CFT Preseason Top 25: No. 20 TCU

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2011 record: 11-2 overall, 7-0 in MWC (1st)

2011 postseason: Poinsettia Bowl (31-24 win over Louisiana Tech)

2011 final AP/coaches’ ranking: No. 14/No. 13

Head coach: Gary Patterson (109-30 overall in 12 seasons at TCU)

Offensive coordinator: Jarrett Anderson (16th season at TCU, fourth as co-OC); Rusty Burns (fourth season at TCU, first as co-OC)

2011 offensive rankings: 19th rushing offense (208.6 ypg); 63rd passing offense (231.6 ypg); 28th total offense (440.2 ypg); 9th scoring offense (40.8 ppg)

Returning offensive starters: six

Defensive coordinator: Dick Bumpas (Ninth season at TCU, ninth as DC)

2011 defensive rankings: 25th rushing defense (123.8 ypg); 60th pass defense (223.6 ypg); 32nd total defense (347.4 ypg); 28th scoring defense (21.5 ppg)

Returning defensive starters: seven

Location: Fort Worth, Texas

Stadium: Amon Carter Stadium (45,000; grass)

Last league title: 2011 (MWC)

Schedule: [view]

Roster: [view]

2011 statistics: [view]

The Good
The starting quarterback returns. So does four of the top five rushers from 2011 as well as the top four in receiving yardage. In other words, an offense that finished in the top 10 in scoring is loaded once again, which is a good thing as the Horned Frogs will be spending its first season in the offensive-leaning Big 12.

The Bad
Inexplicably, a TCU defense that hadn’t finished outside the top 10 in points allowed since 2005 plummeted to 28th in that category in 2011. While TCU returns seven starters from that unit, the Horned Frogs did lose two top linebackers whose departures will make an impact. Heading into the Big 12, the last thing the Horned Frogs need is issues on the defensive side of the ball, although 2011 could very well be considered an aberration given Patterson’s defensive track record at the school. The defense isn’t the only concern, either, as TCU must also replace three starting offensive linemen.

The Unknown
As is the case with West Virginia, Missouri, Texas A&M and others, TCU will be adjusting to a newer — and more rugged — conference home this season. How quickly the Horned Frogs  adapt to their new surroundings will go a long way in determining how much — or how little — success they will have in their inaugural campaign in the Big 12.  As TCU will be moving to its fifth different conference since 1995, we’re guessing that they have this league-swapping down to a science.

Make-or-break game: at Texas, Nov. 22
What better way to enter a new conference than to knock off the state’s bell-cow football program on Thanksgiving Day?  Certainly games against the likes of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State and Texas Tech are important, but putting a Longhorns notch in the belt as TCU attempts to get a foothold in its new league would do wonders for the Horned Frogs.  Especially if TCU can help spoil what’s projected to be a rebound season for the ‘Horns.

Heisman hopeful: quarterback Casey Pachall
Andy who? In his first year as the replacement for Andy Dalton, all Pachall did was throw for nearly 3,000 yards and totaled 27 touchdowns — 25 passing, two rushing — in leading the Horned Frogs to an 11-win season.  Given the amount of skill players that are returning, Pachall should be in line for a statistical improvement in 2012, which should vastly improve the odds of the junior being mentioned on at least the periphery of the Heisman discussion. Provided he can test clean, of course.

Return to CFT’s preseason Top 25

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Bovada likes Alabama to beat Georgia, but Oklahoma has odds in their favor

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Alabama has long been considered the favorite to win the national championship in college football according to Bovada this season, and that is not exactly changing with the College Football Playoff here. But if the Crimson Tide get paired up with Oklahoma, Alabama could be playing the role of underdog.

The latest odds released for each possible College Football Playoff national championship scenario have been updated by Bovada, and they continue to bode well for Alabama if they end up facing Georgia in Atlanta. Alabama is a 7/2 favorite against Georgia, while Georgia has been given 25/4 odds to beat the Crimson Tide. Georgia also has 13/2 odds against Clemson, while the Tigers have been given 4/1 odds against the Bulldogs.

The odds continue to bode well for Baker Mayfield and Oklahoma, however. The Sooners have been given 6/1 odds against Alabama and 7/1 odds against Clemson should Oklahoma get by Georgia in the Rose Bowl semifinal to play for their first College Football Playoff national championship.

Here are the different odds for the College Football Playoff national championship as updated by Bovada on Monday morning;

  • Alabama over Georgia – 7/2
  • Alabama over Oklahoma – 4/1
  • Clemson over Georgia – 4/1
  • Clemson over Oklahoma – 6/1
  • Georgia over Alabama – 25/4
  • Georgia over Clemson – 13/2
  • Oklahoma over Alabama 6/1
  • Oklahoma over Clemson – 7/1

Which bet do you like the most?

Crunch time for Temple’s on-campus stadium plans approaching quickly

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For about as long as anyone can probably remember at this point, Temple has been flirting with the idea of building an on-campus football stadium to serve as the home of the Owls. With the current lease agreement to play games in Lincoln Financial Field now set to expire at the end of the 2019 season, the idea of building an on-campus stadium has reached a point where it may be now or never.

According to a report from The Philadelphia Inquirer, Temple is expected to provide an update on the potential plans for an on-campus stadium during a board of trustees meeting on Tuesday. With the construction of a possible 35,000-seat stadium structure expected to take between 18 and 24 months, time is beginning to be more of a factor moving forward. If plans for an on-campus stadium fail to move forward soon, then Temple must work with the Philadelphia Eagles to secure Lincoln Financial Field as a site for home games. According to a previous report from Philly Voice, the Eagles had been asking for a 30-year lease at $2 million per year and $12 million upfront. Temple has been paying $1 million per year for use of the NFL stadium and has called it home since the building opened in 2003. The original lease was a 15-year agreement with two options to tack on two additional seasons.

Temple’s on-campus football stadium has lacked the support from the Temple community and the surrounding neighborhood the stadium would potentially be constructed, making this a decision that does not come easily for the Owls and the university. Despite some recent good seasons out of the Temple football program, the Owls historically have not fared well with packing stadiums for games. Unless Temple is hosting Penn State or Notre Dame, Temple has struggled to be a draw that brings in many fans. The thought is having an on-campus stadium may make it more accessible for the Temple community for less-marquee games, but that is not a fail-proof strategy at this time for Temple either.

Temple’s issues with an on-campus stadium are not unique to the Owls. Even Miami has similar issues with playing home games in an NFL stadium off campus. Despite a strong season of football, Miami took a while to fill the seats until they were playing Notre Dame in November. But Miami has many advantages that Temple does not. And simply having an on-campus stadium does not immediately translate into national success. South Florida plays in an NFL stadium and they have fared well the past few years. Cincinnati has an on-campus stadium, yet they have continued to struggle. Regardless of where the team plays, it all comes down to simply having the best combination of staff and players. Having the best facilities possible is a big factor in recruiting both.

An on-campus stadium for Temple has its perks, but it is not a perfect plan according to those with concerns in the community. We’ll see if anything comes out of this latest board meeting, if the stadium idea remains on the agenda.

Oregon strikes big money deal to retain Jim Leavitt as defensive coordinator

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Oregon may have dropped the first game of the Mario Cristobal era on Saturday, but the Ducks came out of the weekend with reason to feel energized about the future of the program. According to a report from Bruce Feldman of Sports Illustrated, Oregon has reached a deal with defensive coordinator Jim Leavitt to keep him on the staff through the 2021 season.

As reported by Feldman, Leavitt will be paid $1.7 million per year for the next four seasons, making him one of the highest-paid coordinators in the country. LSU defensive coordinator Dave Aranda is paid $1.8 million and Clemson defensive coordinator Brent Venables is paid $1.7 million according to a record of coaching salaries compiled by USA Today. Leavitt had been the 12th highest-paid coordinator in college football prior to this significant bump in pay to make him the third highest-paid coordinator in the country.

Keeping Leavitt in Eugene is a big win for Cristobal as he takes over the job as head coach. Leavitt had been expected to be a target of former Oregon head coach Willie Taggart as he assembles his new staff at Florida State. Leavitt had been discussed as a potential target for other jobs as well, with one report suggesting he may have been sought after as a replacement for Bill Snyder at Kansas State.

Leavitt played a big role in turning the Oregon defense around in just one season. Inheriting a defense that ranked 115th in the nation in 2016, Leavitt transformed the Ducks into the 32nd-best defense in the country this season.

Pitt landing another ex-USC QB as a transfer

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Max Browne made the move from USC to Pitt work.  Ricky Town could be hoping for some of the same transferring magic.

Town’s private quarterback coach confirmed to 247Sports.com that Town has committed to continuing his FBS playing career at Pitt.  The move to the Panthers comes after Town took a visit to the football program this past weekend.

“This is the perfect system for him,” Town’s tutor, Donovan Dooley, told the recruiting website. “I think the pro-style system is good for him.”

Originally a USC signee, Town announced in mid-August of 2015 that he would be transferring from the Trojans. Less than a week later, after considering Florida as well, Town landed at Arkansas.  In December of 2016, Town transferred from the Razorbacks as well.

Town spent the 2017 season at a California junior college, which would allow him to play immediately for a Panthers program that has already lost two quarterbacks to transfer in the last week.  The California native has two years of eligibility remaining.

Town was a four-star member of the Trojans’ 2015 recruiting class, rated as the No. 6 pro-style quarterback in the country; the No. 15 player at any position in the state of California; and the No. 79 player overall on 247Sports.com‘s composite board.  In January of 2014, Town pulled his verbal commitment from Alabama and gave it to USC.