Big 12 Media Day

Seventh access bowl now less likely, report says


As of last month, college football’s head honchos were considering adding a seventh access bowl to the playoff mix, which was later reported to include representatives from the “best of the rest” and either the Big 12 or Pac-12.

Now, it appears that idea was simply fun while it lasted. Brett McMurphy of ESPN reports that the seventh “access bowl” has a “less than 50 percent” chance of happening. From McMurphy:

However, this is becoming more unlikely because of a myriad of concerns and obstacles involved for a seventh access bowl. Among them: The bowl’s lesser worth compared to the other access bowls, the difficulty of selling tickets for an annual bowl featuring a non-power conference team and finding a bowl that wants to host the game that also meets the stadium capacity requirements for an access bowl and the national semifinals, sources said.

The report states that the seventh bowl would be worth about $25 million a year. Compare that to the Rose and Champions Bowl ($80 million) and the Orange Bowl ($60 million).

The six playoff sites that would also act as rotating semifinal sites for a college football playoff have not been officially established, but it’s believed that they would include the four current BCS bowls — Fiesta, Orange, Rose and Sugar — plus the Cotton Bowl in Dallas and the Chick-fil-A Bowl in Atlanta. The Rose, Champions (site is still TBD, but it could be in either the Cotton or Sugar) and Orange Bowl all have their contractual tie-ins established or in the final stages of negotiations.

Whatever spaces are open among the three remaining high-revenue bowls will likely be filled with at-large opponents, the requirements for which are still TBD. So, if you’re what is currently considered a non-AQ conference, your chances of getting invited to a high-revenue bowl just took a serious hit unless one of the available at-large spots becomes guaranteed for smaller conferences. In other words, the new postseason isn’t fair for everyone (and that’s okay)  — unless you’re part of the privileged group, in which case it’s extremely fair (and that’s not okay).

The four-team playoff idea is still one with which I agree, but the six “access bowls” that make up the rotating semifinal sites have become a cluster-you-know-what of the highest order all in the name of keeping some semblance of a tradition that got watered down when someone, clearly drunk, decided “Yeah, putting a bowl game in Boise freaking Idaho in the middle of December is a good idea.”

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press
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One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”

Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”

Wisconsin announces 10-year agreement with Under Armour

Joel Stave
Associated Press

What has long been rumored became fact Friday, as Wisconsin announced a 10-year agreement with Under Armour.

“I am absolutely thrilled about our new partnership with Under Armour,” AD Barry Alvarez said in a statement. “Kevin Plank and his team have established a brand that fits perfectly with the Wisconsin athletics story and culture. Our primary focus at Wisconsin is, of course, our student-athletes, and Under Armour’s passion and commitment to high quality and innovation will benefit our student-athletes for years to come. Our entire department is looking forward to a long and mutually productive relationship with the Under Armour team.”

The new deal will pay the Badgers a total of $7 million in cash and product in 2015-16 and is valued at $96 million over the life of the contract, good for second in the Big Ten, trailing only Nike’s new contract with Michigan.

Hidden within the contract are two nuggets that UA offered to sway the Badgers away from Adidas, from the Portland Business Journal:

Wisconsin will get as much as $500,000 from Under Armour to “rebrand” athletic facilities. It’ll get $150,000 to build out an Under Armour retail space in a campus gift shop called Bucky’s Locker Room. It also gets two summer internships for students at Under Armour’s Baltimore headquarters.

“The University of Wisconsin is an institution built on the highest values of academic excellence, and we are extremely proud to be teaming up with one of the most vibrant, distinctive and successful athletic programs in the country to help elevate the performance of all Badgers with innovative footwear and apparel,” added Plank.

Wisconsin’s departure continues to weaken the stronghold Adidas had built in the Midwest after losing Michigan to Nike and Notre Dame to Under Armour in recent years (the company still owns apparel rights for Indiana and Nebraska). The Badgers are now the 41st Division I athletics department and 17th FBS program to join UA.