Martin Jenkins

Current Clemson DB part of new antitrust claim assailing NCAA model


Like never before in its history, the NCAA has come under attack on numerous fronts, legal and otherwise.  From Northwestern players fighting to unionize college football to a former West Virginia football player accusing The Association in a lawsuit of capping the value of an athletic scholarship below the actual cost of attendance to the ongoing O’Bannon case, the very foundation of the governing body of collegiate athletics is quickly crumbling.

The latest attack on the organization, which Deadspin calls “NCAA-killing,” comes from sports labor attorney Jeffrey Kessler, who Monday filed an antitrust claim against the NCAA in a New Jersey federal court.  Four basketball and football players are listed as plaintiffs in the claim, including current Clemson defensive back Martin Jenkins.  Also listed are former UTEP tight end Kevin Perry and ex-Cal tight end Bill Tyndall.

Also named as defendants in the claim are the five so-called power football conferences — the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC.

The antitrust claim alleges, writes, that the NCAA “has unlawfully capped player compensation at the value of an athletic scholarship.”

The claim, however, goes well beyond bridging the gap between the value of a scholarship and the actual cost of attendance.  Instead, it sets the stage for college football and basketball players to be paid by the universities for their sports services and talents.

“The main objective is to strike down permanently the restrictions that prevent athletes in Division I basketball and the top tier of college football from being fairly compensated for the billions of dollars in revenues that they help generate,” Kessler told the website. “In no other business — and college sports is big business — would it ever be suggested that the people who are providing the essential services work for free. Only in big-time college sports is that line drawn.”

The fact that Kessler is involved in this latest assault on the NCAA could be a game-changer.  Kessler was partly responsible for the creation of free agency in the NFL in the early nineties, and he hopes to see similar results when it comes to college athletics.

“We’re looking to change the system. That’s the main goal,” said the attorney. “We want the market for players to emerge.”

Unlike others, the plaintiffs in this lawsuit are not seeking class-action damages (they are seeking individual damages, however).  Rather, they are seeking an injunction that would end what the suit claims is “price-fixing” at the hands of the NCAA “cartel,” with the ultimate goal being that players could be paid by outside sources well above the cost of a scholarship or even the cost of attendance.

The NCAA has yet to respond publicly to this latest attack on its sports model.

Was Washington loss the beginning of the end of the Steve Sarkisian era at USC?

Steve Sarkisian
1 Comment

Steve Sarkisian’s win totals in his six previous seasons are both a positive and a negative.

On one hand, he resurrected a moribund Washington program that went 0-12 under Ty Willingham in 2008 and took them to four consecutive bowl games from 2010-2013. He won nine games his last year in Seattle, then led a talented-yet-thin USC team to a nine-win season and AP No. 20 finish in 2014.

Those are good accomplishments. But the flip side of the argument is Sarkisian has never won double-digit games in a season, something that’s a necessity to keep one’s job at USC. The Trojans’ 17-12 loss to Washington last night — at home, no less — means the road to 10 wins and a Pac-12 title will be awfully difficult.

And worse yet, there are plenty of arguments to be made Sarkisian doesn’t deserve the benefit of the doubt and a little more time in Los Angeles to turn things around (#SarkAfterDark, his drunken rant at a booster event, certainly doesn’t help). The reaction from national media to last night’s loss looked like this:

Mandel, in his column, argued USC is right where it was two years ago with Lane Kiffin as its coach. And there’s this embarrassing thought, that looks more and more like a truth, for Pat Haden:

This one, however, was the most damning by far for many reasons, most notably that it came at the hands of Sarkisian’s old team. The sense among many Washington fans nearly two years ago was that the Huskies managed to upgrade coaches when the school lured Chris Petersen from Boise State upon Sarkisian’s departure to USC.

They were right.

USA Today’s Dan Wolken similarly wrote that USC needs to drop Sarkisian and bring in Chip Kelly from the Philadelphia Eagles.

This is the state of USC, and it may not get better. The Trojans start a brutal three-game stretch next Saturday at Notre Dame in primetime, then welcome Utah to Los Angeles the next week. A Halloween trip to Berkeley to face Jared Goff and Cal finishes it up. There’s a very real chance USC, for all its talent and all its hype, limps into November with a 4-4 or 3-5 record.

Sarkisian will have to engineer and sustain a major turnaround in these coming weeks, otherwise he’ll give Haden all the ammo he needs to unceremoniously jettison him after two years.

Starting Navy S Kwazel Bertrand undergoes surgery, likely out for season

Kwazel Bertrand, Jacobi Owens
Associated Press
Leave a comment

Navy has seen one of its most productive players on the defensive side of the ball play for perhaps the final time this season.

Kwazel Bertrand sustained a broken ankle in the win over Air Force last Saturday, head coach Ken Niumatalolo confirmed earlier this week. As a result, the defensive back will very likely miss the remainder of the 2015 season.

And, because he is a senior and has no other eligibility avenues to pursue, it would effectively end his collegiate career as well.

“I feel terrible for Kwazel. It’s really unfortunate any time a senior goes down with a season-ending injury,” Niumatalolo said. “Kwazel has been a really good player for us and we’re going to miss his presence out on the field.”

Bertrand started 27 games over the past three-plus seasons, including all four in 2015.