Aztecs aiding Boise in Big East move

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A year and a month or so ahead of its scheduled move from the Mountain West to the Big East, Boise State is reportedly having second thoughts about the conference switch, with its current league apparently launching a last-ditch effort to keep the Broncos from leaving.  Adding further fuel to the speculative fire, Boise has yet to officially notify the MWC of its intent to withdraw from the conference.

The reasons for Boise reportedly getting cold feet are myriad, chief among them one that has absolutely nothing to do with football, the sole reason for the intended move to the Big East in the first place.

Boise’s departure to the Big East is a football-only move, with the school’s other sports — the lone exception being wrestling, which is remaining in the Pac-12 — expected to be parked in the WAC beginning next year.  Given the upheaval in that conference, and valid concerns that league will cease to exist at some point in the not-too-distant future, Boise has enlisted the help of the Big East in finding a more stable home for its other sports.  As it turns out, BSU’s also getting a little help from its travel partner.

San Diego State will be heading to the Big East along with Boise in 2013, and the San Diego Union-Tribune writes that the school is looking to help the Broncos find a viable home for its non-football sports.  The Aztecs will also become a football-only member of the Big East, but its other sports will be parked in the much stabler Big West.  SDSU would like to see Boise’s sports in the Big West, but that conference, with all of its schools currently located in California — Hawaii will join in all sports but football in 2012 — is bucking against adding Boise due to the additional travel costs that would be associated with the move.

SDSU, though, may hold some leverage over its new non-football conference.  If the Big West continues to push against adding Boise, and if the Broncos are forced to remain in the MWC — that conference will not allow any school to take its football program and leave its other sports — SDSU will have a choice to make: stay the course and make a solo move to the Big East, or remain in the MWC.  And pull its non-football sports from the Big West.

Thus, SDSU could pressure the Big West, whose nine current members include Long Beach State and UC Santa Barbara among others, into getting past another set of travel concerns, or else risk losing what would be its top basketball program as well as several high-caliber Olympic sports programs.

Another possibility raised by the Union-Tribune is the WAC reconstituting itself as a non-football-playing conference.  With all of the attrition the conference has experienced over the past two years, the WAC will likely be left with two football-playing members in 2013 — New Mexico State and Idaho.  The latter is already discussing the option of dropping back down to the Div. 1-AA (FCS) level, leaving the Aggies in football limbo.  The conference also recently added the University of Denver, Seattle University and UT-Arlington as non-football members, which means its future membership could consist of anywhere from three to five members, pending which direction current members Idaho and NMSU head.

How viable that conference would be even with Boise’s non-football sports is open for discussion.

Another “weapon” SDSU can hold over the Big West’s head?  If Boise decides to remain in the MWC, the terms of SDSU’s agreement with the Big East would allow that school to renege on its easterly move without paying an exit penalty.

“For clarity, neither party shall be obligated hereunder in the event that the conference does not have as a member on (July 1, 2013) at least one football-playing institution that is located west of the Rocky Mountains,” the contract states.

Boise, on the other hand, would be forced to pay a $5 million exit fee if it informs the Big East June 30 or earlier this year that it’s staying in the MWC, and $10 million if it makes the decision on or after that date.

Michigan State, Washington round out future schedules with Utah State

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Needing to fill a single spot in some future schedules, both Michigan State and Washington have come calling to the Mountain West for an opponent. Utah State was happy to oblige.

Michigan State will host Utah State on September 1, 2018. The Aggies will travel to Washington on September 19, 2020. For their travels, Utah State will collect $2.9 million between the two games, according to FBScheduels.com ($1.4 million from Michigan State, $1.5 million from Washington).

The Big Ten and Pac-12 each use nine-game conference schedules, leaving three spots open for non-conference games. The Big Ten requires all conference members schedule one game per season against another power conference opponent (the Pac-12 has no such requirement of its members at this time), although exceptions are made. Utah State, as a member of the Mountain West Conference, would not satisfy that requirement for the Big Ten, but the Spartans already have a road game against Arizona State (Pac-12) on the schedule in 2018. Michigan State and Arizona State will play again in 2019 in East Lansing. Michigan State also has future power conference matchups with Notre Dame (2017, 2026, 2027) and Miami (2020, 2021). Michigan State will also play BYU in 2020 in Provo.

Washington has future power conference matchups with Rutgers (2017), Auburn (2018, in Atlanta), and Michigan (2020, 2021). The Huskies will also face Mountain West Competition from Fresno State (2017), Hawaii (2019), and Nevada (2027).

Utah State will face power conference opponents on the road in 2017 (Wisconsin, Wake Forest), 2018 (Michigan State), 2019 (Wake Forest, LSU), 2020 (Washington), and 2021 (Washington State). Utah State will also host Washington State in 2020 as part of a home-and-home deal. Utah State also has an annual series against BYU running through 2020.

Old Dominion hopes to “hit the ground running” on new stadium project

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Some fans of the Old Dominion football program may be getting a little impatient with the progress (or lack of) in the development of the football stadium, but Old Dominion athletic director Wood Selig says things are coming along nicely and progress will start to be seen soon enough.

“Once we get the architects engaged, we’ll figure out what $55 million will buy in 2019 dollars,” Selig said, according to The Virginian-Pilot. “Then we’ll have an idea for how much additional money needs to be raised to support the project.”

Old Dominion is planning on tearing down Foreman Field at the end of the 2018 season and rebuild it with modern seating and amenities. The $55 million project remained on the books in the Virginia budget in February, allowing the university to move ahead with their plans. The first step is finding an architect to take on the job.

Because Old Dominion’s football stadium is among the smallest in the nation and will remain so even after the rebuild and renovations, the entire project is expected to move fairly swiftly once the work actually begins. Old Dominion isn’t building a grand football palace, so any concerns over the lack of updates on the stadium should be calmed.

If nothing else, the concerns raised about the lack of updates on the stadium renovations may just mean Old Dominion has some eager fans excited about the future of the program.

Baylor interim president to Texas senators: “We were not trying to cover up what happened at Baylor”

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Texas senators are taking aim at Baylor University and are hoping to persuade the university to be more open and transparent despite being a private university.

Baylor interim president David Garland faced criticism from senators during a hearing with the Senate Higher Education Committee on Wednesday regarding the coverup of rape accusations found throughout the football program in recent years.

“We were not trying to cover up what happened at Baylor,” Garland said to the committee. Unfortunately for Garland, that was far from enough to sway the senators on the committee from playing nice with him and Baylor University.

I’m sorry, but I don’t buy that for a minute,” Senator Kel Seliger replied, according to The Texas Tribune. “I don’t buy that for a minute. I think that is exactly what was going on.”

The exchange between the interim president at Baylor and the senator came during a hearing regarding a state bill that requires any school receiving more than $5 million in Tuition Equalization Grants from the state to comply with open records and open meetings laws in the state of Texas. Baylor, being a private university, believes it should not have to comply with the bill, which would open up the doors to more information regarding Baylor’s handling of vile accusations within its university and athletics department.

The exchange comes a day after Baylor moved to dismiss a lawsuit claiming 52 rapes over a three-year period occurred at the university.

If you thought the ugliness around the Baylor situation was going to be limited to athletics, you thought wrong. This is clearly a state-wide concern and battle now. And things are always bigger in Texas, right?

A&M-UCLA opener in 2017 moved from Saturday to Sunday

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Grab your calendars as there’s been a change to your opening(ish) weekend college football agenda.

Texas A&M road trip to UCLA is one of a handful of high-profile games that will help launch the 2017 season Labor Day weekend.  The game, which will be played at the famed Rose Bowl, had been originally scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 2.  However, it was announced Wednesday that the game will be pushed back to Sunday, Sept. 3.

The game will kick off at either 7:30 or 8 p.m. ET, with the actual time being determined at a later date.

This year’s game will serve as the back-end of a home-and-home series between the two schools.  The Aggies claimed a 31-24 win over the Bruins in overtime last season in College Station.

The 2017 season will actually commence the weekend of Aug. 26 with five games featuring FBS teams, including Stanford against Rice in Australia and Colorado State opening their new on-campus stadium against Oregon State.  The first full weekend kicks off the following Thursday — Ohio State-Indiana highlights that day’s lean slate — and continues with a handful of games the next day — hello Colorado-Colorado State, Washington-Rutgers and Utah State-Wisconsin among others.

The first full Saturday features the likes of Alabama-Florida State, Florida-Michigan, West Virginia-Virginia Tech, LSU-BYU, Louisville-Purdue, Cal-North Carolina, Maryland-Texas and South Carolina-North Carolina State squaring off Sept. 2.

A&M-UCLA is the only Sunday game, while Tennessee and Georgia Tech will close out the weekend at the brand-new Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta Labor Day night that Monday.