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Team doctor: Tulane DB did not have collapsed lung, tracheotomy

Tulane Player Hurt Football AP

The multiple Top 25 upsets during Saturday’s round of college football became a secondary story to a sobering incident in Tulsa, OK, when Tulane safety Devon Walker sustained a hit that left him motionless on TU’s H.A. Chapman Stadium.

Initial reports out of Tulsa claimed that Walker suffered a broken neck and collapsed lung during the impact. Additionally, it was reported that Walker had to be revived on the field and a tracheotomy was performed.

According to team doctor Greg Stewart, those reports are untrue. Here’s what the doctor said Saturday evening via the New Orleans Times-Picayune:

“He did not drop a lung. Was there CPR done? Did we do chest compressions? Yes. But it was one of those things where once we got him hooked up to the monitor, his blood pressure was low so it was hard to feel the blood pressure and we didn’t have anything – he wasn’t hooked up to an EKG, wasn’t hooked up to an AED. When we first got out there and were dealing with him, we didn’t have any equipment so it’s all about what you can feel through sweat and gloves and all that kind of stuff. So, yes we did (do CPR) because we figured we would rather err on the side on doing compressions when we didn’t need to as opposed to not doing them and wishing we had.”

Stewart said Walker is in stable condition in a Tulsa hospital and is in traction — immobilized as doctors treat the swelling in his neck and prepare him for surgery in the upcoming days. 

Stewart also said Walker had some feeling in his arms and legs but the next 24 to 48 hours will give doctors a better idea of whether he will be paralyzed. 

Still, it’s wonderful news to hear that Walker is in stable condition. Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with Walker, his family and friends, as well as the entire Tulane community.

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14 Responses to “Team doctor: Tulane DB did not have collapsed lung, tracheotomy”
  1. woebegong says: Sep 9, 2012 11:50 AM

    I hope that young man recovers and continues his career. That was a scary moments, made more so, by the media reporting the game, doing their usual guessing and maybe making matters worse for the fans of that young man actually watching the game.

  2. bluefunk72 says: Sep 9, 2012 12:10 PM

    Football is secondary right now! Lets just hope that he will be able to walk and live a normal life.

  3. tigersgeaux says: Sep 9, 2012 12:13 PM

    I have never heard of a trache being done as a precautionary measure, but I understand if the medic and personnel felt they had to err on the side of caution. I am sure glad they were there with the knowledge and expertise as well as the boldness to act so quickly.

    My prayers continue to go forth for this fine young man from Destrehan, LA. His family is with him now in Tulsa. He was a high school scholar student and is a true student/scholar-athlete.

    woebegong: You are quite correct, his fans and HIS FAMILY were watching the game…my God. They panicked and thought…well you know what they thought, what the media conjectured, just as you posted.

  4. brianratm says: Sep 9, 2012 12:19 PM

    Did I miss something? Where in the team’s doctor’s quotes did he say that a trach was not performed. Even if he did not have a collapsed lung, clearly, he was having trouble breathing or they would not have performed CPR. Doing a trach would just ensure he got oxygen more easily. I wish the young man nothing but the best. I also wish the authors of this site would either show full quotes or not make statements concerning quotes if they are simply not true

  5. eleventyeight says: Sep 9, 2012 12:34 PM

    Grammar, syntax and sentence structure are lost on every “journalist” past 40 years old. Most can neither spell nor punctuate properly. And they all fail to understand the difference between paraphrasing or quoting.

    Worst of all is the they ALL write in the vernacular instead of formal voice of the language.

    It is pathetic that a third-grader from the mid-1970′s could do all of these things correctly while “trained professionals” are lost on the issue.

    Most importantly- I have been and will continue to keep this poor young man and his family in my thoughts and prayers. I’ve had his injury, and no decent soul would wish it on any mother’s son. God bless him and his family and pray they’re all strong enough for what’s ahead.

    I pray he achieves a full recovery, and for the poor teammate who will have to bear the burden of this in soul his whole life even though it was clearly an accident.

    So very saddening.

  6. wethog66 says: Sep 9, 2012 12:55 PM

    Great to read medical staff on scene had their **** together to help this kid in a serious time of need. And God speed to Walker in his recovery. I hope he makes a full recovery and he will be in my prayers.

  7. Ben Kercheval says: Sep 9, 2012 12:58 PM

    “Did I miss something? Where in the team’s doctor’s quotes did he say that a trach was not performed.”

    It says it in the article from NOTP. The CPR was a precaution.

  8. larrybrown43 says: Sep 9, 2012 1:50 PM

    Eleventyeight:

    You’re a genius and we are blessed to be in your presence.

    I’d rather have the info quickly, especially with this story, than anything else.

    These guys spew story after story seven days a week. Often times working 12+ hour days.

    It’s an information site. Not the NYT.

  9. brutusbuckeye2011 says: Sep 9, 2012 1:53 PM

    What kind of person would give a thumbs down on the comments wishing the Tulane player well?

  10. Deb says: Sep 9, 2012 2:47 PM

    Continuing to pray for this young man, his family, and his coaches and teammates. May God be with him and those who tend to him as he recovers from his injuries, and with all players as the season continues.

  11. florida727 says: Sep 10, 2012 7:30 AM

    eleventyeight says:
    Sep 9, 2012 12:34 PM
    Grammar, syntax and sentence structure are lost on every “journalist” past 40 years old. Most can neither spell nor punctuate properly. And they all fail to understand the difference between paraphrasing or quoting.

    —————————————————–

    As “larry brown43″ correctly points out, if you’re looking for perfection in all things grammatical, go find a New York Times. Besides, even YOUR post is wrong. It’s the journalists PAST 40 years old, NOT the newbies coming out of college, that have no trouble with grammar, syntax and sentence structure.

    Keep the focus on what’s important here: a young man’s life and future hanging in the balance, not whether an adjective or an adverb was in its proper place (according to you).

  12. tlmoon2112 says: Sep 10, 2012 8:35 AM

    brutusbuckeye2011 says:
    Sep 9, 2012 1:53 PM
    What kind of person would give a thumbs down on the comments wishing the Tulane player well?

    Answer:
    An Alabama fan

  13. tlmoon2112 says: Sep 10, 2012 8:39 AM

    By the way, I couldnt agree with most of you more if I tried. Ive got this kid on my prayer list and I hope God brings him back to full strength and he is used for God’s glory. Who cares if he had a trache, didnt have a trache, blah blah blah….hes alive and stable. Clearly the doctors made good decisions to get him this far. They’re on my prayer list as well.

  14. blueinok says: Sep 10, 2012 1:42 PM

    I believe they are trying to set up a fund through the University of Tulsa to help this young man’s parents stay in Tulsa while he recovers. I will post when I find out more details (and make sure it is a legitmate fund). In the meanwhile of all Tulsa has this young man in their prayer’s.

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