Kelcey Quarles

Punishment for punch of LSU player up to Gamecocks


Whether South Carolina has a starting member of its defensive line for all/part/none of its key SEC East game against Florida this Saturday will be up to the football program — provided the conference concurs.

Early in the Gamecocks’ loss to LSU, defensive tackle Kelcey Quarles (pictured, No. 99) was caught by the magic of cameras that litter live televised sporting events punching Tigers offensive lineman P.J. Lonergan in the facemask after the two had tussled during a first-quarter play.  While we can’t post the clip here, you can view it by clicking HERE.

The SEC, which has already suspended two players this season for “flagrant and dangerous acts,” said Tuesday that any punishment Quarles will be facing won’t come from the conference as the decision on punitive measures is being left up to the school. Charles Bloom, SEC spokesperson, did tell Brett McMurphy of that any punishment that is — or isn’t — meted out by head coach Steve Spurrier is subject to league approval.

Neither Spurrier nor the school have addressed the situation, although the Ol’ Ball Coach will next speak to the media Wednesday on the weekly SEC coaches’ teleconference.

As for why something such as a punch is not within the SEC’s purview, Bloom said in a statement that the NCAA has mandated conferences take a hands-on approach to illegal/dangerous hits while they leave other issues, at least initially, to the discretion of the individual schools:

“The SEC has been diligent in reviewing plays that by rule involve the initiation of contact and targeting defenseless opponents to the head and neck area. The conference maintains constant communication with head coaches on matters of penalty violations during the season. In the first instance discipline for violations involving non-NCAA-required automatic conference review are to be handled by the institution subject to the approval of the league office.”

Based on the video evidence, and especially given the stakes involved this weekend, we’re guessing nothing more than a slap on the wrist at worst is in the offing for Quarles from the school — subject to the approval of the league office, of course.

Should the unexpected happen and Quarles is held out of the game, though, the Gamecocks would be missing a player who is second on the team in tackles for loss (six), fourth in sacks (2.5) and sixth in tackles (30).

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press
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One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”

Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”

Wisconsin announces 10-year agreement with Under Armour

Joel Stave
Associated Press

What has long been rumored became fact Friday, as Wisconsin announced a 10-year agreement with Under Armour.

“I am absolutely thrilled about our new partnership with Under Armour,” AD Barry Alvarez said in a statement. “Kevin Plank and his team have established a brand that fits perfectly with the Wisconsin athletics story and culture. Our primary focus at Wisconsin is, of course, our student-athletes, and Under Armour’s passion and commitment to high quality and innovation will benefit our student-athletes for years to come. Our entire department is looking forward to a long and mutually productive relationship with the Under Armour team.”

The new deal will pay the Badgers a total of $7 million in cash and product in 2015-16 and is valued at $96 million over the life of the contract, good for second in the Big Ten, trailing only Nike’s new contract with Michigan.

Hidden within the contract are two nuggets that UA offered to sway the Badgers away from Adidas, from the Portland Business Journal:

Wisconsin will get as much as $500,000 from Under Armour to “rebrand” athletic facilities. It’ll get $150,000 to build out an Under Armour retail space in a campus gift shop called Bucky’s Locker Room. It also gets two summer internships for students at Under Armour’s Baltimore headquarters.

“The University of Wisconsin is an institution built on the highest values of academic excellence, and we are extremely proud to be teaming up with one of the most vibrant, distinctive and successful athletic programs in the country to help elevate the performance of all Badgers with innovative footwear and apparel,” added Plank.

Wisconsin’s departure continues to weaken the stronghold Adidas had built in the Midwest after losing Michigan to Nike and Notre Dame to Under Armour in recent years (the company still owns apparel rights for Indiana and Nebraska). The Badgers are now the 41st Division I athletics department and 17th FBS program to join UA.