Signing Day Alabama Football

Examining the ‘no visit’ policy in recruiting, and why it’s wrong


Recruiting has blossomed into a 365-day-a-year event, just like college football, the parent that spawned it. There’s more attention on 17 and 18-year-old high school kids now — and, sometimes, younger than that — than there’s ever been. To be a recruit, especially a blue-chip, in 2013 is filled with higher highs and lower lows. Rarely is there middle ground.

But it can be an exciting time for recruits. As our guy Michael Felder has pointed out on several occasions, it’s not until players reach the NFL — if they reach the pros at all — that they’ll have this much control again over their future.

Some coaches don’t believe a recruit should have that much control.

Mitch Sherman of ESPN’s RecrutingNation writes an intriguing and well-done piece about no-visit policies, which you can read HERE, where coaches tell recruits up front that if they’re committed to the program, the program is committed to them.

If they’re not, the school drops them.

The piece specifically mentions Texas, Michigan, Oregon and Georgia Tech as programs with no-visit policies. Yellow Jackets coach Paul Johnson has gained a certain level of notoriety for it.

The hypocrisy is astounding. Sure, a coach may be up front with a recruit about not visiting other programs, but the idea that commitment is a two-way street is a myth.

For one, a verbal commitment is non-binding by nature. To treat it as anything else is misguided, and frankly, kind of stupid. The word of a 17-year-old kid really doesn’t mean anything of significance. That’s not an indictment against Joe Recruit as much as it is a statement  about verbal commitments.

Secondly, and more obviously, coaches can do pretty much whatever the hell they want. Chip Kelly flirted with the NFL for the second year in a row and eventually left Oregon for the Philadelphia Eagles. Kelly had a better offer than Oregon, so he took it. Can you blame him? You shouldn’t. Likewise, a recruit has every right to explore another opportunity that he feels may be better for him without having to lose another opportunity.

Who knows, maybe the coach(es) that told the recruit he’s not allowed to visit other schools won’t be there when he steps foot on to campus. Notice the coaching carousel picked up again post-Signing Day?

Not every program does this obviously, and more often than not, you’re likely talking about a school that can get just about any player it wants every year. It’s also wise for a recruit not to “lock in” on a school or a coach and shut down their recruitment.

That still doesn’t make the no-visit policy right.

SEC shut out of AP top five for first time in half a decade

Stephen F. Austin visits Amon G. Carter Stadium to play the No. 3 TCU Horned Frogs.
AP Photo

The polls are meaningless. Especially any poll that isn’t the College Football Playoff top 25 and even then, as the TCU learned late last season, even the penultimate ranking is as meaningless as the paper they’re metaphorically written on.

Still, they’re catnip to college football fans and observers. Place them in front of us and we can’t help but gnaw on them.

And with that said, a bit of milestone was reached in Sunday’s Associated Press Top 25, as the SEC was completely shut out of the top five.

That group breaks down as follows:

  1. Ohio State
  2. TCU
  3. Baylor
  4. Michigan State
  5. Utah

An SEC free top five hasn’t happened in nearly five full years; October 10, 2010 was the last time such a thing occurred. Oddly enough, two of the same five culprits occupied that ranking as well:

  1. Ohio State
  2. Oregon
  3. Boise State
  4. TCU
  5. Nebraska

Underscoring the lesson of the first paragraph, eventual national champion Auburn checked in at No. 6. Those Tigers moved up a spot the following week and never looked back.

None of this means anything at all, until it does. But that doesn’t mean we can’t have some fun along the way.

Georgia loses ILB Reggie Carter for the season

Reggie Carter, Charone Peake
AP Photo
Leave a comment

After battling to get on the field throughout the season’s first five weeks, Georgia is shutting down inside linebacker Reggie Carter for the rest of the year, Dawgs head coach Mark Richt confirmed Sunday evening.

Carter fought shoulder problems throughout the year, and saw action in only one of Georgia’s first five games. A junior, Carter will be eligible for a medical redshirt.

The Snellville, Ga., native recorded 28 tackles in 12 appearances in 2014 and eight tackles in eight appearances as a freshman in 2013. UAB transfer Jake Ganus started in the spot many pegged to Carter before injure ruptured his season.

Carter totaled two stops in one appearance this season.