Examining the ‘no visit’ policy in recruiting, and why it’s wrong

14 Comments

Recruiting has blossomed into a 365-day-a-year event, just like college football, the parent that spawned it. There’s more attention on 17 and 18-year-old high school kids now — and, sometimes, younger than that — than there’s ever been. To be a recruit, especially a blue-chip, in 2013 is filled with higher highs and lower lows. Rarely is there middle ground.

But it can be an exciting time for recruits. As our guy Michael Felder has pointed out on several occasions, it’s not until players reach the NFL — if they reach the pros at all — that they’ll have this much control again over their future.

Some coaches don’t believe a recruit should have that much control.

Mitch Sherman of ESPN’s RecrutingNation writes an intriguing and well-done piece about no-visit policies, which you can read HERE, where coaches tell recruits up front that if they’re committed to the program, the program is committed to them.

If they’re not, the school drops them.

The piece specifically mentions Texas, Michigan, Oregon and Georgia Tech as programs with no-visit policies. Yellow Jackets coach Paul Johnson has gained a certain level of notoriety for it.

The hypocrisy is astounding. Sure, a coach may be up front with a recruit about not visiting other programs, but the idea that commitment is a two-way street is a myth.

For one, a verbal commitment is non-binding by nature. To treat it as anything else is misguided, and frankly, kind of stupid. The word of a 17-year-old kid really doesn’t mean anything of significance. That’s not an indictment against Joe Recruit as much as it is a statement  about verbal commitments.

Secondly, and more obviously, coaches can do pretty much whatever the hell they want. Chip Kelly flirted with the NFL for the second year in a row and eventually left Oregon for the Philadelphia Eagles. Kelly had a better offer than Oregon, so he took it. Can you blame him? You shouldn’t. Likewise, a recruit has every right to explore another opportunity that he feels may be better for him without having to lose another opportunity.

Who knows, maybe the coach(es) that told the recruit he’s not allowed to visit other schools won’t be there when he steps foot on to campus. Notice the coaching carousel picked up again post-Signing Day?

Not every program does this obviously, and more often than not, you’re likely talking about a school that can get just about any player it wants every year. It’s also wise for a recruit not to “lock in” on a school or a coach and shut down their recruitment.

That still doesn’t make the no-visit policy right.

NCAA grants Houston LB Austin Robinson another season of eligibility

Getty Images
Leave a comment

As it turns out, Houston will have the services of Austin Robinson a little while longer than originally expected.

The football program announced Wednesday that the NCAA has granted Robinson a sixth season of eligibility. While the school wrote in its release that the linebacker “received a legislative relief waiver” from The Association, the specific reasoning behind the waiver being granted is unclear.

With the NCAA’s decision, Robinson will now have eligibility he can use in both 2018 and 2019.

Robinson began his collegiate career at UT-San Antonio in 2014, playing in eight games as a true freshman before transferring to UH and sitting out the 2015 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules. He then played in 11 games in 2016 and 12 this past season, starting four contests in 2017.

This past campaign, Robinson was credited with 33 tackles, four tackles for loss and a sack. He also had a pair of quarterback hurries on his statistical resume.

Minnesota losing CB Ken Handy-Holly to transfer

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Heading into spring practice, Minnesota will find its defensive secondary a bit thinner than it was when the curtain fell on the 2017 season.

A school spokesperson confirmed to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune that Ken Handy-Holly has been granted a release from his scholarship. 247Sports.com had previously reported that the safety was looking to transfer to be closer to family in Jackson, Ala.

A three-star member of the Gophers’ 2017 recruiting class, Handy-Holly was rated as the No. 38 safety in the country and the No. 28 player at any position in the state of Alabama. Only one signee in Minnesota’s class that year, offensive tackle Blaise Andries, was rated higher than Handy-Holly.

Because of injuries, Handy-Holly was pressed into action as a true freshman. He made his collegiate debut in a Sept. 30 loss to Maryland, and went on to play eight games total this past season.

In that action, Handy-Holly was credited with 12 tackles, a forced fumble and a fumble recovery.

Arkansas QB Cole Kelley pleads guilty to DWI

Getty Images
Leave a comment

An off-field situation for one playing member of the Arkansas football program that began during the 2017 regular season has taken yet another step toward winding its way to a conclusion.

According to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Cole Kelley pleaded guilty Wednesday to driving while intoxicated.  While the quarterback was sentenced to 90 days in jail, 89 of those days were suspended while he was given credit for time served for the other.  Additionally, the Democrat-Gazette wrote, the 20-year-old Kelley “was also ordered to complete an alcohol safety class and pay $720 in fines and court costs.”

Kelley was arrested for DWI and reckless driving in November of last year. A day after the arrest, Kelley was indefinitely suspended by the football program and missed UA’s Week 12 game; he was subsequently reinstated after serving what amounted to a one-game suspension.

Austin Allen started the first five games of the 2017 season before going down with a shoulder injury. Kelley replaced him and started the next four, with a healthy Allen returning to his starting role for the remainder of the year.

On the season, Kelley completed almost 58 percent of his 151 passes for 1,038 yards, eight touchdowns and four interceptions.  The rising redshirt sophomore is expected to compete for the starting job in 2018 under new head coach Chad Morris.

Report: Steve Spurrier Jr. leaving WKU for job at Wazzu

Getty Images
Leave a comment

With coaching holes throughout his Washington State staff to fill thanks to significant offseason poaching, Mike Leach has added a very famous college football surname.  Reportedly.

According to the Bowling Green Daily News, Steve Spurrier Jr. is leaving Western Kentucky to take a job under Leach at Wazzu.  The son of College Football Hall of Famer Steve Spurrier just completed his first season as the Hilltoppers’ quarterbacks coach.  He also held the title of assistant head coach under Mike Sanford.

It’s unclear what specific title Spurrier Jr. will hold at Wazzu.

Prior to his one season at WKU, and one season as an off-field staffer at Oklahoma, Spurrier Jr. had been an assistant on his father’s South Carolina staff for 11 seasons.  During his time with the Gamecocks, he served at various points as wide receivers coach (2005-15), passing-game coordinator (2009-11) and co-offensive coordinator (2012-15).

Spurrier Jr., who played wide receiver at Duke, has also spent time during his coaching career as receivers coach at Oklahoma (1999-2001) and with the Washington Redskins (2002-03).