USC Introduces New Basketball Coach Andy Enfield

Pat Haden asks NCAA for ‘consideration’ of USC sanctions

11 Comments

Penn State received some “time off” for good behavior from the NCAA earlier this week.

USC is hoping for something similar — we think — from The Association.

In a statement posted to USC’s official football website, athletic director Pat Haden acknowledged that he had discussions with officials from the NCAA earlier this week.  While the meeting had been scheduled weeks earlier, Haden said, part of his time with the NCAA was spent discussing the easing of scholarship restrictions on Penn State and what if anything could be done — immediately — to the Trojans’ own scholarship restrictions.

As a result of the Reggie Bush impermissible benefits case, the Trojans were slapped with harsh sanctions in 2010, including a two-year bowl ban (already served) and the reduction of 10 scholarships per year.

While the sanctions come to an end this year, Haden proposed “‘outside the box’ solutions to scholarship issues” the AD claims is not in the best interests of our student-athlete’s welfare.  From Haden’s statement:

“After learning of the NCAA’s actions on Tuesday (Sept. 24) regarding Penn State and the lessening of the sanctions that were imposed on that institution, when viewed in the context of the events that have shaken intercollegiate athletics over the past year, we felt compelled to discuss USC’s sanctions in a new light.  As I have stated on numerous occasions, I believe the penalties imposed on our football program in 2010 were unprecedented and inconsistent with NCAA precedent in prior cases.  I also believe the sanctions have resulted in unintended consequences both for our football program and our student-athletes.  Although the sanctions reduced our total football scholarship limit to 75 (down from 85), attrition resulting from injuries and transfers has resulted in less than 60 recruited scholarship student-athletes suiting up for our games.  The current situation is certainly not what was envisioned, nor is it in the best interests of our student-athletes’ welfare.

“In reducing Penn State’s scholarship penalties, the NCAA specifically noted the ‘progress’ it had made regarding athletics integrity.  Since the Committee on Infractions (COI) issued its sanctions in 2010, USC has been held up as a model and praised for its integrity and commitment to compliance, a fact often mentioned by the NCAA itself.  Although USC had two unsuccessful bites at the apple (the original COI hearing and the appeal to the Infractions Appeals Committee), given the changing landscape impacting intercollegiate sports over the past year, the recent action regarding Penn State, the impact of the sanctions on our program and the efforts we have under taken at USC to compete with integrity, we again argued for some consideration regarding the 2010 sanctions during the last year of our penalty.”

Haden went on to state that the NCAA was open to the school’s initial proposal as “the NCAA asked us to provide additional information and indicated it would study our suggestions.  Just what “out of the box” remedy Haden is seeking in the here and now is unclear.

The AD, though, wants an answer, one way or the other, from the NCAA as soon as possible,

“Because time is of the essence regarding these issues, we have asked for the NCAA’s response as soon as practical,” Haden wrote.

The NCAA opened up a big can of worms by “correcting” a portion of Penn State’s historic sanctions.  USC won’t be the first program to go to the NCAA to seek relief from what they consider unfair sanctions; how the NCAA handles USC — and Boise State and Miami (if the NCAA ever gets down to issuing a ruling) and on and on — will be fascinating on myriad levels, not the least of which is simply watching The Association making sh… stuff up as they go along.

VIDEO: OK State QB Mason Rudolph completes pass to receiver on jet ski

Mason Rudolph jet ski pass
Mason Rudolph/Oklahoma State
Leave a comment

Who doesn’t love a good offseason trick shot video? College football has no shortage of such viral videos, including this one of Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph tossing a pass to a target cruising by on a jet ski.

More precisely, Rudolph tosses a short pass to a receiver bouncing off a diving board, who then tosses back to Rudolph, who then goes deep to a receiver going by on a jet ski.

That is one way to show off what you can do with the pigskin in the offseason. The quick little pass to the diving board target is nothing too fancy, and Rudolph passing to someone on a jet ski is not all that much different for the Cowboys quarterback than hitting a receiver in motion. The true work is done by those receiving passes from Rudolph. The first target turning around off his diving board bounce to catch and pass back to Rudolph may have been the most impressive part of it all, but the jet skie receiver had to time his position just right and catch the ball, potentially with some wet hands. Good job all around.

Helmet sticker to The Student Section.

Washington receiver leaves Huskies to combat depression and anxiety

SEATTLE, WA - SEPTEMBER 26: Washington Huskies head coach Chris Petersen walks on the sidelines during a game against the California Golden Bears at Husky Stadium on September 26, 2015 in Seattle, Washington. California won the game 30-24. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Washington wide receiver Isaiah Renfro is leaving the program after missing spring football to deal with some personal issues. Renfro announced on Sunday, via Twitter, he took time in the spring to receive treatment for a battle with depression. The true freshman explained he lost his passion for the game of football in the process and says he is stepping away from the sport and will not attend Washington.

“This year has to be one of the toughest times I’ve had to endure in my life,” Renfro explained in a lengthy Twitter post. “While going through this year I have struggled with and have been diagnosed with depression and anxiety. Everyday [sic] it’s very hard for me to just do a simple thing like get myself out of bed in the morning. This entire year I pushed through and gave it my all, till I had none left. I hate failure so I felt like I’d be cheating myself by quitting. But I started to see myself changing… I wasn’t the same, I lost love for the game I’ve been playing ever since I could walk, and it seemed more like a job to me than fun.”

Renfro was a three-star recruit out of California in the Class of 2015 according to Rivals, which was the first class under a full recruiting cycle for Washington head coach since being hired away by Boise State.  He appeared in all 13 games played by Washington last season, in which he caught 13 passes for 178 yards.

This Memorial Day, take time to remember

ARLINGTON, VA - MAY 27:  A member of the U.S. Army Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), salutes after placing a flag on a grave stone at Arlington National Cemetary May 27, 2004 in Arlington, Virginia. An event called "Flags In" takes place before every Memorial Day weekend in honor of those veterans who have lost their lives.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Associated Press
Leave a comment

(Reprinted and reposted with permission for a seventh straight year from, well, me.)

You have to admit that, despite the financial woes and political in-fighting and every other really crappy thing going on, we have a pretty damn good life, living in these United States of America.  It’s a far-from-perfect country, but, dammit, it’s ours.  Ours because our own have and will continue to shed their blood in the ultimate sacrifice.  Gave and will continue to give their lives, their hopes, their dreams so that we — and our children and our children’s children and their children — may live and realize ours and theirs.

As you go about your day today, doing whatever it is that you do on Memorial Day, take a second or two or sixty — or more — to reflect on what exactly this day is all about.

Please.  Just take a moment.  Take a moment to God bless those who have given so much.

God bless those who have paid the ultimate price for the freedom we enjoy day-in and day-out.

God bless those hundreds of thousands who’ve lost fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, sons and daughters in the ultimate sacrifice paid forward to every single one of us, for our freedoms.

And thank you — thank you, thank you, thank you with every fiber of my being — to those who continue serving this country and keeping this great nation safe.

And, again, God bless families torn apart and made lesser by the heartbreaking losses, hellish and unthinkable holes in the soul that allow us to do whatever the hell it is we want to on this day and every other day of the year…

Florida AD Jeremy Foley suggests no long-term revival of Gators-Hurricanes

MIAMI GARDENS, FL - SEPTEMBER 07: Quinton Dunbar #1 of the Florida Gators is tackled by Stacy Coley #3 of the Miami Hurricanes during a game  at Sun Life Stadium on September 7, 2013 in Miami Gardens, Florida.  (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
9 Comments

The Florida Gators play Florida State every year, and that appears to be the only school from the ACC Florida will continue to play annually. Sorry, Miami.

Florida Athletics Director Jeremy Foley was a guest on WRUF in Gainesville, where he was on to discuss a number of various Florida sports topics. Among them, of course, was a question about the future of the Florida-Miami series, if you can even call it a series these days. Foley did not leave much room for the possibility of a long-term series with the Hurricanes.

“No, I do not see them on our schedule on a regular basis,” Foley said. “I think when you’re asking your football team to play eight games in this league and Florida State? That’s a tough slate. This league is obviously as good as it gets, and Florida State is as good as it gets.”

SEC schools are locked to an eight-game conference schedule and must schedule one opponent from another power conference each year. The ACC has a similar rule, and Florida and Florida State each meet their respective conferences’ scheduling rules with their annual series at the end of the regular season. Miami has no such power conference rival to work with, so the Hurricanes are forced to look elsewhere to satisfy their scheduling requirements.

Florida and Miami are scheduled to open the 2019 season against each other in Orlando, but that is the only game in the foreseeable future for a pair of power conference programs that once played on an annual basis until 1987. Since 1987, Florida and Miami have played just six games, including a pair of postseason bowl games.

Helmet sticker to Gridiron Now.