Jeff Tedford

Tedford officially out as Cal’s coach


Rumored to be on his way out as Cal’s head coach leading into this past weekend, it appeared Jeff Tedford was set to receive at least a one-year reprieve after a reported meeting with his athletic director Sunday didn’t result in an immediate dismissal.

As it turns out, that was merely delaying what has long been considered the inevitable.

In a release, Cal announced Tuesday afternoon that Tedford will not serve as its head football coach moving forward.  Tedford informed his players of the athletic department’s decision at a 1 p.m. ET meeting.

Tedford becomes the sixth FBS head coach to either retire or have been fired in the past month.

“For many years, under Jeff Tedford’s leadership, our program represented all that and more,” athletic director Sandy Barbour said in a statement. “Coach Tedford deserves credit for the extraordinary effort he undertook to turn this program around and bring us to the heights of a Pac-10 co-championship in 2006. He has served his University admirably, and I will forever be indebted for his commitment and expertise, as well as the positive impact he has made in so many young men’s lives over the years.”

Tedford, who will be owed a $6.9 million buyout paid over three years and minus and collegiate/NFL coaching salary, finishes his 11-year Golden Bears career with a respectable 82-57 record, although the past few years have seen Cal’s on-field performance drop precipitously.

Since leading Cal to a 28-9 record from 2004-06, Tedford has gone just 39-37 in the subsequent six seasons.  The last three, the record has tumbled to 15-22, including a 3-9 mark this season that’s easily the worst of Tedford’s 11 seasons at Cal.

Even more distressing for the alumni and fan base is how far the Bears have lagged behind their bitter rivals.  As Cal has struggled mightily the past three years, Stanford has gone 31-5 and turned the Big Game into the Big Rout — the Cardinal has won the last three by an average of 18 points per game.

For a university that just took on hundreds of millions of dollars in debt renovating the football stadium, that level of performance on all fronts is far from acceptable, even for a coach who resurrected the program from the ashes just a decade ago.

“This was an extraordinarily difficult decision, one that required a thorough and thoughtful analysis of a complex set of factors,” Barbour said. “Ultimately, I believed that we needed a change in direction to get our program back on the right track. Cal football is integral to our department and our university, and its influence can be felt well beyond the walls of Memorial Stadium. The program clearly serves as an important part of the connective tissue that binds our community together, and it is imperative that Cal football be recognized as a leader in competitive success, academic achievement and community engagement.”

The early names being bandied about as potential replacements?  Louisiana Tech head coach Sonny Dykes and Fresno State head coach Tim DeRuyter, along with former Stanford assistant and current San Francisco 49ers offensive coordinator Greg Roman.

In Baker Mayfield, Texas set to face yet another QB who wanted to be a Longhorn

Baker Mayfield
Associated Press

Jameis WinstonJohnny ManzielAndrew LuckRobert Griffin IIIJ.T. Barrett. Oh, don’t mind me. Just recounting the number of quarterbacks with ties to the Texas football program that never received a sniff from Bevo’s famous snout.

Add another to the list, perhaps the most inexplicable of all: Baker Mayfield.

Mayfield played at Lake Travis High School in Austin, a powerhouse program in a state that specializes in them. Lightly recruited out of high school (he reportedly held only an offer from Florida Atlantic), Mayfield and his family reached out to the nearby program to see if they’d take him as a walk-on.

They said no.

“They told us he had five scholarship quarterbacks, so there wasn’t any need of ‘Bake’ coming out there,” James Mayfield, Baker’s father, told George Schroeder of USA Today. “I popped off that they had five scholarship quarterbacks that couldn’t even play for Lake Travis. That’s where our relationship stalled out.”

On one hand, it utterly boggles the mind why Texas would decline a successful high school quarterback willing to pay his own way on to the team, especially considering the state of the position at the time. On the other, one would see why Mack Brown‘s staff would pass on a kid with only an offer from FAU who says UT’s quarterbacks couldn’t start for his high school team.

Instead, Texas signed Tyrone Swoopes and Mayfield enrolled at Texas Tech. He won the starting job as a true freshman, transferred to Oklahoma, walked on and then won the starting job there.

And now he’s set to face the hometown team he at one time wished he could play for.

Mayfield has completed 88-of-135 throws for 1,382 yards with 13 touchdowns and three interceptions – good for a 178.52 passer rating, which ranks fifth nationally – while adding 138 yards and four scores on the ground. His counterpart, redshirt freshman Jerrod Heard, has connected on 42-of-76 passes for 661 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions (131.74 passer rating) to go with a team-leading 67 carries for 318 yards and three touchdowns.

“As perverse as all this has been, he’s where he wanted to be,” James Mayfield said. “He’s living his dream. If he had to do it all over again, he’d do it, with the same outcome.”

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press

One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”

Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”