Nick Saban

Nick Saban on Bob Stoops’ SEC comments: ‘I’ve got more important things to do’

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Earlier this week, Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops cause a bit of an offseason stir* when he challenged the perception that the SEC was widening the gap between itself and the rest of college football.

(*Meaning it’s actually not that big of a deal)

Here’s part of what Stoops said, via the Tulsa World:

“It depends on who you want to listen to,” Stoops said. “Listen, they’ve had the best team in college football, meaning they’ve won the national championship. That doesn’t mean everything else is always the best.”

“So you’re listening to a lot of propaganda that gets fed out to you,” he said. “You’re more than smart enough to figure it out. Again, you can look at the top two, three, four, five, six teams, and you can look at the bottom six, seven, eight, whatever they are. How well are they all doing?

“What’d we (the Big 12) have, eight of 10 teams in bowl games this year? Again, you figure it all out.”

Naturally, the press had to know Nick Saban‘s reaction to Stoops’ comments. When asked about them, Saban went on a lengthy retort spanning somewhere in the vicinity of five whole seconds:

“I’ve got more important things to do than sit around and read what Bob Stoops has to say about anything.”

Like win three BCS championships in four years? Yeah, he can be dismissive about it. Us? We have more time on our hands. So…

To Stoops’ credit, he has a point. The Big 12 has been especially deep the last couple of years. Conversely, parity wasn’t exactly present in the SEC last season. No SEC team who finished in the bottom seven of the final conference standings beat a team who finished in the top seven of the league. Of course, that’s a little misleading as not everyone in the SEC plays each other whereas the Big 12 plays a round robin schedule, but the point remains. The SEC’s been top-heavy and won the past seven BCS championships. It’s perception is going to be based on what the top half does, not the bottom half.

Then there are the NFL draft numbers by conference, but has John Hoover explains in his aforementioned column from the Tulsa World,  “it’s much the same way: 46 of the 63 came from the top half of the league. The other seven schools produced just 17 draft picks.”

Again, top-heavy. And, in fairness, you could put an asterisk next to the draft picks from Texas A&M and Missouri, both of which had first-round picks this past draft and are only one year removed from the Big 12. That lends itself to another point from Saban:

Well, A&M didn’t seem to have a problem in its first season — and in a year when few people actually thought the Aggies would do well in any conference, no less. There’s plenty of good football being played outside the SEC, but until someone actually knocks the SEC off the top of the college football mountain — preseason publications are looking at you, Ohio State — the perception Stoops chimed in on likely won’t change.

Third 2016 Baylor signee set to move on to Texas

DALLAS - OCTOBER 11:  The Texas Longhorns band enters the field before a game against the Oklahoma Sooners at the Cotton Bowl on October 11, 2008 in Dallas, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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This past week, Texas confirmed four-star 2016 Baylor signee Devin Duvernay had joined Charlie Strong‘s football program, just a couple of days after BU announced five 2016 signees had been granted releases from their National Letters of Intent.  Shortly after that, another 2016 BU signee, offensive lineman J.P. Urquidez, revealed via Twitter that he too will be moving on to the Longhorns.

Now, another has migrated from Waco to Austin.

According to a report from ESPN.com, Donovan Duvernay has committed to play his college football for Texas.  This Duvernay is the twin brother of Devan Duvernay.

The wide receiver will be eligible to play for the Longhorns in 2016.

A three-star member of the Bears’ 2016 recruiting class, Duvernay was rated as the No. 61 athlete in the country and the No. 113 player at any position in the state of Texas.

Texas the landing spot for second four-star 2016 Baylor signee

SAN ANTONIO, TX - DECEMBER 30:  Texas Longhorns mascot Bevo wears a harness in honor of head coach Mack Brown during the Valero Alamo Bowl against the Oregon Ducks at the Alamodome on December 30, 2013 in San Antonio, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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In the end, Baylor’s loss will turn into Texas’ gain.  Again.

Just a couple of days after Baylor announced five 2016 signees had been granted releases from their National Letters of Intent, one of those prospects announced their new landing spot.  And, to add insult to injury, said landing spot is a fellow Big 12 member.

And the state’s flagship university for good measure.

Pictured with Texas head coach Charlie Strong, that would be offensive lineman J.P. Urquidez announcing that he will begin his collegiate playing career with the Longhorns. And the get for UT, at least when it comes to recruiting pedigree, is a huge one.

Urquidez was a four-star BU signee this past February, rated as the No. 22 offensive tackle; the No. 37 player at any position in the state of Texas; and the No. 244 player on 247Sports.com‘s composite board.

The lineman becomes the second 2016 Bears signee to join the Longhorns since the sexual assault scandal slammed headfirst into Waco. Late this past week, UT confirmed the addition of four-star wide receiver Devin Duvernay.

Reportedly transferring from Vols, Ray Raulerson confirms he’s ‘exploring options’

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Thursday, reports surfaced that two Tennessee offensive linemen would be leaving the Volunteers football program and possibly transferring to the FCS level.  Friday, one of those two confirmed he’s looking into it.

Speaking to The Knoxville News Sentinel, Ray Raulerson acknowledged that he’s “exploring options right now,” although he stopped short of confirming a transfer.  However, the redshirt sophomore center talked of his time in Knoxville in the past tense, an indication that he is prepared to move on.

“I’m exploring options right now,” Raulerson told the News Sentinel. “…I really loved it at Tennessee, but I’m going to go to a place where I have a better chance to play.”

Raulerson was a three-star member of UT’s 2014 recruiting class.  After redshirting as a true freshman, he played in five games in 2015.

It has yet to be confirmed that the other lineman, fifth-year senior tackle Dontavius Blair, is indeed transferring.  Raulerson, though, told the newspaper that his teammate is leaving as well.

Clemson tables proposal that would’ve had students paying for some football tickets

CLEMSON, SC - AUGUST 31: Clemson Tigers fans celebrate at the start of the game against the Georgia Bulldogs at Memorial Stadium on August 31, 2013 in Clemson, South Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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Students at Clemson can rest easy; your football fix will still be free of charge this year.

In 2015, tickets for the student sections in both the lower bowl and upper bowl of Memorial Stadium came at no cost to those enrolled in classes at the university.  In April, however, athletic director Dan Radakovich proposed levying what was described as a “$225 student donation” for those wishing to sit in the lower bowl on season tickets, while the upper bowl seats would remain free.

Late this past week, tigernet.com reported, Radakovich’s proposal was tabled as the university will “continue to have good conversations with student leaders about the entire ticketing process.”

So, for the 2016 football season, tickets in both bowls will come at no cost to students.  As was the case last year, all of those tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

It wasn’t all good news financially for Clemson students — or their parents — as The State news paper writes that “[t]he university’s board of trustees voted almost unanimously via teleconference Thursday to raise tuition rates for the 2016-17 year for in-state and out-of-state students.”