued by the judge presiding over the Sandusky case, so neither prosecutors nor defense attorneys will comment on today’s developments.

WR Devaughn Cooper no longer part of Arizona football team

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Devaughn Cooper had been expected to be one of Arizona’s breakout players this coming season after an impressive spring. Unfortunately for both the player and the program, that won’t be the case.

The Wildcats released their updated roster Friday and, somewhat surprisingly, Cooper’s name wasn’t on it. It’s unclear what exactly the circumstances were surrounding the wide receiver’s departure, although one report had it taking place earlier this month.

Cooper was a three-star 2016 recruit, and only three players in the Wildcats’ class were rated higher than the California high school product.

After sitting out the 2016 opener, Cooper played the next two weeks in wins over Grambling and Hawaii. His first career catch, for 15 yards, came in the latter game; unfortunately, an injury in the same game sidelined him for the remainder of the season.

Cooper received a medical redshirt for 2016.

Three of the Wildcats’ top receivers from a year ago are no longer with the football program because of expired eligibility. Given the dearth of experienced returning talent, players such as Cooper were expected to play major roles in making up for the lost production.

Shun Brown, who led the team in receiving yards (521) and yards per catch (18.0) last season, is Rich Rodriguez‘s top returning receiver. He was also tied for the team lead in receiving touchdowns with three and second in receptions with 29.

Ed Orgeron boots media out of LSU’s preseason camp

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From the swamp to the bayou, the war on the media apparently knows no bounds.

The Baton Rouge Advocate reports that Ed Orgeron has significantly reversed the openness of the program and completely shut out media access to LSU’s preseason camp this year, blocking an outside look into the Tigers’ practice for the first time.

“The complete closure of camp practices could be a first ever for the school, and LSU appears to be the only program in the Southeastern Conference to have done so,” the paper said. “All other schools plan or have allowed reporters into practice for at least one day of drills, according to camp schedules obtained by The Advocate.”

Players are set to report to camp on Sunday, with the team’s first practice the following day. LSU provided a statement that said the school will provide video and photos of practice each day but each will obviously be vary controlled in terms of content.

The restrictive new policies with the media are quite the reversal for Orgeron, who once coached in front of hundreds of fans and media members while an assistant under Pete Carroll at USC and later opened up practices to reporters in Los Angeles as interim head coach of the Trojans. Even during his first head coaching stop at fellow SEC school Ole Miss, the raspy-voiced cajun held open practices early during his tenure in Oxford.

Sadly closed practices are becoming all the norm in college football and after previously being much more open than Les Miles was the past few years, Orgeron appears to be joining the trend and giving the boot to the media at LSU’s practices.

Ole Miss releases names of boosters in NCAA case… and also hires new OL coach

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Ole Miss can take solace that in the fact that their news dump was blown off most front pages in the state by far more important news dumps from elsewhere in the country but the Rebels still made plenty of noise on Friday.

First, the school released the names of the vast majority of the boosters involved in the school’s on-going NCAA infractions case. Ole Miss has previously redacted most of the names in the two Notices of Allegations sent to the school by the enforcement staff. Following a court case related to the matter and numerous squabbles with various parties, the state ethics commission eventually told the university to release the names.

Per the Jackson Clarion-Ledger:

“Those names were revealed Friday when the university released its two Notice of Allegations and published all but two of the booster names. There were 14 boosters involved included in the Notice of Allegations and they were tied to more than half of Ole Miss’ 15 Level I violations. The football program itself faces 21 alleged violations.”

While the release of such information alone would have made for a busy Friday, there was still plenty more to check off in Oxford.

The school also announced the hiring of a new offensive line coach in Jack Bicknell Jr. to fill the vacancy left when Matt Luke was promoted to head coach in the wake of Hugh Freeze’s resignation. Bicknell has been coaching offensive line in the NFL since 2009 with four different franchises but is no stranger to the college game having been the former head coach at Louisiana Tech. He also had two stints as a coach at Boston College in addition to a stop at New Hampshire.

Perhaps most notably, Bicknell played for the Eagles back in the mid-80’s under his father of the same name and is best known for being the center for Heisman Trophy winner Doug Flutie.

Coastal Carolina head coach Joe Moglia will miss 2017 season to recover from health issues

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Coastal Carolina will transition to the FBS level this season but will unfortunately have to do so without their head coach.

Yahoo! Sports first reported the news on Friday that Chanticleers coach Joe Moglia will miss the upcoming 2017 season, as recent health issues will force him to take a five-month medical sabbatical.

“For three years now, I have had a bronchial asthmatic reaction to allergies, which causes inflammation around my lungs. The inflammation restricts the lungs, which could create a serious breathing problem,” Moglia said in a statement released by the school. “I want to be clear: I do not have a disease and I am in no danger, but I do need to get this addressed. Dr. David DeCenzo, the president of CCU, has offered me a medical sabbatical for the next five months, which I’m going to take.

“The doctors and I are confident that this will take care of the problem, and I will be 100% ready to go by the end of the season.”

Mogila had precautionary surgery on his trachea last week that caused him to miss Sun Belt Media Day but it appears he will still need some added time to recover.

The 68-year-old former financial CEO turned head coach has led Coastal Carolina since 2012 and gone 51-15 at the school, all at the FCS level. Associate head coach and offensive coordinator Jamey Chadwell took Mogila’s place at media day last week and was named the interim head coach for the rest of the 2017 season.

The Chanticleers open the season on September 2nd against UMass.