Beth Jenkins

Paterno family condemns ‘leaking of selective emails’


Even with a jury of his peers convicting Jerry Sandusky more than a week ago of being a serial pedophile, the scandal that’s dominated headlines in and out of the world of college football since last November shows no signs of slowing down.  At all.

As Ben wrote late last week, a CNN report detailed new emails exchanged among PSU administrators in 2001 suggesting there was a planned cover-up for Sandusky beginning 16 days after former Nittany Lions assistant coach Mike McQueary allegedly saw Sandusky in the showers of an on-campus facility with a young boy.

The leak of emails and other information related to what looks, walks and talks like a coverup at the highest level of the Penn State administration has continued to erode the legacy of several former school officials, including iconic ex-head coach Joe Paterno.  It was intimated in those emails obtained by CNN through unknown sources that Paterno had knowledge of the decision to not report the allegations made against Sandusky to authorities outside the university.

In response to that report the family of the deceased coach released a statement stressing that “Paterno warned against a rush to judgment in this case” and he “testified truthfully, to the best of his recollection,” referring to the coach’s eight-minute appearance in front of a grand jury early last year.

Three days later, the family has released another statement, condemning the “the leaking of selective emails over the last few days” and “calling on the Freeh Group and the Attorney General’s office to immediately release all emails and records they have related to this case.”

Here’s the statement, in its entirety.

With the leaking of selective emails over the last few days, it is clear that someone in a position of authority is not interested in a fair or thorough investigation. To be clear, the Paterno family does not know the source or sources of these leaks.  The question that needs to be asked is why this breach of confidentiality, which seeks to preempt the Freeh report and undermine the courts, is not being objected to or otherwise addressed by those in a position of authority. It should not be the responsibility of the Paterno family to call for an honest, independent investigation. Given the seriousness and complexity of this case, everyone should be demanding the full truth, not just carefully selected excerpts of certain emails.

Releasing these emails in this way is not intended to inform the discussion but to smear former Penn State officials, including Joe Paterno. The truth is Joe Paterno reported the 2001 incident promptly and fully. He was interviewed by the Grand Jury for a total of 8 minutes and told the truth to the best of his recollection. He was never interviewed by the University. He was not afforded due process and his story was never fully told.  And he was never allowed to see the files and records that are now in question. In spite of these facts, however, numerous pundits and critics are exploiting these disconnected and distorted records to attack Joe Paterno.

Accordingly, the Paterno family today is calling on the Freeh Group and the Attorney General’s office to immediately release all emails and records they have related to this case. The public should not have to try and piece together a story from a few records that have been selected in a calculated way to manipulate public opinion. Joe Paterno didn’t fear the truth, he sought the truth. His guidance to his family and his advisors was to pursue the full truth.  This is the course we have followed for 9 months. It is the course we will follow to the end.

The Freeh Group is headed by former FBI director Louis Freeh and is charged with conducting the school’s independent internal investigation into the scandal.  The full report is expected to be released later this year.

Sandusky was convicted last month  on 45 count relating to the sexual abuse of 10 children over a 15-year period, some of which occurred on the Penn State campus and in the football building’s locker room and/or showers.

The school is bracing itself for a slew of civil lawsuits that have already been or will be filed in the not-too-distant future.

Dismissed Wolverine Logan Tuley-Tillman charged with three felonies

Logan Tuley-Tillman
Michigan Athletics

Back on September 10, it was announced that Jim Harbaugh had dismissed Logan Tuley-Tillman for “conduct unacceptable for a Michigan student-athlete.”  Now we know what that unacceptable conduct was.  Allegedly.

Wednesday morning, is reporting, Tuley-Tillman was charged with three felonies stemming from a Sept. 4 incident in which he’s accused of filming a sex act with a woman without her knowledge. Tuley-Tillman was officially charged with two counts of capturing/distributing an image of an unclothed person and one count of using a computer to commit a crime.

From the report:

Capturing/distributing an image of an unclothed person is punishable by up to two years in prison, a fine of no more than $2,000, or both. Using a computer to commit a crime, in this case, would be punishable by up to 10 years in prison, a fine of no more than $5,000, or both.

The incident occurred in the 300 block of Catherine Street Sept. 4. Tuley-Tillman is accused of filming a portion of a sexual encounter with a woman without her knowledge and then transmitting it to his personal device without her permission, according to Ann Arbor police.

Tuley-Tillman was a four-star member of Brady Hoke‘s second-to-last UM recruiting class, rated as the No. 24 offensive tackle in the country and the No. 7 player at any position in the state of Illinois.  He played in one game as a redshirt freshman last season, the season opener against Appalachian State.

This season, he had been listed as the No. 2 left tackle and played in the 2015 opener.

WVU loses All-Big 12 DB Karl Joseph to season-ending knee injury

MORGANTOWN, WV - SEPTEMBER 29:  Karl Joseph #8 of the West Virginia Mountaineers tackles Jarred Salubi #21 of the Baylor Bears during the game on September 29, 2012 at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia.  WVU defeated Baylor 70-63.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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One of the most talented players on the defensive side of the ball not only in the Big 12 but in the country has seen his season come to an abrupt end.

West Virginia head coach Dana Holgorsen announced Tuesday that Karl Joseph will miss the remainder of the 2015 season because of an injury to his right knee.  The hard-hitting safety sustained the injury in a non-contact drill during practice Tuesday.

The injury also marks the end of Joseph’s collegiate playing career as he’s off to the NFL next spring.

“I am devastated and heartbroken for Karl,” Holgorsen said in a statement. “He is a young man who has given everything he has to our football program and University over the past four years and who elected to return to WVU for his senior season to earn his degree and to be a part of something special with this team. He exemplifies what it means to be a Mountaineer. Karl is an All-American, a fierce competitor, a leader and I know he will have a full recovery, and I can’t wait to watch him on Sundays next fall.”

Joseph started all 42 games in which he played for the Mountaineers. He was first-team All-Big 12 last season, and his name littered numerous preseason All-American teams this year.

“I want to thank my teammates and my coaches for their outpouring of support,” Joseph said. “This has been difficult for me and my family but I know I will come through this stronger than ever. I will forever be a Mountaineer and will be cheering on our team every step of the way.”