Michigan Stadium

NCAA football attendance topped 50 million for the first time in 2013


Football attendance topped 50 million for the first time in 2013, according to a report released by the NCAA earlier this month.

The 657 schools in the NCAA who have football programs drew 50,291,275 total fans to break the mark of 49,699,419 set in 2011.

Of course, one reason for the increase in attendance is the increase in the number of schools playing football. There were 13 more schools in 2013 than in 2012.

Still, the FBS averaged an attendance of 45,671 per game and drew a record 38,135,118 fans. The FCS totaled 6,238,740 fans, while Division II attracted 2,985,610 spectators. Division III also recorded an all-time high with 2,465,231 total fans.

To no one’s surprise, the SEC led all FBS conferences in average attendance for the 16th-straight season and enjoyed another record-setting year with 7,567,406 fans in 2013.

But the Big House carried the day as usual among all teams. Michigan’s average of 111,592 fans at its seven home contests led the nation for its 16th consecutive attendance title.

Two other programs also topped the 100,000 mark: Ohio State at 104,933; and Alabama at 101,505.

Other highlights from the report:

• The SEC attendance averaged 75,674 per game to lead all conferences. The Big Ten (70,431), Big 12 (58,899), Pac-12 (53,619) and Atlantic Coast (49,982) rounded out the top five in conference attendance;

• Seven FBS and FCS conferences set records for total attendance. The FBS conferences were the SEC, Big Ten, Pac-12 and ACC. The FCS conferences were the Missouri Valley Football, Big Sky and Pioneer Football League;

• The FBS postseason featured 35 bowl games that totaled 1,714,617 spectators for an average of 48,989 fans per contest;

• Michigan, the first school to average more than 100,000 a game (in 1976), has captured the attendance title 44 times since 1949, including 38 since 1974.

• For all-game attendance — including home, road and neutral-site games — Auburn led all schools with 1,204,185 fans watching the Tigers during 14 games. Thirteen teams played in front of more than one million fans this season.

• Five FBS programs enjoyed an increase of more than 8,000 fans per game versus 2012. Leading the way was Washington, which reopened Husky Stadium after a 21-month renovation project. With the renovated stadium opening in August, Washington drew an average of 10,153 more fans per game from 2012 to ’13. The Huskies were followed by Kentucky (9,781), Buffalo (9,495), Akron (8,575) and Pittsburgh (8,247).

Report: Myles Jack leaves UCLA, will enter NFL Draft

Myles Jack
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Well here’s a bit of a shocker for you this morning. UCLA running back Myles Jack has reportedly withdrawn from UCLA and will prepare to enter the NFL Draft in 2016. The news was first reported, via Twitter, by Pete Thamel of Sports Illustrated.

Jack has played linebacker and fullback for the Bruins, and his decision to turn pro now comes off feeling a bit strange. Head coach Jim Mora certainly questions the decision by Jack.

“I think it’s very risky to do this. There’s a lot of speculation to ….where he fits,” Mora explained, via Thamel. “I’ve been in 25 Draft rooms. I’ve never seen a guys taken off (two games of junior tape)… Myles’ talent is without question. I hope he’s put enough out there where they can get a true evaluation.”

Jack suffered a season-ending knee injury last month in a practice. The injury led USC Athletics Director Pat Haden to send him a letter wishing him well in a sign of good sportsmanship between conference and crosstown rivals. Perhaps the season-ending injury led Jack to consider the consequences of returning in 2016 in a UCLA uniform, with players not being compensated for their play. The question then becomes if Jack is a good enough talent to go in round one, or even round two, considering the latest injury situation for him.

Well, here is the instant opinion of our friend Josh Norris of Rotoworld and an NFL Draft analyst…

Jack was a two-time second team All-Pac-12 selection and Pac-12 Defensive and Offensive Freshman of the Year in 2013.

Hokies QB Brewer a gametime decision, but RB Williams out for the year

Michael Brewer
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Virginia Tech has been playing just about the whole season without starting quarterback Michael Brewer after the Hokies signal-caller broke his collarbone in the first game of the season. Now, Brewer is on his way back to the field. Brewer has been medically cleared to return to practice in Blacksburg. It may still be another few weeks until he gets back in a game for Virginia Tech.

Brewer broke his collarbone in Virginia Tech’s season-opening loss to Ohio State. Once he left the game, it seemed the Hokies were unable to give the defending national champions much of a fight for a second straight season. He was originally expected to miss eight to 10 weeks of action, which would have meant a return for a Halloween game against Boston College as the earliest likely date. Virginia Tech has a bye week after the Boston College game, meaning Brewer could then be available for a Thursday night division game against Georgia Tech on November 12. Considering all of that, the chance Brewer might be available to play this Friday night against N.C. State is quite a pleasant surprise for a Virginia Tech team in need of some help after dropping to 2-3 after a second straight loss last weekend. Andy Bitter of The Roanoke Times says Brewer could be a gametime decision for Frank Beamer.

The outlook is not quite as possible for Hokies running back Marshawn Williams. Williams will be out for the rest of the season after reinjuring his left knee in practice in late September. It is the same knee that was surgically repaired last December. Williams can use this season as his redshirt season as he has not played in a game this season. He will still have three years of eligibility remaining when he returns to the team next fall.