AJ McCarron blames Alabama’s failures on Alabama’s past success

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Alabama’s success led to an unavoidable letdown for the Crimson Tide in 2013, according to former quarterback AJ McCarron. In a radio interview Thursday McCarron suggested Alabama’s championship success the past few years led to younger players thinking they could take the field and win whenever they wanted.

“We had a lot of young guys,” McCarron told The Jim Rome Show on Thursday at the Super Bowl’s radio row. “In the end, success was our killer. Too much success and a lot of young guys coming in who didn’t know what it took to get back to that point to win. They thought we’d just show up and we’d win.”

After winning two straight BCS championships, Alabama head coach Nick Saban expressed concern over his team getting too comfortable with the championship expectations in 2014. The Crimson Tide were the preseason number one and held on to the top spot in the polls for 11 games before losing to Auburn on a walk-off missed field goal returned for a touchdown. Alabama went on to lose to Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl, with five turnovers directly leading to 35 points for Oklahoma. The two-game losing streak for Alabama came out of nowhere, but it was not something McCarron was totally stunned by.

“Myself and CJ Mosley, we were basically the two leaders of the team and we felt like it was a matter of time before it was coming,” McCarron told Rome. “It’s definitely tough to lose, but it kind of shows when you don’t have everyone buy into one system, one belief, then sometimes a team is going struggle.”

Is McCarron throwing his team under the bus? McCarron accepted the blame for Alabama’s Sugar Bowl loss in the postgame press conference at the time, but his more recent comments may shed some more truth than anything McCarron has said before. McCarron also took swipes at various recruiting services, who McCarron labeled as guys who never played football.

“You have guys who have never played the game of football rating these guys that they are a 5-star, because they’re sitting behind a computer screen watching their highlight film. Well, their highlight film is supposed to be good, the last time I checked. That’s the kind of thing that ticks me off about recruiting and when these kids come in, and they’re 5-stars and they expect to play right off the bat. It’s a little entitlement and when they don’t play off the bat, they get a little ticked off and they don’t want to work.”

For what it is worth, McCarron was rated four stars by Rivals back in 2008.

New medical study finds CTE in brains of 48 of 53 deceased college football players

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As the sport at all levels continues to aggressively address the issue of safety for its players, another report has surfaced that shines a harsh light on the potential brutality of the game.

In a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Tuesday, the Associated Press reports, researchers from the Boston University School of Medicine and the VA Boston Healthcare System examined the brains of 202 deceased men who had played football at various levels.  Of those, 53 played college football; 48 of them were diagnosed postmortem with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE as it’s more commonly known.

Even more startling, 110 of the 111 brains of former NFL players studied had CTE.  Conversely, three of 14 brains of individuals whose highest level of football was high school were diagnosed with it.

From the AP:

There are many questions that remain unanswered,” said lead author Dr. Ann McKee, a Boston University neuroscientist. “How common is this” in the general population and all football players?

“How many years of football is too many?” and “What is the genetic risk? Some players do not have evidence of this disease despite long playing years,” she noted.

It’s also uncertain if some players’ lifestyle habits — alcohol, drugs, steroids, diet — might somehow contribute, McKee said.

Dr. Munro Cullum, a neuropsychologist at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, emphasized that the report is based on a selective sample of men who were not necessarily representative of all football players. He said problems other than CTE might explain some of their most common symptoms before death — depression, impulsivity and behavior changes. He was not involved in the report.

CTE is a degenerative disease found in people who have suffered repeated blows to the head, particularly in sports such as boxing hockey, rugby and, of course, football.  At this time, CTE can only be diagnosed after death, although there are experimental tests being studied that may work on the living.

In that vein, the AP writes that “McKee said research from the brain bank may lead to answers and an understanding of how to detect the disease in life, “while there’s still a chance to do something about it.”

Among those who donated their brains and were part of the new study included Ken Stabler (Alabama), Bubba Smith (Michigan State), Junior Seau (USC), Dave Duerson (Notre Dame) and Frank Wainright (Northern Colorado).  All of those went on to lengthy careers in the NFL.

Ex-Penn State K Joey Julius tweets he’s ‘in full recovery’ in ongoing battle with eating disorder

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Monday brought word that cult kicking icon Joey Julius was no longer a member of the Penn State football team.  A day later, we have an update on Julius’ very personal but still public battle with an undisclosed eating disorder.

This past May, Julius revealed on Facebook that he “had to return to St. Louis to seek further treatment at the McCallum Place” as part of his ongoing fight with the disorder.  On Twitter very early Tuesday morning, assured concerned fans that he’s “in full recovery” and has “been discharged from treatment for awhile.”

According to PennLive.com, Julius has been treated for an eating disorder at least twice in the last year.

While Julius is no longer a part of the Nittany Lions football team, he’s still in their thoughts, as head coach James Franklin expressed during his turn at the Big Ten Media Days Tuesday.

With decision coming ‘very soon,’ dismissed Duck Darren Carrington reportedly opts for Utes

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Despite the off-field baggage he brings to the table, Darren Carrington‘s talent could very well lead the wide receiver to another shot with a Power Five program — perhaps even one in his former conference.

Earlier this month, Oregon announced that it had dismissed Carrington, a move that came a couple of weeks after the senior was arrested on charges of driving under the influence of intoxicants. According to a tweet from The Oregonian‘s John Canzano in the middle of last week, those circumstances are doing little to dissuade others as “[m]ore than one Pac 12 coach told me [last Tuesday] he was interested in… Carrington.”

More to the point, Canzano wrote that “the ex-Ducks receiver spent [last Tuesday] at Utah.”

Subsequent to that tweet, Carrington’s father, former NFL wide receiver Darren Carrington, confirmed to the Salt Lake Tribune over the weekend that his son had indeed visited Utah as well as received interest from other unnamed Pac-12 schools. The elder Carrington added that a decision on a new home would be coming “very soon.”

Then, Tuesday morning, word began to trickle out that Carrington had indeed opted for the Utes, although there’s been no official word from the player, his family or his rumored new program.

As Carrington, who expressed disappointment over how his time in Eugene ended, is already a graduate of UO, he would be eligible to play immediately for the Utes, or any other FBS program for that matter — even one in the Pac-12.  Camps all across the country will be kicking off in less than two weeks, which will lead to the Carrington camp expediting the transfer process.

Regardless of where Carrington ends up, his new team will be getting a gifted player with a consistent penchant for finding himself on the wrong side of headlines.

The senior’s 606 yards receiving last year were tops on the team, while his five receiving touchdowns were tied for first. His 43 catches were second on the team as well.

On the flip side, and in addition to his DUII arrest, Carrington was ruled ineligible for Oregon’s College Football Playoff Championship loss to Ohio State a couple of years ago; was cited for open container in October 2015; and was accused of breaking a man’s arm in a Halloween incident last year.

Report: Florida loses incoming frosh LB Nick Smith for six weeks

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Earlier this month, Florida lost one of the most experienced members of its defense to a season-ending injury.  This week, they have reportedly lost one of their youngsters on that side of the ball as well, albeit to one not as serious.

Citing a source close to the program, the Gainesville Sun has reported that Nick Smith underwent surgery on his left knee Monday to repair a torn meniscus.  It’s unclear how or when the linebacker suffered the injury.

As a result of the medical procedure, Smith will be sidelined for a period of at least six weeks.  Such a timeline would not only keep Smith out for the whole of summer camp, but for, at minimum, the 2017 opener Sept. 2 against Michigan in Arlington as well.

It should be noted that UF has yet to publicly address what if any health issues Smith may need to overcome.

A three-star member of the Gators’ 2017 recruiting class, Smith was rated as the No. 79 outside linebacker in the country.  While Smith has been expected to contribute immediately on special teams, his expected absence early on exacerbates the dearth of available talent in UF’s linebacking corps.

From the Sun:

The loss of Smith is a blow to Florida’s depth at linebacker, a position that returns just four players who have started a game for the Gators.