University Kidney Research Organization Gala

Pat Haden: schools should prepare for an O’Bannon victory


It’s no secret that the result of the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit against the NCAA could have far-reaching implications that dramatically change the way college athletics are operated.

While the NCAA and co-defendant EA Sports maintain their confidence that the O’Bannon plaintiffs will ultimately fall short of getting their desired results — they’re asking that current and former athletes receive 50 percent of the revenue generated by both the NCAA and conference television contracts — USC athletic director Pat Haden isn’t so sure.

Or, at the very least, he wants to prepare for the worst-case scenario.

“We ought to be kept abreast of it at all times, and we ought to prepare for it in case we lose,” Haden told Stewart Mandel of Sports Illustrated. “I haven’t followed the case closely, but what I read from legal scholars, it’s not a slam dunk for the NCAA.”

Haden continued:

“The context of the lawsuit has changed. What do we do if we lost?” Haden said. “All of a sudden your television revenue — let’s say it’s $20 million a year [for a school]. Now if they win, it’s $10 million a year. How do you make your 21 sports work on half the revenue?”

Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany thinks de-emphasizing athletics in a way that resembles, say, a Division III model could be an answer. In reality, it’s not.

(On that subject, O’Bannon plaintiffs want new depositions from Delany and others.)

Dan Wetzel of Yahoo! Sports recently broke down what he thinks is fuzzy math from college athletic admins, posing the theoretical question “if Michigan doesn’t think it should pay for a field hockey team, then why does it think Denard Robinson should?”

But there would need to be adjustments made on the university’s behalf.‘s legal expert Michael McCann said coaching salaries could go down and some teams — perhaps men’s to continue to comply with Title IX — may be cut as a result of an O’Bannon victory.

How, then, do universities prepare for that now? That’s a difficult question to answer. From NCAA guru John Infante:

Keep in mind that if the O’Bannon plaintiffs win, it would be the co-defendants owing the damages; conferences would only have to pony up to athletes going forward. Still, even advocates of pay-for-play or additional stipends [/ahem] have to understand it would be the universities stuck with the challenge of trying to rearrange funds to make it all work.

The formula for how to pay players has been nearly impossible to create in a way that makes everyone happy, but if the O’Bannon plaintiffs defeat the NCAA, it likely won’t matter. Conferences and schools will have to adjust financially — let’s table hyperbolic ultimatums such as Delany’s DIII threat or breaking away from the NCAA for now — to compensate certain athletes.

And, like it or not, the amateur model as we know it today will be gone.

Starting Navy S Kwazel Bertrand undergoes surgery, likely out for season

Kwazel Bertrand, Jacobi Owens
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Navy has seen one of its most productive players on the defensive side of the ball play for perhaps the final time this season.

Kwazel Bertrand sustained a broken ankle in the win over Air Force last Saturday, head coach Ken Niumatalolo confirmed earlier this week. As a result, the defensive back will very likely miss the remainder of the 2015 season.

And, because he is a senior and has no other eligibility avenues to pursue, it would effectively end his collegiate career as well.

“I feel terrible for Kwazel. It’s really unfortunate any time a senior goes down with a season-ending injury,” Niumatalolo said. “Kwazel has been a really good player for us and we’re going to miss his presence out on the field.”

Bertrand started 27 games over the past three-plus seasons, including all four in 2015.

Unitas Award whittles watch list in half down to 15

FORT WORTH, TX - OCTOBER 03:  Trevone Boykin #2 of the TCU Horned Frogs looks for an open receiver against the Texas Longhorns in the second quarter at Amon G. Carter Stadium on October 3, 2015 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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You know how I know we’re gradually creeping up on the end of another regular season?  Watch lists are being whittled.

The first major honor to do so is the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, which is given out annually to the best quarterback who is a college senior or fourth-year junior.  The preseason watch list was 30 quarterbacks strong; the newest list has been cut in half to 15.

The most recent list includes one of the top Heisman contenders (TCU’s Trevone Boykin) and the top two nationally in passing yards (Bowling Green’s Matt Johnson, Western Kentucky’s Brandon Doughty), as well as a quarterback who’s closing in on the all-time FBS record for rushing touchdowns (Navy’s Keenan Reynolds).

The Pac-12 leads all conferences with three watch listers, followed by two each from the AAC, ACC and Big Ten.  The SEC has as many players (one, Mississippi State’s Dak Prescott) as the FCS (North Dakota State’s Carson Wentz).

Last year’s winner was Marcus Mariota of Oregon.

Trevone Boykin, TCU
Jacoby Brissett, NC State
Connor Cook, Michigan State
Brandon Doughty, WKU
Everett Golson, Florida State
Kevin Hogan, Stanford
Matt Johnson, Bowling Green
Cody Kessler, USC
Paxton Lynch, Memphis
Dak Prescott, Mississippi State
Keenan Reynolds, Navy
Nate Sudfeld, Indiana
Carson Wentz, N. Dakota State
Marquise Williams, North Carolina
Travis Wilson, Utah