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Tajh Boyd bruises shoulder, collar-bone as Clemson stings Georgia Tech, 55-31

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On a night that saw Clemson (9-1, 7-1 ACC) quarterback Tajh Boyd set a new ACC career passing record, the focus would later shift to the new record holder’s shoulder. On the final play of the third quarter Boyd appeared to injure his shoulder on a run up the middle for a first down. He did not return to the game, but he did come back on to the sideline with his helmet on to take some tosses on the sideline. Fortunately for Clemson, the game was already well in hand. Clemson capped the night with a 55-31 victory over Georgia Tech (6-4, 5-3 ACC), keeping the BCS hopes for the Tigers alive.

Boyd’s injury was to his left shoulder, his non-throwing shoulder. He immediately reached for his collarbone and shoulder area once he hit the ground. After the game Boyd said he had a bruised sternum and collar-bone but no broken bones. With a game against The Citadel next week, Boyd should be in good shape for a light work load if needed and should be ready to face South Carolina in the regular season finale the following week.

Boyd ended his night having completed 20 of 26 pass attempts for 340 yards and four touchdowns, 43 rushing yards and one more touchdown on the ground. His third set a new ACC career passing record with 96 career touchdowns. Cole Stoudt, a junior, came in to finish the game for Clemson’s offense. Martavis Bryant (176 yards, 1 touchdown) and Sammy Watkins (104 yards, 2 touchdowns) were huge factors in the passing game as the Tigers rolled up over 540 yards of offense.

This was the third straight game Clemson scored 40 or more points and third straight double-digit victory in aCC play since the Florida State game. Clemson’s defense had their work cut out for them against the running game of Georgia Tech, but they answered the call. Georgia Tech racked up over 350 yards of offense, slightly more of those yards coming on the ground. Vad Lee had a rough night passing against an aggressive Clemson defense, completing 13 of 23 pass attempts for 165 yards, no touchdowns and one interception. Robert Godhigh led Georgia Tech by rushing for 115 yards and two touchdowns and he added 85 receiving yards, but Georgia Tech’s lack of a consistent threat in the passing game ended up being a pitfall.

The win keeps Clemson in the BCS at-large conversation. The Tigers cannot win the ACC’s automatic BCS berth because Florida State clinched their division for the right to play in the ACC Championship Game, but an at-large berth is certainly a possibility. Clemson’s one loss this year came at the hands of the Seminoles and Clemson is ranked eighth in the latest BCS standings. It would be unlikely Clemson misses out on a BCS at-large spot, especially if Florida State is playing in the BCS Championship Game. A victory over South Carolina in the regular season finale would likely assure Clemson of a BCS bowl invite.

The result of the game carries a much more negative impact for Georgia Tech. In a crowded Coastal Division, Georgia Tech could not afford one more loss. Georgia Tech played their final ACC game and ended with a conference record of 5-3. Virginia Tech, Duke and Miami all have games in hand and just two conference losses, putting the Yellow Jackets at a bit of a disadvantage with no more opportunities to take care of business on the field. The big game this weekend will be played between Miami and Duke, with the winner getting a huge lift in the race to Charlotte.

SEC shut out of Top 8 for first time since 2006

NEW ORLEANS, LA - JANUARY 01:  Laremy Tunsil #78 of the Mississippi Rebels scores runs in a touchdown during the second quarter against the Oklahoma State Cowboys in the Allstate Sugar Bowl at Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2016 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
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Before you SEC fans throw your tomatoes at the screen, remember this: it’s not news when the Pac-12 gets shut out of Top 8.

But it hasn’t been a good day so far for the SEC. After losing the Great Satellite War of 2016 earlier today, the SEC saw eight picks come and go until one of its own had his name called. It was the longest drought to open the draft since 2006, when Vanderbilt quarterback Jay Cutler was the league’s top pick at No. 11.

The full list:

  1. Los Angeles Rams — Jared Goff, California
  2. Philadelphia Eagles — Carson Wentz, North Dakota State
  3. San Diego Chargers — Joey Bosa, Ohio State
  4. Dallas Cowboys — Ezekiel Elliott, Ohio State
  5. Jacksonville Jaguars — Jalen Ramsey, Florida State
  6. Baltimore Ravens — Ronnie Stanley, Notre Dame
  7. San Francisco 49ers — DeForest Buckner, Oregon
  8. Tennessee Titans — Jack Conklin, Michigan State
  9. Chicago Bears — Leonard Floyd, Georgia

And, yes, Laremy Tunsil‘s free fall surely had a lot to do with it.

Another milestone has already been hit as Bosa and Elliott became the first teammates to go in the top five since Oklahoma’s Sam BradfordGerald McCoy and Trent Williams all went in the top four in 2010.

Jared Goff becomes first Cal No. 1 pick since 1975, second Pac-12 No. 1 in four years

at Stanford Stadium on November 21, 2015 in Palo Alto, California.
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As expected, the Los Angeles Rams selected California quarterback Jared Goff with the first overall selection in the 2016 NFL Draft Thursday night in Chicago, thereby re-launching their franchise with a new face to lead the club to glory — and all that good stuff.

We’re here to examine the college implications of Goff as the No. 1 pick, of which there are many. Cue the minutiae!

– Goff is California’s first No. 1 overall selection since Steve Bartkowski, also a quarterback, went to the Atlanta Falcons in 1975.

– He’s the second Pac-12 No. 1 overall pick in the last four years, the first since Stanford’s Andrew Luck went to the Indianapolis Colts in 2012. The last before him? USC’s Carson Palmer to the Bengals in 2003.

– Goff is the Pac-12’s 16th overall No. 1 pick; 11 of those 16 have been quarterbacks. The last non-quarterback Pac-12 player to go No. 1 overall was USC wide receiver Keyshawn Johnson to the New York Jets in 1996.

– Goff is the 14th quarterback to go No. 1 overall since Peyton Manning‘s selection in 1998. All other positions combined? Five. Each of those five players played on the offensive or defensive line. Coincidentally, Johnson is also the last skill player to hear his name called first overall.

– Each of the last three No. 1 picks (Jadeveon ClowneyJameis Winston, Goff) was an early-entry.

– The Power 5 conference with the longest No. 1 pick drought: the Big Ten. No Big Ten player has been the NFL’s top pick since Michigan offensive tackle Jake Long went No. 1 to the Miami Dolphins in 2008.

Alabama DL coach Bo Davis out after possible recruiting violation, report says

AUBURN, AL - NOVEMBER 28:  Jonathan Allen #93, Tim Williams #56 and Rashaan Evans #32 of the Alabama Crimson Tide react after a defensive stop against the Auburn Tigers at Jordan Hare Stadium on November 28, 2015 in Auburn, Alabama.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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As some of his pupils move on to greener pastures this weekend, it appears Alabama defensive line coach Bo Davis is on his way out of Tuscaloosa as well.

Andrew Bone and Aaron Suttles of the Tuscaloosa News reported Thursday evening Davis is expected to resign or be fired after the school has opened an inquiry into possible violations on the recruiting trail. The nature of the violations was not revealed, but the NCAA has made “multiple” investigations into the matter and Alabama has opened its own corresponding inquiry.

Davis is a longtime Saban lieutenant, first working under him with the Miami Dolphins, then following him to Tuscaloosa as part of Saban’s original Alabama staff. Davis left for Texas in 2010 and spent a year at USC before returning to the Tide in 2014.

Alabama’s defensive line was nothing short of outstanding last season, providing the bedrock to Saban’s fourth national champion. The Tide led the nation with 52 sacks, ranked fifth with 108 tackles for loss and posted a national-best 75.73 yards per game rushing defense.

Davis’s contract runs through 2017 and pays him $475,000 annually.

 

Report: Conference USA football could return to ESPN this fall

HUNTINGTON, WV - DECEMBER 06: Remi Watson #8, Kevin Rodriguez #35, and Stefan Houston #3 of the Marshall Thundering Herd take the field before their game against the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs at Joan C. Edwards Stadium during the Conference USA championship game on December 6, 2014 in Huntington, West Virginia. The Thundering Herd defeated the Bulldogs 26-23. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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It’s no secret that ESPN is the front door to the college sports world, and any league that doesn’t have a foothold on the Worldwide Leader faces a serious uphill climb for coverage. See: Conference USA.

C-USA currently splits its rights between Fox Sports 1, CBS Sports Network and the American Sports Network and, unless you happen to be a fan of one of the league’s 14 teams, you probably didn’t see a game before bowl season. But that could change soon.

The conference’s television deals expire at the end of June, and Harry Minium of the Virginian-Pilot reported ESPN has become a “late but serious bidder” for a portion of the C-USA package.

A change in partners would be well received by C-USA on two fronts. First, it’s ESPN. Second, the conference isn’t raking it in as is. Minium reported Old Dominion has planned for a drop in television revenue of $600,000 to $700,000 this fall — up from the originally anticipated fall of $500,000. And ODU only received $1 million last year to begin with. The drop can be attributed to the exodus of high-wattage programs — Houston, Memphis, East Carolina — to the AAC, allowing Fox and CBS to pay below the agreed amount. Exit fees had subsidized the loss in revenue, but those funds are running dry.

Conference USA declined to comment on the state of the negotiations, but five games have already been moved to weeknights — indicated back-channel negotiations are well under way.

That Old Dominion (and, presumably, other C-USA schools) could make only $300,000 on TV rights from an entire year is, in a word, shocking. In a world where the Big Ten could secure half a billion dollars over six years for half its package, this is a nice reminder that that world isn’t open to everyone.