Nick Marshall Gus Malzahn

Malzahn won’t allow Nick Marshall to work with QB guru


Over the years, more and more of the top quarterbacks in the country at nearly every have been flocking to George Whitfield.  The guru du jour at the most important position on a football field has worked with the likes of the 2010, 2011 and 2012 Heisman winners, Cam Newton, Robert Griffin III and Johnny Manziel, and is expected to bring the reigning Heisman winner, Jameis Winston, under his growing coaching umbrella as well.

If it’s up to Gus Malzahn, however, a player who could be in play for the 2014 stiff-armed trophy won’t follow suit.

Speaking to Brandon Marcello of, the Auburn head coach was very succinct when it comes to reports that his quarterback, Nick Marshall, will work with Whitfield this offseason — he’s decidedly against it.  In fact, Malzahn sounds very much like he’s outright forbidding it.

“You want them thinking exactly like you want them to think,” Malzahn said. “When you get multiple people working, there’s multiple thoughts, so we want them thinking one way. …

“We’ve never had anyone work with our quarterbacks while they still had eligibility. We feel really good about how we go about it and the success we’ve had before. There won’t be anyone working with our quarterbacks until their eligibility is exhausted.”

So that’s that, apparently.

Marshall, who in his first season as a starter helped lead the Tigers to the BCS title game against Florida State, was reportedly headed to California, along with Winston, to work with Whitfield this summer.  Barring an unexpected development, Winston will still make the pilgrimage.

More times than not, coaches don’t have an issue with their players seeking out Whitfield’s counsel.  Ohio State’s Urban Meyer and Clemson’s Dabo Swinney, for example, had no issues with their quarterbacks, Braxton Miller and Tajh Boyd, respectively, working with Whitfield while they were still in college.

With the blessing of Kevin Sumlin, Manziel began working with Whitfield in the summer of 2013.  Manziel is also working with Whitfield as he prepares for the 2014 NFL draft.

Appalachian State announces five-year extension for head coach Scott Satterfield

Scott Satterfield
Associated Press
1 Comment

One day after it was revealed its head coach was the second-lowest paid in college football, Appalachian State announced a five-year contract extension for head coach Scott Satterfield.

“We have the right coach leading our football program in Scott Satterfield,” Appalachian State AD Doug Gillin said in a statement. “In nearly three years as head coach, he has stayed true to his convictions, built the program the right way and set Appalachian State football up for sustainable success both in the Sun Belt Conference and at the national level.”

Satterfield had earned $375,000 annually, ahead of only Louisiana-Monroe’s Todd Berry at $360,000 a year.

Satterfield, 42, is 14-14 in his third season at the Boone, N.C., school. He led the Mountaineers to a 7-5 mark in their debut Sun Belt season, and has the club at 3-1 to start the 2015 campaign.

“It’s exciting for my family and me to know that we’re going to be at Appalachian for the foreseeable future,” Satterfield added. “I’m living a dream by being the head coach at my alma mater and can’t wait to continue to work hard to help this program reach heights that it has never reached before.”

Wisconsin announces 10-year agreement with Under Armour

Joel Stave
Associated Press

What has long been rumored became fact Friday, as Wisconsin announced a 10-year agreement with Under Armour.

“I am absolutely thrilled about our new partnership with Under Armour,” AD Barry Alvarez said in a statement. “Kevin Plank and his team have established a brand that fits perfectly with the Wisconsin athletics story and culture. Our primary focus at Wisconsin is, of course, our student-athletes, and Under Armour’s passion and commitment to high quality and innovation will benefit our student-athletes for years to come. Our entire department is looking forward to a long and mutually productive relationship with the Under Armour team.”

The new deal will pay the Badgers a total of $7 million in cash and product in 2015-16 and is valued at $96 million over the life of the contract, good for second in the Big Ten, trailing only Nike’s new contract with Michigan.

Hidden within the contract are two nuggets that UA offered to sway the Badgers away from Adidas, from the Portland Business Journal:

Wisconsin will get as much as $500,000 from Under Armour to “rebrand” athletic facilities. It’ll get $150,000 to build out an Under Armour retail space in a campus gift shop called Bucky’s Locker Room. It also gets two summer internships for students at Under Armour’s Baltimore headquarters.

“The University of Wisconsin is an institution built on the highest values of academic excellence, and we are extremely proud to be teaming up with one of the most vibrant, distinctive and successful athletic programs in the country to help elevate the performance of all Badgers with innovative footwear and apparel,” added Plank.

Wisconsin’s departure continues to weaken the stronghold Adidas had built in the Midwest after losing Michigan to Nike and Notre Dame to Under Armour in recent years (the company still owns apparel rights for Indiana and Nebraska). The Badgers are now the 41st Division I athletics department and 17th FBS program to join UA.