Stanford’s Shaw doesn’t take SEC comparisons as compliment

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The Stanford Cardinal have emerged as a respectable force in the college football world over the last few years. The changing of the culture and approach to Stanford football started with Jim Harbaugh turning things around and David Shaw has continued to lead Stanford on the same path. The Cardinal play a physical style that manages to slow down high-powered offensive systems, including Oregon, which has led some to compare Stanford’s style to those typically found in the SEC. Any comparison to the SEC would normally be well received given the conference’s string of success on the big stage, but that is not something Shaw apparently wants to hear.

“I don’t necessarily take it as a compliment,” Shaw said this week, according to San Jose Mercury News. “We play the style of football I grew up with. It’s not because that’s the way they play at Alabama or LSU. That means nothing to us.”

The style of football Stanford plays would fit in with almost any generation of football. Shaw likes to draw comparisons to the teams that played in the 1980s, including the Joe Montana-era San Francisco 49er. Those are the similarities Stanford aims for, and it makes perfect sense given the connection between the Cardinal and 49ers. Not only is Harbaugh now coaching the 49ers, but Bill Walsh previously coached both teams as well.

“It’s the right way for them to play because they can’t recruit speed the way other teams recruit speed,” former UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel said, according to San Jose Mercury Times. “David would never tip his hat to the SEC. He and Jim went back to drawing board, and this style is the best fit. They built it brilliantly.”

Stanford opens their 2013 season this weekend after not having a game scheduled last week. The defending Pac 12 champions host San Jose State in a bit of a local rivalry game. Stanford enters the game as a favorite of course, but will have to use that physical style defense to shut down the Spartans’ passing game led by David Fales. Stanford narrowly escaped against San Jose State last season, winning 20-17. Fales passed for 217 yards and a touchdown in the game, which was tied at 17-17 entering the fourth quarter.

Larry Fedora part of North Carolina contingent attending mid-August NCAA hearing

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I’m quite certain that Larry Fedora is absolutely thrilled over this development.

On Aug. 1, North Carolina football players will report to campus.  A day later, the Tar Heels will kick off their sixth summer camp under Fedora.  Exactly two weeks after that?  Fedora will be forced to leave his football squad as part of the UNC contingent that will be in attendance at the university’s hearing in front of the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions.

The two-day hearing will take place Aug. 16-17 in Nashville, Tenn.

The news comes exactly two months after, for the third time in as many years, UNC responded to a Notice of Allegations connected to a decade-long academic scandal.

In June of 2014, the NCAA informed UNC “that it would reopen its original 2011 examination of the past academic irregularities.” The first NOA was sent to the university in 2015, with UNC accused of lack of institutional control as to student-athletes in multiple sports, including football, receiving preferential access to the controversial African and Afro-American Studies (AFAM) courses dating all the way back to 2002.  In April of 2016, UNC received an amended NOA that replaced “lack of institutional control” with “failure to monitor.”

A decision from the NCAA on what if any punitive measures the football program will face is expected to come two months or so after the conclusion of the hearing.  Such a timeline would, of course, put the resolution right in the middle of the football season.

It should be noted that Fedora is not facing any type of misconduct connected to the academic scandal.

Jim Harbaugh confirms Michigan football will head to Paris, Normandy next offseason

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At least partially, Michigan players will see their offseason travel wishes for next year granted.

Fresh off their spring break trip to Rome this year, Jim Harbaugh revealed last month that his Wolverines football players, following a team vote, were eyeing a trip next year that would include stops in Paris and London.  At the Big Ten Media Days Tuesday, Harbaugh confirmed that they would indeed be taking the team to Paris around the same time next year.

Instead of London, however, U-M will take in the sights at historically-steeped Normandy.

The trip to Rome this year cost in the neighborhood of $800,000, although that particular tab was picked up by a well-heeled booster of the program. It’s expected that the same scenario financially will play out for this trip as well, regardless of the cost.

Colorado dismisses LB N.J. Falo

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The rocky tenure of N.J. Falo at Colorado has come to an abrupt end.

According to the university, the linebacker has been dismissed from head coach Mike MacIntyre‘s football program.  Other than the standard violation of unspecified team rules, no reason for the dismissal was given.

In late April of last year, Falo (pictured, No. 42) and then-Buffs running back Dino Gordon were arrested in connection to an alleged dorm-room theft.  The duo had been accused of stealing prescription drugs, laptops, video games and other electronics from a dorm room earlier that month.

Falo, who played in seven games as a true freshman in 2015, was suspended for the first three games of the 2016 season because of the incident.  After returning, the then-true sophomore played in the final 11 games of the year.  As a backup, he was credited with 12 tackles and 1.5 tackles for loss.

Because of injury, he sat atop CU’s post-spring depth chart just months ago.

Texas transfer Brandon Hodges uses Twitter to commit to Pitt

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A month after leaving Texas, Brandon Hodges has decided on a new college football home.

On his personal Twitter account Tuesday afternoon, Hodges announced that he has decided to enroll at Pittsburgh and continue his playing career with the Panthers.  As the offensive lineman is coming to the Panthers as a graduate transfer, he’ll be eligible to play immediately in 2017.

The upcoming season will be his final year of eligibility.

Hodges spent the first two seasons of his collegiate career at East Mississippi Community College before transferring to UT in 2015. He took a redshirt his first season in Austin.

Last season, Hodges started nine games at right tackle for the Longhorns. Academics forced Hodges to miss some of spring practice this year as well as the spring game, although he was able to graduate from the university not long after.