Five questions the Freeh report should (hopefully) answer


In a little under 12 hours from now, the Freeh report investigating Penn State’s actions in the Jerry Sandusky scandal will come to light.

Leaked emails to multiple media outlets over the past several weeks suggest the contents of the report will be nothing short of devastating to the upstanding reputation PSU has spent decades building. Most notably, the emails hint that several people, possibly including former coach Joe Paterno, willingly covered up incidents of child-sex abuse by Sandusky. But, outside of those select messages sent among university admins, we know almost nothing about the details of the report.

The lack of information, the absence of true details, has been perhaps the most frustrating portion of the Sandusky scandal from its beginning because it’s left us with nothing but questions. How could a man convicted of 45 counts of child sex abuse have been allowed to prey on young boys using his charity, The Second Mile, and his university as avenues for as long as he did?

Rightfully so, you want answers. I want answers.

Will we get all the answers we want? Certainly not. I would even count on more questions being raised.

But, for now, here’s what I’m looking for in the Freeh report:

1. Exactly what did Paterno do when informed by Mike McQueary of the Sandusky allegation in 2001?
This should be obvious. Paterno’s actions in the Sandusky scandal have been the lead talking points since the story broke open last November. I’m a firm believer that Paterno should not — nor will not — be the only person blamed in this tragedy. There are others, perhaps several depending on the information provided in the results of the investigation, who deserve equal if not greater scrutiny. But I also believe Paterno was not just a head coach and to suggest that the face of an institution of higher education was somehow able to do no more than pass a message up the proverbial chain of command is insulting.

Which leads me to question 1b: did Paterno fail to do the right thing, or purposefully look the other way? Emails obtained by CNN claim that former Penn State VP Gary Schultz had planned to contact the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare in 2001, but that changed following a conversation, presumably with Paterno.

2. Who else knew of the allegations and remained silent or otherwise aided in a possible cover-up?
To date, there are five members of Penn State who have been identified as major players in this story: McQueary, Paterno, Schultz, athletic director Tim Curley and former president Graham Spanier. Who else inside Penn State, if anyone, knew about allegations against Sandusky, or perhaps noticed odd behavior from Sandusky themselves? Emails obtained by CNN show former VP of student affairs Vicky Triponey had heated arguments with Curley and Spanier over the supposed culture of the athletic department, which apparently preferred to handle matters internally. Yes, Triponey had an ax to grind, but a culture is not limited to the actions of one or two people.

3. Did someone, anyone, at Penn State know about Sandusky’s red flags before 2001?
Penn State officials have given mixed responses on this. Curley said previously he had some recollection of a 1998 investigation of Sandusky, while Schultz claimed to have never heard of it. The misjudgment alone — if that is indeed the case — is despicable considering the subject matter, the person in question and the rank of those who should absolutely be on the same page. I would venture to guess, though, that it wasn’t a miscommunication. Sandusky was an active, high-profile member of his community. Perhaps it is for that reason that if someone did know about his history of being a “likely pedophile” (in the opinion of one child psychologist) that it was never addressed.

4. What’s up with the school’s Board of Trustees?
At least one trustee suspects a cover-up. Several of you have voiced suspicion that the board is in on it too. The curiosity surrounding the board and what they may or may not have known lends itself, at least indirectly, to the two previous questions above. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported in January that the board had been briefed on a Sandusky investigation last year — possibly as early as last May.  Assuming the timeline is correct, that would create a roughly six-month gap between the point where the board was made aware of the investigation and its decision to fire Paterno and Spanier last November.

And, don’t forget, the board has a meeting on Friday.

5. Will there be evidence that piques the interest of the NCAA? 
To be clear, and I’m not alone in this line of thought, I don’t think the NCAA has the jurisdiction to get involved with Penn State, let alone administer something as severe as the death penalty… as of right now. Today, July 11, 2012, the Sandusky scandal and any possible cover-up of his actions is a violation of the law, not of athletic rules. Involving itself with Penn State solely over criminal acts because it breaches some ethical code or bass ackwards “lack of institutional control” rhetoric is shattering the boundaries of the NCAA’s capabilities.

Now, if the Freeh report finds Penn State athletic officials covered up or failed to report an impermissible benefit or practice time overage on a separate occasion, then by all means, the Committee on Infractions can hammer them however it sees fit. But the NCAA cannot, should not, take matters of the law into its own hands.

Gus Malzahn expects Auburn WR who tore ACL in spring to play this year

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What could’ve been significantly bad news now has a brighter side to it.

Last week, wide receiver Eli Stove underwent surgery for a torn ACL that he suffered during Auburn’s first practice of the spring.  While it was thought the injury and subsequent rehab could very well knock the receiver out for the entire season, Gus Malzahn stated that he expects Stove to play at some point in 2018 — perhaps even early in the season.

“We’ll see how everything goes,” the head coach said by way of “He’s in good shape and the surgery went well.”

Six months out from the surgery, a general timeline for ACL rehab, would be mid-September, so it’s not far from the realm of possibility that Stove could see the field the first month of the season.

As a sophomore in 2017, Stove caught 29 passes for 265 yards, the former total which tied him for second on the team  He also ran the ball 30 times for 315 yards and two touchdowns, which made him the Tigers’ third-leading rusher yardage-wise.

E.J. Price apologizes for tweet storm critical of Kentucky coaches; status with UK program still uncertain

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The weird saga that was E.J. Price‘s day Thursday took a couple of additional twists and turns before the clock struck midnight.

On his personal Twitter account yesterday morning, Price announced that he would be “stepping away” from the Kentucky football program. Price also sent out several tweets that seemed to be extremely critical of the UK coaching staff.

Not long after Price’s tweets went viral, he deleted, among others, the one that indicated he was leaving the program; subsequent to that, he set his Twitter account to private. He then sent an apology tweet out to those he now allows to follow him that he “should have handled myself in a much better manner and for that I apologize. I love my team.”

“I would like to apologize to my teammates and coaching staff for taking to Twitter and bringing unwanted attention to our locker room,” another portion of Price’s apology tweet read.

Despite the social-media reversal, a UK spokesperson confirmed that the offensive lineman was no longer a part of the football team. However, head coach Mark Stoops stated after the tweet storm that “E.J. and I have met and we’re going to help him.”

Whether that leaves the door open for an eventual return to Lexington remain to be seen.

Price was a four-star member of USC’s 2016 recruiting class, rated as the No. 8 offensive tackle in the country. He transferred from USC to Kentucky in July of last year.

Because of NCAA transfer rules, Price was forced to sit out the 2017 season.

Injury will cost Arizona State WR John Humphrey entire 2018 season

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Despite this being a new year, John Humphrey simply can’t shake the injury bug.

In 2017, Humphrey missed four games after injuring his knee in Arizona State’s season opener. On Thursday, the rising redshirt junior suffered another injury, albeit significantly more serious than the first as first-year head coach Herm Edwards confirmed that the wide receiver will miss the entire 2018 season because of a ruptured Achilles tendon.

Humphrey was a three-star member of Oklahoma’s 2015 recruiting class, rated as the No. 61 wide receiver in the country and the No. 67 player at any position in the state of Texas. In April of 2016, he announced his decision to transfer from OU; a month later, he announced his decision to transfer to ASU.

After sitting out the 2016 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules, Humphrey put up huge numbers in his Sun Devils debut, catching seven passes for 123 yards and a touchdown in ASU’s season-opening win over New Mexico State. In large part because of that first injury, however, he finished the season with just 13 catches, 177 yards and the one touchdown.

Prior to the second injury, he had been penciled in as a starter for ASU this season.

Tennessee announces $2.5 million ‘amicable resolution’ with ex-athletic director John Currie

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Nearly four months after ostensibly being fired as athletic director, John Currie has an official severance agreement with his former employer.

Tennessee announced Thursday evening that “it has completed an amicable resolution parting ways with former… Vice Chancellor and Director of Athletics John Currie.” Currie had been earning $75,000 a month during a paid suspension; the university stated in its release that Currie will be paid a sum total of $2,220,454 (and 60 cents, for accounting purposes) no later than April 1 of this year.

Additionally, the release noted that Currie “will be paid his salary through March 22, 2018.”

In the midst of a football coaching search fiasco that included a Mike Leach hire that wasn’t, Currie was ousted as the AD at UT on Dec. 1 of last year and replaced by former Vols head football coach Phillip Fulmer.  Between then and today’s announcement, Currie had been technically employed but suspended with pay by the university.

Earlier this month, it was announced that Currie had been hired as an executive-in-residence at Robert Morris University.