Chief Osceola

FSU board ‘unanimously in favor of seeing what Big 12 might offer’

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Oh boy.  Here we go.  Again.

Rumor and speculation has bubbled just below the surface for weeks connecting Florida State — and Clemson to some degree as well — to a potential move to the Big 12.  Such smoke has been dismissed by most national observers as well as the school’s athletic department, with athletic director Randy Spetman issuing a statement just yesterday attempting to quash the speculation.

“We’re in the ACC. We’re committed to the ACC,” Spetman said in the statement. “That’s where our president and the board of trustees has committed to, so we’re great partners in the ACC.”

Yeah, about that whole “board of trustees being onboard with the ACC as a great partner” thing…

In an exclusive interview with WarChant.com, FSU Board of Trustees chairman Andy Haggard blasted the ACC and its recently-negotiated television deal, skewering the league for retaining its third-tier media rights for basketball while giving them away for football.  Perhaps most damaging to both the ACC and FSU’s credibility, though, is Haggard publicly hiking up his university’s skirt and openly courting some heavy petting from the Big 12.

“How do you not look into that option,” asked Haggard. “On behalf of the Board of Trustees I can say that unanimously we would be in favor of seeing what the Big 12 might have to offer. We have to do what is in Florida State’s best interest.”

[/tosses mic]

So, in one fell swoop, Haggard has not only undermined his current conference, but, perhaps more importantly, he’s undermined the very public words of the head of his own athletic department.

It should be noted that, the website writes, “Haggard confirmed that as far as he knows there has been no contact between FSU and the Big 12 regarding possible expansion.”  Based on Haggard’s very public rebuke of both the ACC and Spetman, he’d better hope that changes at some point in the future.

The new TV agreement reached between ESPN and the ACC would pay each conference member an average of $17 million annually over the life of a contract that will run through the 2026-2027 academic year.  Such an arrangement would put the ACC behind but near the payouts for the Big 12 ($20 million) and Pac-12 ($22 million) but well behind the Big Ten (gazillions) and SEC (gazillions once its deal is tweaked in the coming months).  As football is the driving force behind the mega-TV deals, and the product the ACC puts on the field Saturdays’ in the fall is undeniably inferior to the four aforementioned conferences, the compensation ACC members will receive falls very much in line when compared to the rest of the market.

Still, despite the obvious lack of football prowess contributing to a smaller bottom line, Haggard simply can’t wrap his head around his school’s current conference kowtowing to a state a little bit further north and a sport centered in the same region.

“It’s mind-boggling and shocking,” said Haggard. “How can the ACC give up third tier rights for football but keep them for basketball? …

“It continues the perception that the ACC favors the North Carolina schools.”

Add it all up, and what we have here is a complete and utter mess for both the ACC and FSU thanks to Haggard’s decision to come out with both lips blazing.  We’ll be anxiously awaiting responses from conference commissioner John Swofford and Spetman, if they come at all.

Until then, strap in.  It appears were might be on the verge of a third-straight offseason of expansion.

Yippie?!?

Former 5-star Chris Casher no longer on Florida State roster

TALLAHASSEE, FL - NOVEMBER 16: Chris Casher #21 of the Florida State Seminoles runs in a fumble made by Terrel Hunt #10 of the Syracuse Orange during the Second half at Doak Campbell Stadium on November 16, 2013 in Tallahassee, Florida. The Seminoles beat the Orange 59-3.(Photo by Jeff Gammons/Getty Images)
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It seemed clear by now Chris Casher would never fulfill the promise he arrived to Tallahassee with five seasons ago.

Rated the No. 3 defensive end in the class of 2012 by 247Sports, Casher suffered a season-ending injury two games into his 2012 campaign, then never accumulated more than 28 tackles in a season before moving to tight end before this season.

“He was a very, very good receiver out of high school,” ‘Noles head coach Jimbo Fisher told the Palm Beach Post this spring. “He is a really good basketball player. He has a lot of natural offensive skill. … catches the ball and has natural hands.

“When I played quarterback, I knew who I wanted to throw it to. And the guys that caught my eye. So our guys have been bragging about him. We’ll see what he does.”

But Fisher confirmed Friday Casher is no longer on the roster.

Casher was placed a one-year probation by Florida State for his involvement in the Jameis Winston sexual assault case and, according to USA Today, was briefly detained alongside Winston by FSU police for carrying a pellet gun on campus.

The reason for Casher’s departure was not known at press time.

Louisville LB Trevon Young to take medical redshirt

LOUISVILLE, KY - OCTOBER 24:  Trevon Young #91 of the Louisville Cardinals celebrates a defensive stop against the Boston College Eagles at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium on October 24, 2015 in Louisville, Kentucky.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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Louisville linebacker Trevon Young will miss the 2016 season to continue recovering from a dislocated and fractured him suffered in the Cardinals’ Music City Bowl victory over Texas A&M. Head coach Bobby Petrino confirmed the news Friday at ACC media days.

“We’re going to miss Trevon,” Petrino said 93.9 The Ville, via Card Chronicle. “He’s very, very good player, particularly on third down. He put a lot of pressure on the quarterbacks, made some big plays to help us win games. He was really stressing out about trying to come back for this season, and he just got to a point where he didn’t better for a while. So I think it’s been a relief to him to know that he’s redshirting. His mother tells me that it’s really helped relieve some anxiety that he was going through. He still has a very bright future ahead of him.”

A senior out of Council Bluffs, Iowa, by way of Iowa Western Community College, Young finished the ’15 season with 32 tackles, 10 TFLs and ranked 33rd nationally with 8.5 sacks. He was an Honorable Mention All-ACC performer.

Young has not used a redshirt season yet, meaning he will be automatically eligible to return in 2017.

 

ACC has no immediate plans to move football title game out of Charlotte following HB2

CHARLOTTE, NC - DECEMBER 05:  Deshaun Watson #4 of the Clemson Tigers runs the ball against Donnie Miles #15 of the North Carolina Tar Heels in the 2nd half during the Atlantic Coast Conference Football Championship at Bank of America Stadium on December 5, 2015 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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The NBA moved its All-Star Game out of Charlotte earlier this week out of backlash to controversial law House Bill 2, but ACC commissioner John Swofford said at his conference’s media days there is no immediate plan to follow suit with the league’s football championship game.

“We had a long discussion about this issue in May at our spring meetings, and at that time made the determination as to where our championships would be held for the ’16-17 year,” Swofford told ESPN. “Whatever we do won’t be because of what the NBA does. And I don’t mean that disrespectfully. We’ll do what we think is right and best for the Atlantic Coast Conference.

“Right now what our schools want to do is to see how this plays out and where it ends up, because it’s still in process to one degree or another and the courts may well ultimately decide that.”

Many view the passing of HB2 as discriminatory to the transgender community. Others view it as a necessary law to protect women and children.

The ACC said in May it would monitor the situation and require “commitments to provide safe and inclusive environments from sites for which there are current commitments for ACC championships.” Swofford said Thursday the conference would revisit the topic at its meetings in October.

“The next time we’re together is October for our fall meetings and, depending on what’s happened at that point in time, I’m sure our schools will want to have some further discussion about it,” Swofford told the Charlotte Observer.

The ACC has held its football championship game at Charlotte’s Bank of America Stadium since 2010. The Charlotte championship games have been significantly better attended than their predecessors in Jacksonville and Tampa.

The ACC has agreed to hold its title game in Charlotte through 2019. The ACC’s men’s basketball tournament has commonly taken place in Greensboro, N.C., but moves to Brooklyn’s Barclays Center over the next two seasons before returning to Charlotte in 2019 and Greensboro in 2020. The ACC is headquartered in Greensboro, N.C.

UGA RB AJ Turman transferring to FAU

BOCA RATON, FL - OCTOBER 31:  Florida Atlantic Owls players celebrate after defeating the FIU Golden Panthers in the game at FAU Stadium on October 31, 2015 in Boca Raton, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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You’re likely aware of the injury trouble beset upon Georgia’s running backs room in recent years. There was Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall and Sony Michel and Nick Chubb, each of whom spent his fair share of time on the shelf.

But also dealing with injuries over the past two seasons was A.J. Turman. Turman redshirted in 2014 and did not accumulate a carry in 2015.

In an odd way, Turman’s biggest mark on Georgia football didn’t pop up until he decided to leave. His case became the tempest for Kirby Smart‘s restrictive transfer policy. Initially, Smart released Turman to schools only in Florida but not Florida or Miami. He eventually relented, barring him only from SEC schools and Georgia Tech, but Turman has decided to move on to Florida Atlantic.

“It was hard at first, just leaving Georgia and everything, the fans and all my good friends. I love Georgia, I still do. I just feel like it’s the best thing for me,” Turman told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “I was blessed to have the opportunity that a lot of schools were still interested in me. I took a lot of visits.  … It’s been a long journey, but I’m just glad it’s at an end, and I can go on and play football.”

Turman will have to sit out 2016, but hopes to gain back a year through a medical redshirt. “And it’s looking like I should be able to get it,” he said.