Keith Price

Washington defends Pac-12 honor, routs Boise State


Boise State’s reign of terror over the Pac-12 has come to a resounding end.

Washington got 324 passing yards from Keith Price and 161 rushing yards from Bishop Sankey as the Huskies dominated the No. 19 Broncos, 38-6, before a jacked-up crowd in the newly-renovated Husky Stadium.

The victory snapped BSU’s five-game win streak over Pac-12 teams that dated back to 2007, when the Huskies beat the Broncos, 24-10. It was easily the worst loss of the Chris Petersen era at Boise and the program’s largest margin of defeat since Georgia pounded BSU, 48-13, in the 2005 opener.

Big credit to the Huskies for looking sharp and well-prepared. For the first time in a while, Washington displayed the kind of speed and athleticism needed to dominate a quality opponent. The Huskies piled up 592 yards of total offense and limited the usually-proficient Broncos offense to just 346 total yards. UW was strongest in the second half, outscoring BSU, 28-3.

For the first time in a while, Boise State looked overmatched against a Pac-12 team. The Broncos passing game was anemic, netting just 175 yards on 46 attempts. The run game wasn’t much better, averaging 4.1 yards per carry. The defense couldn’t keep up with the quick Husky receivers and often found itself confounded by Washington’s multiple, up-tempo scheme.

In other words, the Broncos looked a lot like Washington circa four years ago. Could this loss signal the end of Boise State’s dominant run as the preeminent non-BCS power? Will this Broncos squad be able to turn it around in time to stretch Petersen’s streak of 10-win seasons to eight? Based on how BSU played against Washington, it might not happen.

Bigger questions remain for Washington. Does this win indicate that Steve Sarkisian‘s program is finally ready to break out from its 7-6 gulag of the past three seasons? Will it finally reclaim its traditional place among the powers of the Pac-12 North?

Based on how Washington looked against Boise, it could happen.


Rutgers hires law firm specializing in NCAA violations; NCAA not digging around just yet

Kyle Flood
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The first month of the football season at Rutgers has had its share of off-field stories worth keeping an eye on, so the news on Tuesday that the university has hired Bond, Schoeneck & King, a law firm with a history of working on NCAA violation cases, is certainly a bit of an eye-opener. The NCAA is not, at this time, investigating Rutgers. Instead, this is a move to investigate a pair of concerns related to the football program so that they may be properly reported to the NCAA if and when needed.

“Rutgers has retained outside counsel with expertise in NCAA infractions to help identify any potential rules violations,” Rutgers senior vice president for external affairs Peter McDonough said in a report published by “This is an ongoing and rigorous process that helps us to identify any shortcomings, to self-report them as required by NCAA rules and to remedy them as best practices demand.”

According to the report from, Rutgers is focusing on one allegation of an arrested player failing multiple drug tests while on the team and accusations related to the program’s ambassador program. The name of the former player was not identified in the report. The ambassador program has come into scrutiny following the evolving case related to wide receiver Leonte Carroo.

The hired firm tends to serve as a liaison with the NCAA, but Rutgers will be given a final copy of the firm’s investigation for review. If Rutgers determines any NCAA violations were commited as determined by the report, that information will be passed on to the NCAA. The information revealed or uncovered in the firm’s investigation will determine if the NCAA will have to do some of its own digging, or merely adopt the firm’s report at face value and decide on any appropriate punishment from there.

Rutgers WR Carroo expected to have assault charges dropped

Leonte Carroo
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Rutgers wide receiver Leonte Carroo could have a charge of simple assault dropped by a New Jersey court today. The woman he is accused of slamming to the concrete has agreed to drop the restraining order request and has asked the assault charge against the Rutgers receiver be dropped as well. reports today the woman and Carroo each appeared in a family court on Tuesday, and the woman told the judge she is not scared of Carroo.

So, what does this mean for football? Simply put, it means Carroo may be eligible to play again as soon as this weekend. That would be good timing, as Rutgers is set to host Michigan State this Saturday night.

Carroo has been sitting out while serving an indefinite suspension while this legal process plays out. Carroo has missed each of the last two games for Rutgers, against Penn State and Kansas. Rutgers was off this past weekend. If this legal process does play out as it is expected at this point, Carroo could be reinstated quickly and promptly, making him eligible to return right away. Carroo is one fo the best players on the roster, so having him back and eligible to play is very good news for the Scarlet Knights offense.