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Big 12 likely to seek NCAA waiver to hold title game


One of the casualties of the departures of Colorado, Missouri and Texas A&M for other conferences was the loss of the Big 12 championship game.  At 10 members following the addition of TCU, the Big 12 falls short of the 12-team-minimum threshold the NCAA requires to conduct a league title game.

If Bob Bowlsby has his way about it, though, his conference will hold a title game sooner rather than later — and do so without raiding another conference to add to its membership roll.

Speaking to the Associated Press Wednesday, the Big 12 commissioner said his conference will likely seek a waiver from the NCAA to conduct a league title game despite having just 10 members.  In order to hold a championship game, NCAA bylaw (c) states that a conference must be “divided into two divisions (of six or more institutions each), each of which conducts round-robin, regular-season competition among the members of that division.”

Bowlsby points to the NCAA’s recent move to pare down its own rulebook as a reason to waive — or outright eliminate — the title-game requirements.

“At a time when lots of deregulation is taking place, it seems a little bit odd that the NCAA would be describing how we determine our champions,” Bowlsby told the AP.

“I think it’s reasonable to say if you’re going to have a champion that you’re going to have to designate it in one fashion or another. But to say it has to be between 12 schools or that there has to be divisional play or there has to be a round-robin, we’re deregulating lots of things and that certainly is a candidate.”

The Big 12 was the second major conference to conduct a championship game, joining the SEC (1992) back in 1996.  Now, it’s the only one of the Big Five — ACC, Big Ten, PAC-12 and SEC — that doesn’t, with the last being played following the 2010 season.

While it appears Bowlsby is speaking on this subject with the approval of a majority the Big 12’s chancellors and presidents, it remains to be seen how the views of one of the most powerful men in the conference have changed.

I don’t want a championship game,” Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds said back in September. “I think five years down the road, for those that have a championship game, those coaches are going to say, ‘Why are we doing this? Why do we have an extra game to get to the [four-team playoff]?'”

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press
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One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”

Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”

Wisconsin announces 10-year agreement with Under Armour

Joel Stave
Associated Press

What has long been rumored became fact Friday, as Wisconsin announced a 10-year agreement with Under Armour.

“I am absolutely thrilled about our new partnership with Under Armour,” AD Barry Alvarez said in a statement. “Kevin Plank and his team have established a brand that fits perfectly with the Wisconsin athletics story and culture. Our primary focus at Wisconsin is, of course, our student-athletes, and Under Armour’s passion and commitment to high quality and innovation will benefit our student-athletes for years to come. Our entire department is looking forward to a long and mutually productive relationship with the Under Armour team.”

The new deal will pay the Badgers a total of $7 million in cash and product in 2015-16 and is valued at $96 million over the life of the contract, good for second in the Big Ten, trailing only Nike’s new contract with Michigan.

Hidden within the contract are two nuggets that UA offered to sway the Badgers away from Adidas, from the Portland Business Journal:

Wisconsin will get as much as $500,000 from Under Armour to “rebrand” athletic facilities. It’ll get $150,000 to build out an Under Armour retail space in a campus gift shop called Bucky’s Locker Room. It also gets two summer internships for students at Under Armour’s Baltimore headquarters.

“The University of Wisconsin is an institution built on the highest values of academic excellence, and we are extremely proud to be teaming up with one of the most vibrant, distinctive and successful athletic programs in the country to help elevate the performance of all Badgers with innovative footwear and apparel,” added Plank.

Wisconsin’s departure continues to weaken the stronghold Adidas had built in the Midwest after losing Michigan to Nike and Notre Dame to Under Armour in recent years (the company still owns apparel rights for Indiana and Nebraska). The Badgers are now the 41st Division I athletics department and 17th FBS program to join UA.