Brady Hoke, Nick Saban

Da’Shawn Hand: Michigan’s loss is Alabama’s gain

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The general consensus Thursday morning was that Da’Shawn Hand, the nation’s No. 1 recruit, would play his college ball at Michigan. Brady Hoke’s staff was expected to land the nation’s two top recruits, with Hand joining No. 2 overall prospect Jabril Peppers, a defensive back from New Jersey.

But, like everything in college football the last three years, it all came back to Alabama.

“It was hard, but I think I made the right decision,” Hand said. “Roll Tide.”

Hand would’ve been a game-changing recruit for a program like Michigan. Adding him and Peppers to the mix in 2014 could’ve been a boon for Michigan’s BCS hopes, even with both players seeing their first collegiate snaps.

For Alabama, he adds to the ever-growing talent pool in Tuscaloosa.

“I know when I go in, I’m not going to No. 1 on the depth chart, and I know I gotta do a lot of hard work,” Hand said. “But they have the most freshmen playing this year, so anything’s possible.”

No doubt this one stings for Brady Hoke and his coaching staff. At 6-3 and with games at Northwestern and Iowa preceding a season-ending home game vs. Ohio State, Michigan isn’t in great shape. After beating Notre Dame in Week 2, it was hard to imagine this team sputtering to what could be a 7-5 finish. A year ago, Michigan went 8-5.

Hoke isn’t, and shouldn’t be, on the hot seat in Ann Arbor just yet. But landing Hand and Peppers in the same class could’ve positioned Michigan extremely well in a weak conference dominated by their rival to the south.

South Carolina hadn’t won 10 games since 1984 before Jadeveon Clowney — 2011’s No. 1 recruit — came to Columbia. In Clowney’s first two seasons on campus, South Carolina went 11-2; the Gamecocks are 7-2 and likely will make it three consecutive 10-win seasons with a victory over Clemson or in their bowl game.

Of course, there are plenty of other factors that’ve gone into that success beyond just Clowney — the emergence of Marcus Lattimore, for example.

But these No. 1 recruits are game-changers, especially for programs spinning their wheels a bit (side note: Michigan made the 2012 Sugar Bowl less on merit and more on fanbase; eligible teams in Boise State, Kansas State and Baylor all ranked ahead of Michigan in the final regular season BCS standings).

Perhaps Peppers can turn Michigan around on his own. But that’s not an easy task for any single player, let alone a defensive back.

Instead, the game-changing Hand goes to a program not in need of a game-changer. He’ll likely help widen the gap between Alabama and everyone else. Specifically looking at Hand’s choices, he’ll also help widen the gulf between the SEC and Big Ten.

While Hand talked up Alabama’s academics — he’ll major in civil engineering — Michigan brought excellent academics to the table. The difference-maker, then, become this: Two straight national championships, three in four years and a possible three-peat clinched in January.

It’s tough for any program to compete with that.

“Why not go where it’s a great possibility that you can win a national championship,” Hand said. “I’m just excited. Roll Tide.”

A&M assistant throws hissy fit after five-star QB decommits

LONDON - DECEMBER 09:  In this photo illustration a baby suckles a dummy whilst resting in her cot on December 09, 2005 in London, England. A recent US study has shown that cot deaths can be reduced by 90 percent if a baby sleeps with a dummy.  (Photo illustration by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
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Somebody needs a nap.  Or his binky.  Or both.

Quite the imbroglio was kicked up on the recruiting trail late Wednesday night when five-star 2017 quarterback Tate Martell announced that he had decided to decommit from Texas A&M and reopen his recruitment.  Martell, who had once committed to Washington as an eighth grader, made the decision after a recent trip to Ohio State, although he has yet to commit to the Buckeyes or anyone else for that matter.

While big news for A&M and its next recruiting class, Martell’s decommitment likely would’ve been given its 15 minutes of fame and then everyone would’ve moved on… and then Aaron Moorehead happened.

Moorehead is A&M’s wide receivers coach who apparently didn’t appreciate Martell’s “disloyalty” as, six minutes after the quarterback posted his tweet, the assistant threw a Twitter hissy fit.

“Scared for this next group of kids. There is no accountability and no sense of positivity when it comes to adversity. #selfish #allaboutme,” the coach wrote in a tweet that has since been deleted. Moorehead then attempted to cram the toothpaste back into the tube, but stepped even further into it with a subsequent tweet.

“People talk about leadership and this generation flip flops like its nothing. That’s a real issue. My dad would have whipped my ass,” another deleted tweet read.

Loyalty and flip-flop talk from a coach who abruptly left Virginia Tech for the same job at A&M? That’s rich.

They say you reap what you sow, though, and…

That would be Mannie Netherly, a four-star wide receiver who had been committed to the Aggies, with the key word there being “had” as the Texas high school recruit decommitted as well. But wait, there’s more.

“I would like to say thank you to TAMU & fans but due to some tweets subtweeted towards my brother, I will no longer be looking at A&M,” Tyjon Lindsey wrote in a tweet that, yes, has since been deleted. Lindsey is a five-star receiver who had been considering A&M, with the key word there being “had.”  Again.

Reaping and sowing, y’all.  Reaping and sowing.

UPDATED 11:31 p.m. ET: Right around the time I was hitting “publish” on this post, Moorehead posted an apology on his Twitter account.

Last night, I made some impromptu comments on social media out of frustration and out of a true love for Texas A&M Football.  I want to apologize to all of the young men in high school who work so hard to achieve their dreams of playing college football & I wish them all well wherever they end up.  I would also like to apologize to Coach Sumlin and the Aggie Family for not representing our university the right way.  I need to do better & I will.

Former K-State S Kaleb Prewett appears headed to Mizzou

MANHATTAN, KS - NOVEMBER 05:  Wide receiver Jay Lee #4 of the Baylor Bears catches a pass as defensive back Kaleb Prewett #4 of the Kansas State Wildcats defends during the game at Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium on November 5, 2015 in Manhattan, Kansas.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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In early February, Bill Snyder confirmed that Kaleb Prewett was no longer a member of the Kansas State football team.  Fastforward three months, and it appears the former Big 12 defensive back has found himself a new home at a former former Big 12 school.

While the school has yet to announce it, Prewett’s Twitter profile now indicates that he is a member of the Missouri Tigers. “Former Kansas State safety. Current Mizzou safety,” the bio now reads.

A couple of tweets from the former Missouri high school player seemed to hint at the development as well.

Prewett started eight of the first nine games at free safety, with the only game he missed being due to a concussion. He lost his job for the final three games, however, and then was kept away from K-State’s bowl game because of an alcohol-related arrest.

Prewett, a three-star 2014 recruit, played in six games as a true freshman.

Barring the unforeseen, Prewett will be forced to sit out the 2016 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules. The defensive back would then have two years of eligibility remaining beginning in 2017.

Little-used Vols TE Neiko Creamer to transfer, look elsewhere for playing time

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Failing to make much of a dent during his first two-plus years in Knoxville, Neiko Creamer has decided to ply his football wares elsewhere.

Wednesday evening, UT head coach Butch Jones confirmed that Creamer has decided to leave the Volunteers football program and will transfer out.  According to Jones, he and his staff will help the tight end find the right fit at a new home.

No reason was given for Creamer’s decision to look elsewhere, although the opportunity for more playing time would be a good place to start.

A three-star member of UT’s 2014 recruiting class, Creamer, whose father, Andre, played for the Vols in the eighties, was rated as the No. 18 player at any position in the state of Maryland.  After redshirting as a true freshman, and working as both a linebacker and tight end, Creamer played in one game during the 2015 season.

Former Bowling Green lineman settles concussion lawsuit for $700K

DETROIT, MI - DECEMBER 4: The Bowling Green Falcons enters the field prior to the start of the game against the Northern Illinois Huskies on December 4, 2015 during the MAC Championship at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)
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A former Bowling Green football player who claimed he suffered permanent brain damage has settled a lawsuit with the university.

According to the Toledo Blade, Cody Silk will receive a $712,500 settlement in the agreement reached between himself and BGSU.  As part of the agreement, the university did not admit fault and the former offensive lineman agreed that he would not pursue any further damage claims.

Silk had filed his suit in 2013, claiming “that BGSU coaches and medical staff failed to withhold him from practices after he suffered repeated concussions.”  Silk claimed that he had suffered two concussions in 2010, but was cleared by the football program’s medical staff to return to full-contact status in practice; shortly thereafter, he suffered a third concussion.

The lineman subsequently parted ways with the team, lost his scholarship and dropped out of school.

The settlement came after Silk’s attorneys had asked the Ohio Court of Claims to reconsider their initial rejection.  From the Columbus Dispatch:

 The court initially rejected Silk’s claims, finding Silk signed a release of liability to play football in which he assumed the risk of possible injury. He refiled the claim last year. A state attorney claimed Silk was exaggerating and overreporting his symptoms, but the settlement will keep the case from going to trial.

In their motion for reconsideration, Silks’ representation contended, the Blade wrote, “the release [of liability] didn’t cover ‘wanton and willful misconduct,’ which he alleged BGSU’s conduct was.”