Louisville wins by double digits, criticized for missed opportunity

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Louisville could have made a bit of a statement Thursday night at home. through no fault of their own, the conference strength in the American Athletic Conference will continue to hold Louisville back when being compared to other teams in the BCS Championship conversation. Maybe the Cardinals would not have been on par with a team like Alabama or Oregon, but what about against a top one-loss team from another power conference or a team like Ohio State. Despite Teddy Bridgewater throwing his 10th career 300-yard game and Louisville topping Rutgers 24-10, the conversation is already focused on what Louisville lacks to be a title contender.

To be fair, there was room for criticism of Louisville Thursday night. The Cardinals had three turnovers on the night, but the defense came up with four turnovers of their own to break even in the turnover margin. Louisville left some points on the scoreboard, having one field goal blocked and missing another long attempt and losing a fumble when Bridgewater was blind sided. It was not the kind of night that a casual college football fan would tune in, watch and go to bed thinking “Man, that Louisville team is awesome.”

That depends on your definition of “awesome.”

One part of the team that shined for Louisville that shined in the national spotlight was the defense. The Cardinals picked off four passes from Rutgers quarterback Gary Nova and sacked him eight times. But the skeptics of Louisville will also note the Scarlet Knights are coming off a short week after playing an overtime game at SMU on Saturday and again hitting the road to play at Louisville. Make no mistake about this though, Louisville can play defense and their numbers are only partially influenced by the level of competition faced.

But here’s something to consider. Great teams will win games even when they are not their sharpest. On Thursday night, that is what Louisville did without their leading wide receiver and while losing another. The offense made mistakes and the special teams had some unfortunate moments, but the defense bailed them out time and time again. Great teams do that.

Is Louisville a great team? That depends on your definition of “great.”

The biggest obstacle for Louisville now may be convincing the voters to evaluate them the way teams in tougher conferences will be addressed. Does Louisville have a chance to play for a BCS title? It is still too early to even entertain that conversation because there are so many variables still left to solve. How many undefeated teams will there be? Who will the top one-loss teams be? Not quite at mid-October, these questions will have to be sorted out before even attempting to figure out how Louisville fits in to the equation.

The challenge for Louisville will be to continue winning games, and doing so by solid winning margins.

Next week Louisville will host another top threat inside the American when Central Florida visits. The Knights already have a win at Penn State and a close loss to South carolina behind them. Central Florida, on paper, is much more battle-tested than Louisville at this point. If Louisville can survive a threat from Central Florida, the Cardinals could very well be on their way to the first undefeated season in school history.

After that, we’ll let the BCS formula solve for “L.”

Ohio State OL Matthew Burrell transferring from Buckeyes

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For the third time this offseason, Ohio State has lost an offensive lineman to transfer.

The latest to leave the trenches in Columbus is Matthew Burrell (pictured, right), with the rising redshirt junior taking to Instagram to announce that, “after prayer and thought, I will be transferring from OSU.” While no specific reason for the decision to transfer was given, the lineman’s placement on the depth chart likely played a significant role.

A four-star member of the Buckeyes’ 2015 recruiting class, Burrell was rated as the No. 7 guard in the country and the No. 4 player at any position in the state of Virginia.  The past two seasons, the lineman had seen action in a total of 25 games, including 12 this past season.

In addition to Burrell, OSU offensive linemen Jack Wohlabaugh (HERE) and Kevin Feder (HERE) have all left the program since the end of the 2017 regular season.

UCF police go all in on national championship campaign

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Look, I get it. I know exactly how this game is played. They do it so that people like me will write about it and people like you will read it. It’s all a ploy to make everyone on campus puff their chests out just a little bit further and to keep their name on our lips just a little bit longer.

But doggone if it isn’t working.

More than three months after claiming its 2017 national championship, UCF has found a way to keep itself relevant, this time by having the campus police department get in on the act.

AD Danny White already committed to pay national championship bonuses for coaches who are no longer in the school’s employ, but that’s not even the end of this. There’s still a ring ceremony that is (or at least should) be forthcoming, and the banner reveal at Spectrum Stadium that’s surely coming at the 2018 season opener.

If you’re going to go all in on a publicity campaign, it’s best to go all the way in. As UCF has done here.

NCAA tables proposal that would allow players to play in up to four games and retain redshirt

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The NCAA’s Division I Council on Wednesday tabled a proposal that would allow players to compete in up to four games and retain their redshirts. Championed by AFCA executive director Todd Berry, the rule was touted as a necessary change in an era where teams play 14- and 15-game seasons.

The rule would allow redshirting players to replace injured players without personal cost to their careers. Presently, a coach with dwindling numbers at a given position is put in between the rock and the hard place of burning an innocent player’s redshirt or putting players at risk of injury through overuse.

Here’s how the NCAA presented the news:

The Council tabled a proposal that would allow football student-athletes to participate in up to four games per year without using a season of competition. Proponents argue that late-season injuries and other factors often require student-athletes who hadn’t played all season to burn a year of eligibility for a small number of games. Others wonder whether the proposal could be applied to other sports, as well, whether the number of games in the proposal is appropriate, and whether the timing of the four games matters.

It is not clear what opposition exists to the rule, though Big 12 commissioner, Council member and noted fear-mongerer Bob Bowlsby posited in January that teams could, for some unexplained reason, hold their best players back until the final four games of the season.

“I think it’s got a lot of merit,” he said, “but there are some hooks in it. I don’t know how comfortable people are with, suddenly in the last three games and a bowl game, you go from being a guy who’s on the scout team to [a prominent role].”

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The proposal is not all dead, as Miracle Max would say. The Council will now turn the tabled proposal over to the Football Oversight and Student-Athlete Experience Committees for discussion and feedback solicitation.

Former four-star Miami WR Dionte Mullins transfers to FCS Alabama State

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A little over five months after leaving a Power Five program, Dionte Mullins has stepped down a rung or two on the college football ladder.

A tweet earlier this week indicated that Mullins is now a member of the Alabama State football program.  Now, the wide receiver is listed on the FCS program’s official website as one of its 2017-18 football signees and is shown on the Hornets’ online roster.

In mid-November, Miami announced that Mullins “is leaving the football program to pursue more playing time opportunities at another program.”

As the Hornets play at the FCS level, Mullins will be eligible to play immediately in 2018.  Including the upcoming season, the receiver will have two years of eligibility remaining as well as a redshirt season to use if necessary.

A four-star member of the Hurricanes’ 2016 recruiting class, Mullins was rated as the No. 50 receiver in the country and the No. 37 player at any position in the state of Florida.  After playing in three games as a true freshman, Mullins had seen action in all eight games last season before leaving. He finished his UM career with four catches for 53 yards, all of which came this season.