Chris Petersen

Boise State survives ugly game over BYU


Following last season’s Las Vegas Bowl, I opined that what former Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore brought to the game of football — his intelligence, mostly — was going to be far more appreciated once he had moved on.

There was perhaps no better example of that loss in this young 2012 season than what happened Thursday night when No. 24 Boise State survived an ugly 7-6 win over BYU. It was bittersweet in a way. On one hand, it was the second time the Broncos have been held without an offensive touchdown this season (the other time being a 17-13 season-opening loss to No. 13 Michigan State). On the other, BSU defensive tackle Michael Atkinson intercepted a Riley Nelson pass and ran it 36 yards for a FAT GUY TOUCHDOWN!!! 

But Boise State’s offense, like BYU’s, was stagnant the entire evening. While each defense deserves credit there, it also goes to show just how much the Broncos lost on offense outside of Moore. Boise won the turnover battle 5-0 and could only convert one into points. There were mistakes all evening. Both teams had eight penalties for nearly identical yardage and neither had much success converting third downs. Boise’s kicking game is still lacking too. Broncos place kicker Michael Frisina missed a 33-yard field goal in the first quarter and never got another chance; Chris Petersen opted for five fourth-down attempts the rest of the game (of which he converted zero).

Incidentally, Boise won tonight’s game because BYU coach Bronco Mendenhall opted for the two-point conversion (which failed) after backup quarterback Taysom Hill ran in from the 4-yard line for a touchdown with under four minutes to play.

It was an overall defensive struggle, but the miscues were glaring. While trying to run down the clock, Broncos quarterback Joe Southwick snapped the ball on a second-and-10 with seven seconds still left on the play clock and completed a pass to Holden Huff, who went out-of-bounds. Boise got the first down on the play, and that about finished the game, but Petersen looked like he was going to lose his mind. Two plays later, Southwick called a timeout.

When the clock hit all zeroes, Petersen unhooked his headset and said one word that was recognizable by lip reading:


In Baker Mayfield, Texas set to face yet another QB who wanted to be a Longhorn

Baker Mayfield
Associated Press

Jameis WinstonJohnny ManzielAndrew LuckRobert Griffin IIIJ.T. Barrett. Oh, don’t mind me. Just recounting the number of quarterbacks with ties to the Texas football program that never received a sniff from Bevo’s famous snout.

Add another to the list, perhaps the most inexplicable of all: Baker Mayfield.

Mayfield played at Lake Travis High School in Austin, a powerhouse program in a state that specializes in them. Lightly recruited out of high school (he reportedly held only an offer from Florida Atlantic), Mayfield and his family reached out to the nearby program to see if they’d take him as a walk-on.

They said no.

“They told us he had five scholarship quarterbacks, so there wasn’t any need of ‘Bake’ coming out there,” James Mayfield, Baker’s father, told George Schroeder of USA Today. “I popped off that they had five scholarship quarterbacks that couldn’t even play for Lake Travis. That’s where our relationship stalled out.”

On one hand, it utterly boggles the mind why Texas would decline a successful high school quarterback willing to pay his own way on to the team, especially considering the state of the position at the time. On the other, one would see why Mack Brown‘s staff would pass on a kid with only an offer from FAU who says UT’s quarterbacks couldn’t start for his high school team.

Instead, Texas signed Tyrone Swoopes and Mayfield enrolled at Texas Tech. He won the starting job as a true freshman, transferred to Oklahoma, walked on and then won the starting job there.

And now he’s set to face the hometown team he at one time wished he could play for.

Mayfield has completed 88-of-135 throws for 1,382 yards with 13 touchdowns and three interceptions – good for a 178.52 passer rating, which ranks fifth nationally – while adding 138 yards and four scores on the ground. His counterpart, redshirt freshman Jerrod Heard, has connected on 42-of-76 passes for 661 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions (131.74 passer rating) to go with a team-leading 67 carries for 318 yards and three touchdowns.

“As perverse as all this has been, he’s where he wanted to be,” James Mayfield said. “He’s living his dream. If he had to do it all over again, he’d do it, with the same outcome.”

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press

One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”

Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”