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Record number of underclassmen enter NFL draft

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We’ve been keeping track of underclassmen who have declared for this year’s NFL draft. This morning, the NFL released its list of 73 underclassmen who have been granted “special eligibility” for the draft by being at least three years removed from high school before declaring.

That number is a new record, breaking the one held in 2012 with 65 underclassmen declaring. In 2011, 56 players left early and 53 took off in 2010. In fact, the 73 who declared this year is 30 more than in 2004.

Of the 73 players, 33 come from SEC schools, or began their careers at SEC schools. That’s far and away the most of any conference. LSU has 11 underclassmen with ties to the program represented.

You can view the NFL’s release HEREbut here’s the alphabetized list.

Keenan Allen WR, California
David Amerson DB, North Carolina State
Alvin Bailey G, Arkansas
Stedman Bailey WR, West Virginia
David Bakhtiari T, Colorado
Dwayne Beckford LB, Purdue
Le’Veon Bell RB, Michigan State
Giovani Bernard RB, North Carolina
Tyler Bray QB,Tennessee
Terrence Brown DB, Stanford
Duron Carter WR, Ohio State
Knile Davis RB, Arkansas
Mike Edwards DB, Hawaii
Matt Elam DB, Florida
Zach Ertz TE, Stanford
Gavin Escobar TE, San Diego State
Chris Faulk T, Louisiana State
Sharrif Floyd DT, Florida
Michael Ford RB, Louisiana State
Travis Frederick C, Wisconsin
Kwame Geathers NT, Georgia
William Gholston DE, Michigan State
Johnathan Hankins DT, Ohio State
Jajuan Harley DB, Middle Tennessee
DeAndre HopkinsWR, Clemson
Justin Hunter WR, Tennessee
Jawan Jamison RB, Rutgers
Stefphon Jefferson RB, Nevada
Tony Jefferson DB, Oklahoma
Jelani Jenkins LB, Florida
Luke Joeckel T, Texas A&M
Jarvis Jones LB, Georgia
Jose Jose DT, Central Florida
Joe Kruger DE, Utah
Eddie Lacy RB, Alabama
Marcus Lattimore RB, South Carolina
Corey Lemonier DE, Auburn
Bennie Logan DT, Louisiana State
Stansly Maponga DE, Texas Christian
Tyrann Mathieu DB, Louisiana State
Dee Milliner DB, Alabama
Barkevious Mingo DE, Louisiana State
Kevin Minter LB, Louisiana State
Sam Montgomery DE, Louisiana State
Brandon Moore DT, Texas
Damontre Moore DE, Texas A&M
Alec Ogletree LB, Georgia
Cordarrelle Patterson WR, Tennessee
Bradley Randle RB, Nevada-Las Vegas
Joseph Randle RB, Oklahoma State
Jordan Reed TE, Florida
Eric Reid DB, Louisiana State
Greg Reid DB, Florida State
Xavier Rhodes DB, Florida State
Sheldon Richardson DT, Missouri
Nickell Robey DB, Southern California
Logan Ryan DB, Rutgers
Ace Sanders WR, South Carolina
Darrington Sentimore DT, Tennessee
Tharold Simon DB, Louisiana State
Dion Sims TE, Michigan State
Akeem Spence DT, Illinois
Kenny Stills WR, Oklahoma
Levine Toilolo TE, Stanford
Spencer Ware RB, Louisiana State
Menelik Watson T, Florida State
Bjoern Werner DE, Florida State
Steve Williams DB, California
Marquess Wilson WR, Washington State
Brad Wing P, Louisiana State
Cierre Wood RB, Notre Dame
Robert Woods WR, Southern California
Tom Wort LB, Oklahoma

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15 Responses to “Record number of underclassmen enter NFL draft”
  1. florida727 says: Jan 19, 2013 11:24 AM

    It’ll be interesting to see how many of these 73 actually get drafted. Personally, I think the people advising these kids are idiots for the most part. I know there are exceptions, but for every one of these kids that actually makes it in the NFL, there will be 10 that should have stayed in school and gotten their degree.

  2. effjohntaylornorelation says: Jan 19, 2013 11:28 AM

    Please don’t associate Duron “Dummy” Carter with tOSU. He flunked out.

  3. Ben Kercheval says: Jan 19, 2013 11:41 AM

    Please don’t associate Duron “Dummy” Carter with tOSU. He flunked out.

    ——-

    We’re not trying to associate anybody with any program. This is the NFL’s list.

  4. pdcooper08 says: Jan 19, 2013 12:49 PM

    I guess the carter kid gets listed to OSU because way back when, when he came from HS he was eligible to participate. What did this loser get in, one season? Why does he think anyone is going to be willing to take a chance on him. His character is crap. I hope he isn’t drafted. What a total waist

  5. bertenheim says: Jan 19, 2013 1:07 PM

    Most of these guys know they’re going to make it in the NFL (regardless of the NFL’s advisory staff).
    And few of these guys ever considered getting a degree when they enrolled. (Granted, there are hard-ship cases.)

  6. mungman69 says: Jan 19, 2013 1:21 PM

    If they can make a NFL roster they should come out. Running backs especially should leave early. However quarterbacks should stay and mature in college as long as they can.

  7. jack3dsd says: Jan 19, 2013 2:13 PM

    its more money than you get from graduating and getting a regular job with ot without the rookie wage scale so its a no brainer to leave early

  8. bulldog12b says: Jan 19, 2013 3:41 PM

    @mungman69- Tell that to Matt Barkley of USC… he would have been a top 5 pick last year… with his extra year of “maturity” he’s going to slip to the bottom of the 1st round if not the 2nd. Staying at USC cost him millions.

  9. pdcooper08 says: Jan 19, 2013 4:40 PM

    If Matt Barkley is going to be a legit player in the league, then he will make that up anyway. You can’t take away his degree or the masters he has worked on. If he bombs out, he’s now prepared to enter the real world and get a job. As far as the others go, if your not guaranteed being a Ist rounder, then u should stay. At the least, your two more semisters closer to graduating. A small minority of these players will be around after 3 years anyways. Three years of NFL contracts isn’t enough to raise a family for the next 25 to 30 years. Think about the future, not just what their telling you today.

  10. steeler1nation says: Jan 19, 2013 8:54 PM

    It’s the economy, stupid.
    #oBUManomics

  11. pdcooper08 says: Jan 19, 2013 9:03 PM

    Go get a job once your dreams over. With no degree. Good luck in this economy stupid.

  12. pricecube says: Jan 20, 2013 1:55 PM

    @pdcooper08

    I see this a little differently. The median salary in the U.S. is now only 26k a yr… The minimum salary in the NFL is about 400k a yr. Three yrs in the NFL would equal total earnings of about 1.2 M. It would take someone making 26k a yr over 46 yrs to make 1.2M. The average starting salary for a college grad is 44k a yr. Only a small percentage of kids coming out of school right now are finding work in their area of study immediately. Many move back in with their folks. Even if you find a job in your field earning 44k a yr would still require 27 yrs of work to earn 1.2 million.

    I think this is a no-brainer… take a shot and try your luck in the NFL and have plenty of money to finish out a degree and then go to grad school…. better yet try coaching college football if you do not make it in the NFL. Position coaches at decent college programs earn much more than most doctors.

  13. pdcooper08 says: Jan 20, 2013 2:26 PM

    I guess everyone is assuming when you get this large amount of money for the one to three year period, that the individual will not spend any of it. What really happens is, they create new bills and save little to no of their money. I’d like to believe in college they learn how to budget manage and save their earning. The fact is they don’t. Their football players, worse they are sitting ducks for all the trolls out their digging in their pockets. A majority of these kids come from single family lifestyle and have no concepts regarding planning for their future or saving money for a later date. We are talking about one year of waiting. Staying in school in the long run, far out ways taking that one shot at maybe getting drafted. Theirs nothing for sure about this. The free education is guaranteed. And if the NCAA is willing to start upping what they give out to athletes, college is not such a bad place to be at during these times. All these guys would surely get a shot the following year. To many of these guys are already doing this. Leaving early, trying out and getting cut. Now go wait in the job lines and see if u even qualify for a median job. Doubt it. I’ve seen it way to many times and have friends that have been their and done that, and after their done, they still don’t have jack. Me, I’m going on 24 in my career, and one day will retire.

  14. pricecube says: Jan 20, 2013 3:12 PM

    53% of college graduates under 25 are unemployed or underemployed (baristas, waiters etc.). Only a handful of undergraduate degrees actually give you a good chance of landing a job (e.g. nursing). Furthermore 400k a yr is the *minimum* salary in the NFL! Do they need to be smart with their money? Of course. It is a lot easier to do when making 400k than 26k. If you are waiting tables there is nothing left after you pay taxes, bills and feed yourself. You do not even have the opportunity to be smart with your money because you have nothing left over. This is the reality for a lot kids coming out of schools with degrees today. I just do not think an undergrad is as valuable as you seem to think it is… especially if it is not in a field that is in demand… and very few are. You would be better off learning to be a plumber or something than getting a liberal arts degree IMO.

  15. pdcooper08 says: Jan 20, 2013 6:50 PM

    So if they don’t come out early, they won’t have a chance to play in the league the following year? So your saying a college degree means nothing anymore. Have you seen the list provided by ESPN that had numerous well know names on it from all the main sports? Several names where of guys that are hall of famers or guys that played several years. They are all broke and bankrupt. It doesn’t matter how much money you throw at the majority of these players, the bottom line is, they’ll be broke sooner then later and with no degree, so then they cant even go and get that bartender job. I don’t know. I got a simple degree even when I didn’t really care to. And I went out and got a simple county job with my PE degree and I’m paying my bills and raising my family.

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