Mount Union Returns Football

Coaching legend Larry Kehres stepping down at Mount Union

12 Comments

Normally we here at CFT have next to nothing — if that — to do with the Div. III level of college football.  Larry Kehres, though, is not the norm when it comes to that level, or any other level for that matter.

In a surprise announcement Wednesday morning, Mount Union (Ohio) confirmed that the legendary long-time head coach has decided to step down from his post.  The decision is effective immediately.

The 63-year-old Kehres has been the head coach at his alma mater for 27 years and has been at the school for the last 39.  He will remain on as the athletic director.

“The best part of the job was developing relationships with players and continuing those relationships following their graduations,” commented Kehres. “Coaching the Purple Raiders has been a tremendous experience for my family.  We have shared many great experiences with our players, fellow coaches, trainers and their families. We plan to continue to enjoy working with Mount Union coaches and athletes.”

Whether the Purple Raiders continue to enjoy the unparalleled success the D-III football program had under Kehres remains to be seen.

The raw stats involved in Kehres’ 27-year run are stunning and mind-boggling.  Kehres finishes his career with a 332-24-3 (.924) overall record, with the winning percentage ranking No. 1 in the history of college football at any level (No. 2? Notre Dame’s Knute Rockne at .881).

The Purple Raiders won 11 D-III national championships (1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2012) under Kehres, losing in the finals five other times as well as in the semifinals four times. To go along with the national success was conference supremacy, with the Purple Raiders claiming 23 league titles, including the last 21 in a row.  Mount Union lost a total of eight conference games with Kehres on the sidelines, and just two since the beginning of the 1992 season.

Perhaps most amazingly, Mount Union finished the regular season undefeated 21 times during Kehres’ 27 years at the school, and haven’t lost a non-playoff game since 2005.

During Kehres’ time at the school, the Purple Raiders went on 54- and 55-game winning streaks.

“Coach Kehres has been an incredible success, not only in winning football games and national championships at an unprecedented level, but also in positively shaping the lives of countless student athletes,” Mount Union president Dr. Richard Giese stated. “His impact on Mount Union has been dramatic, and the entire Raider family will clearly miss him on the sideline.  Larry, his wife Linda, and the Kehres family are a special part of the fabric that makes Mount Union unique, and we are indeed grateful.  We are pleased that Larry will still be leading our entire, highly successful athletic program as director of athletics, and we are appreciative for both what he has done and what he will continue to do for Mount Union.”

The person who will have the unenviable task of stepping into Kehres’ shoes is an individual who is quite familiar with both Larry Kehres the coach and Larry Kehres the person.

In conjunction with Kehres’ retirement, the school announced that Vince Kehres, the now-former head coach’s son, will take over for his father.  The younger Kehres played for the Purple Raiders and has spent the past 13 seasons on his dad’s coaching staff, the last eight as defensive coordinator.

“Obviously Mount Union football has been a part of my entire life,” stated Vince.  “I have a passion for coaching and working with young men and I can think of no better place to do that then at Mount Union.  I promise this program will continue to uphold the values and ideals that have made Mount Union what it is in the world of college football,” said Vince Kehres.  “Our mission remains the same — bring quality young men to this place and allow them the opportunity to grow and be successful on and off the field.”

New MLS stadium in San Diego could have plenty of perks for San Diego State football

SAN DIEGO, CA - JANUARY 01: A general view of the San Diego Chargers vs. Kansas City Chiefs en route to Chiefs 37-27 win over the Chargers at Qualcomm Stadium on January 1, 2017 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Donald Miralle/Getty Images)
Photo by Donald Miralle/Getty Images
Leave a comment

San Diego State is already locked in to continue playing games in Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego through the 2020 season, which may be perfect timing. A move to build a brand new Major League Soccer stadium is projected to open its doors in 2020, and the plan is to have room for San Diego State to share the stadium as well.

As detailed by a report from The San Diego Union-Tribune, FS Investors is an investment group that owns the rights to apply for a MLS franchise in San Diego. While still working out the finer details of their bid, but the company is reportedly planning to purchase the land containing Qualcomm Stadium, demolish the existing stadium and use that land to develop a new venue that could seat between 20,000 and 30,000 fans. At the same time, other land would be set aside in order to reserve for a potential NFL stadium in the event the city makes a bid to lure the National Football League back to the city after the Chargers packed up and left for Los Angeles.

The firm also hopes it can attract developers to add housing and commercial options that will target San Diego State students, and perhaps add to the environment around a soccer and college football stadium for a more enjoyable game day experience for both.

An application for an MLS franchise is due January 31 and the firm hopes to receive approval from City Council without having to rely on a public vote.

Report: USF working to extend lease with Raymond James Stadium

TAMPA, FL - JANUARY 09:  A general view during the fourth quarter of the 2017 College Football Playoff National Championship Game between the Alabama Crimson Tide and the Clemson Tigers at Raymond James Stadium on January 9, 2017 in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images
Leave a comment

In an ideal world, every FBS program would have its own place to call home, but the reality is a number of schools must work out lease agreements to play home game sin NFL stadiums. USF is reportedly set to continue renting space in Raymond James Stadium in Tampa for the next six years.

According to a report from Tampa Bay Times, USF will not have to pay a rental fee and will just have to handle costs of operation on game day. In addition, USF will have to pay a ticket surcharge of eight percent off the sales of tickets, with a cap of $2.50 for each ticket sold. USF also has an opt-out clause if it desires.

Under the terms of the agreement between USF and the Tampa Sports Authority, USF must play at least six games in Raymond James Stadium each season. USF will play seven home games this upcoming season, including conference games against Cincinnati, Houston, Temple and Tulsa. Other home games will be played against Illinois, UMass and Stony Brook.

USF continues to evaluate long-term plans that could lead to the construction of an on-campus football facility, but for the next six years, it will call Raymond James Stadium home.

Baker Mayfield, J.T. Barrett, Lamar Jackson and Sam Darnold among 2017 Heisman Trophy favorites

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 10:  Quarterback Lamar Jackson of the Louisville Cardinals poses with the trophy after being named the 82nd Heisman Memorial Trophy Award winner during the 2016 Heisman Trophy Presentation at the Best Buy Theater on December 10, 2016 in New York City.  (Photo by Todd Van Emst - Pool/Getty Images)
Photo by Todd Van Emst - Pool/Getty Images
2 Comments

The new college football season may still be a long way away, but it is never too early to place your bets on who you think will win the Heisman Trophy in the 2017 season. The very early favorite, according to odds released by Bovada on Monday, is Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield.

Bovada gives Mayfield 11/2 odds to win the Heisman Trophy this fall. He is followed by Ohio State’s J.T. Barrett (6/1), which sets up a nice Heisman Trophy showdown in September when the defending Big 12 champions head to Columbus for the second game in a home-and-home series that was won by Ohio State in Norman in 2016. Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, the 2016 Heisman Trophy winner, is listed with 7/1 odds, with USC’s rising star quarterback Sam Darnold listed at 9/1.

Penn State’s dynamic duo of running back Saquon Barkley and quarterback Trace McSorley each have 10/1 odds, along with Washington quarterback Jake Browning.

Looking back to the early odds from last January, Barrett and Mayfield each had 10/1 Heisman odds. Louisville’s Jackson was not on the radar.

The three biggest overperformering and underperformering teams of 2016

BATON ROUGE, LA - OCTOBER 22: Head coach Ed Orgeron of the LSU Tigers leads his team on the field before a game against the Mississippi Rebels at Tiger Stadium on October 22, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  (Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images)
Getty Images
2 Comments

It’s been two weeks since Clemson dramatically was crowned champions of the College Football Playoff over Alabama, putting a close on the 2016 season. The dust is settled and recruiting pushes are the focus across the country, but how about one final look back at what happened last season?

I’m a devoted follower of S&P+, which measures a team’s efficiency, explosiveness, field position, drive finishing and turnovers (it’s pretty intuitive; for a brief primer click here, for a full glossary, click here). I generally use S&P+ rankings as a way to see which teams did the things necessary to be successful, though they don’t tell the whole story — a few bad fourth quarters, strange coaching decisions and/or special teams gaffes can skew a team’s record down, for example (see: Notre Dame).

So let’s take a quick look at which teams over-performed their S&P+ ranking:

West Virginia (S&P+: 29, final record: 10-3)

The Mountaineers were the lowest-ranked 10-win Power 5 team by S&P+, and their No. 29 ranking put them behind two sub-.500 teams that we’ll get to later.

Georgia (S&P+: 68, final record: 8-5)

Georgia finished one spot ahead of fellow SEC East side Mizzou, which went 4-8. The Bulldogs won two games they were expected to lose by S&P+ (over Mizzou and Auburn).

Boston College (S&P+: 86, final record: 7-6)

Steve Addazio’s dudes were the lowest-ranked Power 5 team to finish with a record over .500 and finished only two spots ahead of 2-10 Virginia.

And now, the underperformers:

LSU (S&P+: 4, final record: 8-4)

By S&P+, LSU did the things necessary to get them into the College Football Playoff, though they didn’t show up in three of their five games against top-15 opponents (even if those games resulted in close losses). For a team that changed coaches mid-season, though, eight wins sounds about right.

Notre Dame (S&P+: 26, final record: 4-8)

Seven of Notre Dame’s eight losses came by eight points or fewer, and the toxic combination of awful early-season defense (in losses to Texas, Michigan State and Duke), brutal special teams mistakes (in losses to Michigan State, Duke and N.C. State), head-scratching coaching decisions (in losses to N.C. State, Stanford and Navy) and second-half nosedives (in losses to Stanford and Virginia Tech) were the perfect recipe for a team that did enough things right to at least make a bowl game finishing with an embarrassing 4-8 record.

Ole Miss (S&P+: 27, final record: 5-7)

Ole Miss had a greater than 50 percent win expectancy against Alabama (63 percent) and Arkansas (70 percent) and lost both games. But the Rebels’ final three games were horrid, with win expectancies of 18 percent, zero percent and zero percent against Texas A&M, Vanderbilt and Mississippi State.