Notre Dame v USC

If misery loves company, Texas and USC are perfect partners


Hard to believe but not all that long ago Texas and USC were on top of the college football world, before the SEC started flexing conference muscle to the tune of seven consecutive BCS national championships. The 2006 BCS Championship Game was the last one not to involve a team from the SEC and instead featured USC and Texas trading blows until the clock ran out to determine the BCS champion. Little did we know, this would be the last time either was seen as a legitimate championship contender. Sure, Texas played for a BCS title a few years ago against Alabama and USC was a trendy preseason pick last year, but anyone who may have caught a glimpse of either team on Saturday may have been fooled if they did not know any better.

USC could not even muster 200 yards of offense at home against Washington State in a 10-7 loss to the Cougars. College football usually sees fans sing in unison along with the marching band performing the team’s fight song, but USC’s final moments were serenaded by a chorus of chants to pursue a coaching change.

BYU has a strong history for passing the football but on Saturday it was the ground game that led to Texas making some drastic changes on the defensive coaching staff. Texas allowed 550 rushing yards to BYU on Saturday and on Sunday the team removed Manny Diaz as defensive coordinator. The best option to take over as defensive coordinator? None other than Greg Robinson, the very same defensive coordinator who led Michigan’s worst defenses in school history.

It is no wonder that USA Today ranks Texas and USC on top of The Misery Index, which measures the reactions of fan bases around the country and takes in to account the most recent performances, expectations and future of the program. Given the belief that Texas and USC should be programs that achieve greatness with relative ease (Texas has top-notch financial support and USC is in Los Angeles). The Longhorns and Trojans are followed by another program coming off a rough weekend outing, Florida. The Gators moved the ball well and the defense locked down on Miami but turnovers proved too costly for the Gators to be able to afford in the road loss.

There is still plenty of football to be played this season, and conference championships are still a possibility for Texas, USC and Florida. One loss is not enough to completely derail a season, but don’t tell that to the fans still recovering from a rough weekend. They need more time to get over things like this. This is what being a fan is all about.

Rutgers hires law firm specializing in NCAA violations; NCAA not digging around just yet

Kyle Flood
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The first month of the football season at Rutgers has had its share of off-field stories worth keeping an eye on, so the news on Tuesday that the university has hired Bond, Schoeneck & King, a law firm with a history of working on NCAA violation cases, is certainly a bit of an eye-opener. The NCAA is not, at this time, investigating Rutgers. Instead, this is a move to investigate a pair of concerns related to the football program so that they may be properly reported to the NCAA if and when needed.

“Rutgers has retained outside counsel with expertise in NCAA infractions to help identify any potential rules violations,” Rutgers senior vice president for external affairs Peter McDonough said in a report published by “This is an ongoing and rigorous process that helps us to identify any shortcomings, to self-report them as required by NCAA rules and to remedy them as best practices demand.”

According to the report from, Rutgers is focusing on one allegation of an arrested player failing multiple drug tests while on the team and accusations related to the program’s ambassador program. The name of the former player was not identified in the report. The ambassador program has come into scrutiny following the evolving case related to wide receiver Leonte Carroo.

The hired firm tends to serve as a liaison with the NCAA, but Rutgers will be given a final copy of the firm’s investigation for review. If Rutgers determines any NCAA violations were commited as determined by the report, that information will be passed on to the NCAA. The information revealed or uncovered in the firm’s investigation will determine if the NCAA will have to do some of its own digging, or merely adopt the firm’s report at face value and decide on any appropriate punishment from there.

Rutgers WR Carroo expected to have assault charges dropped

Leonte Carroo
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Rutgers wide receiver Leonte Carroo could have a charge of simple assault dropped by a New Jersey court today. The woman he is accused of slamming to the concrete has agreed to drop the restraining order request and has asked the assault charge against the Rutgers receiver be dropped as well. reports today the woman and Carroo each appeared in a family court on Tuesday, and the woman told the judge she is not scared of Carroo.

So, what does this mean for football? Simply put, it means Carroo may be eligible to play again as soon as this weekend. That would be good timing, as Rutgers is set to host Michigan State this Saturday night.

Carroo has been sitting out while serving an indefinite suspension while this legal process plays out. Carroo has missed each of the last two games for Rutgers, against Penn State and Kansas. Rutgers was off this past weekend. If this legal process does play out as it is expected at this point, Carroo could be reinstated quickly and promptly, making him eligible to return right away. Carroo is one fo the best players on the roster, so having him back and eligible to play is very good news for the Scarlet Knights offense.