AAron Hernandez

Gainesville PD confirms Aaron Hernandez ‘questioned very briefly’ in ’07 shooting


The sad, sordid soap opera that is Aaron Hernandez would not normally fall under the purview of CFT, but a confirmed development has prompted us to at least dip our toes into the evolving tragedy.

Following up on the speculation in the days since the now-former New England Patriots player was arrested on a first-degree murder charge — and his potential role in a double homicide last year has seen the public light — Gainesville police confirmed to the Gainesville Sun Saturday that Hernandez was “questioned very briefly” in regards to a shooting in late September of 2007 that injured two individuals.  From the Sun:

Corey T. Smith, now 33, and Justin E. Glass, now 24, were in a car stopped in westbound traffic when Smith, the passenger, was shot in the head. Glass was shot in the arm by a man police said walked up to the car and fired several shots from a handgun.

Several members of the Gators at the time were interviewed by police in connection to the shootings, including Hernandez as well as, the paper reported, players such as Reggie Nelson and the Pouncey twins, Mike and Maurkice.

“Hernandez’s name came up once in the report and he was questioned very briefly,” Gainesville police officer Ben Tobias told the paper. “Anytime we have an incident like that, we investigate and follow any lead whatsoever. We got his name as being in the area of that club, so we questioned him.”

No arrests have been made and the case remains open.

Hernandez played for the Gators from 2007-10 and was a member of Urban Meyer‘s third UF recruiting class.  Meyer, now the head coach at Ohio State, has come under scrutiny since his former player’s arrest, with the New York Times publishing an exposé in which the paper wrote that the coach said the talented but troubled player “had been rehabilitated with daily Bible study sessions that the coach conducted personally.”

Report: Texas likely to keep Hooking ‘Em with Nike, not Under Armour

Jerrod Heard

It is no secret that Under Armour is making a nice serious push in acquiring university apparel deals, but the Texas Longhorns is not one it will be likely to whisk away from The Swoosh. According to one report from the Austin American-Statesman, University of Texas officials broke off a meeting with Under Armour and are now expected to stay with Nike moving forward.

The University of Texas has been a partner with Nike since 2000. The contract between the two gives Nike an exclusive window in which it can match or improve on any offers made to the school from rival companies such as Under Armour or Adidas. It is unknown if Under Armour made a formal offer to Texas or how much such an offer could have been valued. What is pretty much commonly known is the Texas brand is still a nice asset in the athletics apparel business, even if the Longhorns are struggling on the football field. Having Texas wear your gear is still a quality investment, which makes Texas a highly sought-after commodity.

Per the American-Statesman report, Texas is expected to sign what would be the biggest deal currently going in collegiate athletics. Considering the handsome deal recently signed between Nike and Michigan, that would mean Texas would be looking forward to more than $169 million from Nike. Michigan signed a 15-year contract valued at $169 million, which will bring an end to its current relationship with Adidas in 2016. As part of the deal, Michigan will become the first football program to wear the Jordan brand logo on its football uniforms. Could Texas be the next? For now that is just something to ponder.

Nike recently lost partners at Arizona State and Miami. Last year Notre Dame began a new partnership with Under Armour, signing a $90 million contract.

Rutgers hires law firm specializing in NCAA violations; NCAA not digging around just yet

Kyle Flood

The first month of the football season at Rutgers has had its share of off-field stories worth keeping an eye on, so the news on Tuesday that the university has hired Bond, Schoeneck & King, a law firm with a history of working on NCAA violation cases, is certainly a bit of an eye-opener. The NCAA is not, at this time, investigating Rutgers. Instead, this is a move to investigate a pair of concerns related to the football program so that they may be properly reported to the NCAA if and when needed.

“Rutgers has retained outside counsel with expertise in NCAA infractions to help identify any potential rules violations,” Rutgers senior vice president for external affairs Peter McDonough said in a report published by NJ.com. “This is an ongoing and rigorous process that helps us to identify any shortcomings, to self-report them as required by NCAA rules and to remedy them as best practices demand.”

According to the report from NJ.com, Rutgers is focusing on one allegation of an arrested player failing multiple drug tests while on the team and accusations related to the program’s ambassador program. The name of the former player was not identified in the report. The ambassador program has come into scrutiny following the evolving case related to wide receiver Leonte Carroo.

The hired firm tends to serve as a liaison with the NCAA, but Rutgers will be given a final copy of the firm’s investigation for review. If Rutgers determines any NCAA violations were commited as determined by the report, that information will be passed on to the NCAA. The information revealed or uncovered in the firm’s investigation will determine if the NCAA will have to do some of its own digging, or merely adopt the firm’s report at face value and decide on any appropriate punishment from there.