Ex-Mizzou QB James Franklin: ‘I wouldn’t say supportive, but accepting’ of Michael Sam

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There are many facets and levels to Michael Sam‘s game-changing revelation this past weekend that will continue to reveal themselves as the discussion of gays in sports moves forward.

Case in point?  James Franklin.

Franklin was Missouri’s starting quarterback during most of Sam’s time with the football program and was one of the teammates to whom the defensive lineman came out during summer camp last August.  The picture painted by the program’s head coach and the university’s athletic director was that it was all puppy dogs and unicorns following Sam’s announcement of his homosexuality, with Gary Pinkel stating that he took “great pride in how Michael and everyone in our program handled his situation.”

Almost immediately after Sam publicly came out as being gay, former Mizzou tight end and Sam’s roommate Eric Waters called out his former teammates on Twitter, writing that “[h]alf y’all posting these pics saying how proud you are… [were] the ones talkin s**t behind his back in the locker room.”

The deeply-religious Franklin — those beliefs were the subplot of a controversy two seasons ago — was asked by TMZ.com of all places about Sam, who will likely become the first active, openly-gay player in the NFL.  Franklin, as has ofttimes been the case, minced no words.

“I don’t drink.  I don’t curse.  I don’t support [homosexuality] — but it doesn’t mean I don’t accept Michael,” Franklin says.

When asked if he was supportive of Sam when he made his announcement in August, Franklin said … “I wouldn’t say supportive, but accepting.  A lot of people confuse supporting and accepting.”

In an interview with the Columbia Missourian, Franklin added some context to his comments that appeared on TMZ.

“I grew up to say, ‘yes, ma’am’ and ‘yes, sir,'” Franklin said. “You know the saying, ‘hate the sin, not the sinner.’ I was raised a certain way — like I don’t to drink and swear.”

“But I would not look down on anyone for what they choose to do in their personal life,” Franklin, whose father is an evangelical minister, continued. “I love Michael (Sam) and will always be there for him.”

Again, multiple layers and myriad facets still to come — as even those close to Sam are still finding out and processing and coming to grips with.

(Tip O’ the Cap: CFB247.com)

Sonny Dykes to coach new team, SMU, in bowl game vs. old team, Louisiana Tech

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This is something you don’t see every day, in a couple of ways.

Monday night, SMU confirmed reports that had surfaced earlier in the day that Sonny Dykes has been named as the Mustangs’ new head football coach.  Dykes replaces Chad Morris, who left for the same job at Arkansas late last week.

At an introductory press conference Tuesday afternoon, Dykes’ new boss, athletic director Rick Hart, revealed that the new coach will get to work immediately as he will coach the Mustangs in their bowl game Dec. 20.  Dykes will immediately begin assembling his coaching staff to help in preparation for the Frisco Bowl.

And SMU’s opponent in the Frisco Bowl?  Louisiana Tech, which Dykes was the head coach of from 2010-12.  After going 22-15 in three years at Tech, he left for the same job at Cal in December of 2012.  He went 19-30 with the Bears before being fired after his fourth season in 2016.

Jack Cichy won’t seek sixth season, leaves Wisconsin for NFL

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One snakebitten Wisconsin linebacker has decided to call it a career, at least when it comes to the Badgers.

Jack Cichy announced in a Players’ Tribune article Tuesday that he will be leaving UW and making himself available for the 2018 NFL draft.  The fifth-year senior could’ve, because of injuries, applied for a sixth season of eligibility.

“I’m excited for what’s to come, but I can tell you that deciding to leave Madison was one of the most difficult decisions I’ve ever had to make,” Cichy wrote. “This place has become my home. …

“I’m a Badger for life.”

Projected to be one of the top linebackers in the Big Ten this season, Cichy was instead sidelined for the entire year after suffering a torn ACL during summer camp this past August.  Last season, Cichy started the first seven games for the Badgers before going down with a torn pectoral muscle that sidelined him for the remainder of the year.  Despite missing nearly half the season, he was still named honorable mention All-Big Ten.

All told, he started 11 games during his time in Madison, which began as a walk-on in 2013.

Ace recruiter Tim Brewster following Jimbo Fisher to A&M

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Tim Brewster is taking his Twitter act — and recruiting talents — to College Station.

The top recruiter announced on his personal Twitter account Tuesday morning that he will be joining Jimbo Fisher‘s coaching staff at Texas A&M.  Fisher left as the head coach at Florida State earlier this month for the same job at A&M.

Brewster spent four years on Fisher’s FSU staff, serving as the Seminoles’ tight ends coach.  From 1998-2001, he served in the same role for Mack Brown at Texas.

Brewster had one prior stint in the SEC, at Mississippi State in 2012 where he was the Bulldogs wide receivers coach.  He was the head coach at Minnesota from 2007-2010, compiling a 15-30 record before being fired midway through his fourth season.

Former Georgia QB Jacob Park transferring from Iowa State too

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Jacob Park‘s winding collegiate football journey has taken yet another twist.

The quarterback confirmed to the Des Moines Register that he has decided to transfer from Iowa State and continue his playing career elsewhere.  The football program has granted Park, who will be leaving as a graduate, a release from his scholarship, although there’s no word on what if any restrictions were attached.

The development comes a little over two months after Park took a sudden leave of absence due to what were described as “unspecified medical concerns.” Park confirmed to the Register that he was facing a one-game suspension after testing positive for marijuana prior to his sabbatical.

From the newspaper’s report:

He said the challenge of balancing school, football, fatherhood and living with the mother of his child became overwhelming. Park also said he failed a drug test because of marijuana usage and was facing a one-game suspension that was supposed to have been served against Oklahoma on Oct. 7.

Park said he talked to Iowa State’s staff about his marijuana usage. The night before the suspension was supposed to be served, Iowa State announced Park had taken an indefinite leave from the team to “work through some personal health issues.”

“It was not something that was very easy to deal with when you have so much high-pressure situations that you’re being put into as I do,” Park said Monday. “And it’s a coping mechanism that I understand now is not acceptable and that I’m still working on this to this day.

Park had started the first four games of the 2017 season for the Cyclones in his second year in Ames.  In his first season at ISU, he became the full-time starter in the latter portion of the 2016 season.  During his time with the Cyclones, he completed nearly 60 percent of his passes for 2,971 yards, 21 touchdowns and 10 interceptions.  He also ran for a pair of touchdowns in that span.

If the move on comes to fruition, Park will be working on his fourth collegiate program in less than four years.

A four-star member of Georgia’s 2014 recruiting class, Park was rated as the No. 12 pro-style quarterback in the country; the No. 4 player at any position in the state of South Carolina; and the No. 229 player overall according to Rivals.com.  Park worked mainly with the scout team during his only season with the Bulldogs.

In mid-June of 2015, it was confirmed that Park would be transferring from Georgia.  After spending the 2015 season at the junior college level, Park transferred to ISU in February of 2016.