Howard's Rock

Clemson confirms iconic Howard’s Rock was vandalized

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And before you ask, no, we have no clue where Harvey Updyke was involved.

Earlier today, Twitter chatter began to surface that the famed Howard’s Rock at Clemson’s Memorial Stadium was vandalized at some point of late by an unknown number of perpetrators.  In a press release Wednesday evening, the school confirmed that The Rock , named in honor of legendary Tigers head coach and College Football Hall of Famer Frank Howard, “was vandalized sometime  June 2nd or June 3rd.”

“We take vandalism, especially of such an important part of our history, very seriously,” said athletic director Dan Radakovich in a statement. “Police are investigating.”

The release from the school added that “[a] small portion of The Rock was broken off of its pedestal after vandals broke the casing that protects the artifact.”

Thanks to one of CFT’s Twitter followers — thank you, @trentacker for the heads up — we have what’s believed to be photographic evidence of the damage done to The Rock:

Howard's Rock

And, for those unfamiliar with Howard’s Rock, here’s a video clip of as well as the Wiki description of the hallowed tradition:

In the early 1960s, the rock was given to then head coach Frank Howard by a friend, Samuel Columbus Jones (Clemson Class of 1919). It was presented to Howard by Jones, saying “Here’s a rock from Death Valley, California, to Death Valley, South Carolina.” Howard didn’t think anything else about the rock and it was used as a door stop in his office for several years. In September 1966, while cleaning out his office, Howard noticed the rock and told IPTAY executive director Gene Willimon, “Take this rock and throw it over the fence or out in the ditch…do something with it, but get it out of my office.” Willimon had the rock placed on a pedestal at the top of the east endzone hill that the team ran down to enter the field for games. On September 24, 1966, the first time Clemson players ran by the rock, they beat conference rival Virginia, 40-35. Howard, seizing on the motivational potential of “The Rock”, told his players, “Give me 110% or keep your filthy hands off of my rock.” The team started rubbing the Rock for the first game of 1967, which was a 23-6 waxing of ACC foe Wake Forest.

It is now a tradition for the Clemson Army ROTC to “protect” the Rock for the 24 hours prior to the Clemson-South Carolina game when held in Death Valley. ROTC cadets keep a steady drum cadence around the rock prior to the game, which can be heard across the campus. Part of the tradition comes after unknown parties vandalized the Rock prior to the 1992 Carolina-Clemson game.

Colin McGovern becomes second Notre Dame lineman in a month to transfer to Virginia

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - SEPTEMBER 25: The Virginia Cavaliers band plays during the first half against the Boise State Broncos at Scott Stadium on September 25, 2015 in Charlottesville, Virginia.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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In December, John Montelus opted to transfer to Virginia after deciding to leave Notre Dame.  A month later, and the offensive lineman will have some former Irish company in Charlottesville.

Following up on speculation that’s been growing for days, Colin McGovern confirmed to the South Bend Tribune that he too has decided to transfer from the Fighting Irish to the Cavaliers.  As the offensive lineman will be leaving South Bend as a graduate transfer, he’ll be eligible to play immediately for UVa. in 2017.

The upcoming season will be McGovern’s final year of eligibility.

After playing in 10 games his first three years with the Fighting Irish, McGovern played in 11 this past season.  He started eight games at right guard in 2016, marking the first starts of his collegiate career.

A four-star 2013 signee, McGovern was rated as the No. 13 offensive tackle in the country and the No. 7 player at any position in the state of Illinois.

Report: Miami blocking Gus Edwards from transferring to Pitt, Syracuse

RALEIGH, NC - NOVEMBER 19: Gus Edwards #7 of the Miami Hurricanes runs with the ball against Josh Jones #11 of the North Carolina State Wolfpack at Carter-Finley Stadium on November 19, 2016 in Raleigh, North Carolina. Miami won 27-13. (Photo by Lance King/Getty Images)
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While the head coach at Georgia, Mark Richt had a (very classy) policy of permitting his transferring  players to move onto any other institution they desired with no restrictions, including other SEC schools or even teams on the Bulldogs’ non-conference schedules.  Apparently, though, that policy hasn’t followed him to Miami.

A Staten Island native, Gus Edwards has opted to transfer from the Hurricanes in order to be closer to his home as he became a father earlier this month.  It had been reported that teams such as Boston College, Connecticut, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, Syracuse and Temple would be of interest to the running back.  Two of those potential landing spots, however, reportedly won’t be an option.

From Scout.com:

According to a source close to Edwards, the Hurricanes and head coach Mark Richt are blocking the running back from picking a school who is on Miami’s 2017 schedule. That means two potential landing spots that are close to home and therefore meet his criteria, Pittsburgh and Syracuse, are blocked by the program.

Not only is that an about-face from his stance at UGA, it’s a 180-degree turn away from Richt’s own words during his first summer camp at The U just five months ago.

“I’ve unconditionally released any guy that ever wanted to leave, because I think life’s too short,” Richt said back in August according to the Miami Herald. “I would call the commissioner and say, ‘The kid wants to go. Wherever he wants to go, let him go.’ I think we had two kids go to Alabama, at least one went to Auburn, maybe two. But I don’t put any limitations.”

The driving force behind Richt’s apparent change of heart appears to be his boss.

“Institutionally, our policy has been that we would not do that for a school we’re going to play in the upcoming season,” UM athletic director Blake James said according to the Palm Beach Post.

Edwards, who will be leaving the football program as a graduate transfer, has yet to formally request a transfer, James added.

Shai McKenzie details restrictions place on Virginia Tech transfer

BLACKSBURG, VA - SEPTEMBER 27:  Running back Shai McKenzie #22 of the Virginia Tech Hokies breaks a tackle against the Western Michigan Broncos in the second half at Lane Stadium on September 27, 2014 in Blacksburg, Virginia. Virginia Tech defeated Western Michigan 35-17. (Photo by Michael Shroyer/Getty Images)
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Right or wrong, but unsurprisingly, Shai McKenzie‘s departure from Blacksburg comes with some strings attached.

Nearly two weeks ago, McKenzie took to Twitter to announce his decision to transfer from Virginia Tech and continue his collegiate playing career elsewhere.  On the same social media site Monday, the running back revealed that his future elsewhere won’t include any ACC schools as well as none of the teams on the Hokies’ 2017 and 2018 non-conference schedules.

The latter group includes Notre Dame, West Virginia, East Carolina, Old Dominion, Delaware and William & Mary.

A four-star 2014 recruit, only one signee was rated higher than McKenzie in Tech’s class that year.

The Pennsylvania native’s career actually began with promise as he was second on the team in rushing as a true freshman when he went down with a torn ACL in the fifth game of the season.  At that time, McKenzie had 269 yards on the ground; in the two years since, he ran for a combined 126 yards.  His 2015 season was limited to two games because of the lingering effects of the ACL injury.

TCU’s leading rusher arrested for public intoxication

MEMPHIS, TN - DECEMBER 30: Running back Kyle Hicks #21 of the TCU Horned Frogs looks to maneuver by linebacker Roquan Smith #3 of the Georgia Bulldogs at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium on December 30, 2016 in Memphis, Tennessee. The Georgia Bulldogs defeated the TCU Horned Frogs 31-23. (Photo by Michael Chang/Getty Images)
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As the 2017 offseason kicks into high gear, so have the annual and ever-present off-field issues.

According to multiple media outlets, TCU running back Kyle Hicks was arrested over the weekend on a misdemeanor charge of public intoxication.  The 22-year-old Hicks and two former Horned Frog football players, Bryson Henderson and George Baltimore, were charged after police responded to reports of a fight at a Whataburger near campus very early Saturday morning.

No further details of what led to the police being called have been released.

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram writes that “[t]he TCU athletics department said in a statement Monday night that officials are aware of the incident and looking into it.”

As a junior this past season, Hicks led TCU with 1,042 yards and 12 rushing touchdowns.  He also led the team in receptions with 47, becoming the first Horned Frog player to lead the team in both rushing and receiving since Basil Mitchell in 1996.

Hicks is expected to again be the focal point of TCU’s offense in 2017.